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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in…
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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions (original 2017; edition 2017)

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Author)

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1,0585514,830 (4.36)48
A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. 'Dear Ijeawele' is Adichie's letter of response. Here are fifteen suggestions for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It can start a conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.… (more)
Member:KLHtet
Title:Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions
Authors:Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Author)
Info:Knopf (2017), Edition: First Edition, 80 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2017)

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» See also 48 mentions

English (53)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (55)
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
I have seen and heard lots of reviewers saying that book is nothing new about feminism. And that's absolutely true. But to me that is the power of this book. I am familiar with every Suggestion found in this book. But it was told from such a basic point. It was very easy to fit the Suggestions into my own life because of the examples she used.

But at the same time it gave me an inside in somebody's life that is very different than my own. For example marriage. In my country or in the people I interact with who have grew up in (mainly) the Dutch culture but not religious, marriage is not something to aspire when you grow up. It's a milestone but if you never do, that's also acceptable. It's not a expected part of growing up.

I adore this book because it has nothing new to learn me. At the same time I want to give it to friends with children who don't seem to get why these things are worth thinking about especially when raising kids.

I think I will reread this throughout the years. Maybe my opinion will change. Or I need to be comforted, because Adichie has a very comforting writing style to me. Or just because I want to annotate it, I forgot to bring my pen and was to lazy to get up. ( )
  Jonesy_now | Sep 24, 2021 |
This book is a fantastic and short book but worth every second that you spend reading it. I think everybody should read it and I think it is a must-read for new or soon to be parents. ( )
  Pnazemi | Aug 22, 2021 |
Al igual que el anterior libro de la autora, este libro pretende ser un pequeño tratado sobre feminismo, pero en forma de prontuario en el que se explican quince consejos para educar a una niña en el feminismo. Es más amplio que el anterior, pero a la vez, la sistematización de la información hace un poco más ordenada la lectura. ( )
  Orellana_Souto | Jul 27, 2021 |
I quite enjoyed this, and especially liked the insights into Nigerian cultures. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
This one is a short book but extremely powerful. Adichie's friend, Ijeawele, wrote her a letter asking for advice on how to raise her daughter as a feminist in Nigeria. These fifteen suggestions on raising feminist children, regardless of gender, are Adichie's response to the letter. It will be the perfect companion to her previous book, We Should All Be Feminists, since it's written more with practicality and depth.

Her writing here is sincere and humble, a very accessible read that will speak for anyone. She also criticizes feminists' tendency to use jargon like "misogyny," "patriarchy," or other jargon words without explaining how it applies in human terms. It’s something that I feel many of us still struggle with, especially in academia.

I'm not yet a mother, let alone thinking about being one, but I still learned a lot from this little book. It’s also very engaging that you can read it over and over in one sitting ( )
  bellacrl | Jan 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichieprimary authorall editionscalculated
LaVoy, JanuaryNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wong, JoanCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
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For Uju Egonu.
And for my baby sis, Ogechukwu Ikemelu.
With so much love.
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When a couple years ago a friend of mine from childhood, who'd grown into a brilliant, kind, strong woman, asked me how to raise her baby girl a feminist, my first thought was that I did not know.
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A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. 'Dear Ijeawele' is Adichie's letter of response. Here are fifteen suggestions for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It can start a conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

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A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. 'Dear Ijeawele' is Adichie's letter of response. Here are fifteen suggestions for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It can start a conversation about what it really means to be a woman today
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