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Pirate Women: The Princesses, Prostitutes, and Privateers Who Ruled the… (2017)

by Laura Sook Duncombe

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1709140,989 (3.29)4
In the first-ever Seven Seas history of the world's female buccaneers, Pirate Women: The Princesses, Prostitutes, and Privateers Who Ruled the Seven Seas tells the story of women, both real and legendary, who through the ages sailed alongside--and sometimes in command of--their male counterparts. These women came from all walks of life but had one thing in common: a desire for freedom. History has largely ignored these female swashbucklers, until now. Here are their stories, from ancient Norse princess Alfhild and warrior Rusla to Sayyida al-Hurra of the Barbary corsairs; from Grace O'Malley, who terrorized shipping operations around the British Isles during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I; to Cheng I Sao, who commanded a fleet of four hundred ships off China in the early nineteenth century. Author Laura Sook Duncombe also looks beyond the stories to the storytellers and mythmakers. What biases and agendas motivated them? What did they leave out? Pirate Women explores why and how these stories are told and passed down, and how history changes depending on who is recording it. It's the most comprehensive overview of women pirates in one volume and chock-full of swashbuckling adventures that pull these unique women from the shadows into the spotlight that they deserve.… (more)
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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.
  fernandie | Sep 15, 2022 |
It's okay, not to bad, but really a bit heavy handed on the feminism. ( )
  cloidl | May 20, 2022 |
I would agree with other reviews that overtime the author trying to make everything into an argument for her feminism cause is getting a bit tiresome. The beginning on the book seemed better and fairly well researched. Not sure if it was me getting tired of her, or the quality dropping but it dragged towards the end. ( )
  cloidl | May 20, 2022 |
Pirate Women is a highly researched book about women pirates. The book is very interesting and informative. Its downfall, however, is the lengthy chapter about women in movies. As a woman, I find this entire chapter having nothing whatsoever to do with the history of women pirates and is quite tedious. Consequently, the rating of only three stars in this review. ( )
  lbswiener | Jan 10, 2022 |
An engaging glimpse at the frustrations of untold histories and the lengths we must go to fill in the gaps. This is a postmodern history, so don't expect a stereotypical tome. The chapter on Sister Ping was the most provocative. Seriously, more pirate movies featuring women! ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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In the first-ever Seven Seas history of the world's female buccaneers, Pirate Women: The Princesses, Prostitutes, and Privateers Who Ruled the Seven Seas tells the story of women, both real and legendary, who through the ages sailed alongside--and sometimes in command of--their male counterparts. These women came from all walks of life but had one thing in common: a desire for freedom. History has largely ignored these female swashbucklers, until now. Here are their stories, from ancient Norse princess Alfhild and warrior Rusla to Sayyida al-Hurra of the Barbary corsairs; from Grace O'Malley, who terrorized shipping operations around the British Isles during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I; to Cheng I Sao, who commanded a fleet of four hundred ships off China in the early nineteenth century. Author Laura Sook Duncombe also looks beyond the stories to the storytellers and mythmakers. What biases and agendas motivated them? What did they leave out? Pirate Women explores why and how these stories are told and passed down, and how history changes depending on who is recording it. It's the most comprehensive overview of women pirates in one volume and chock-full of swashbuckling adventures that pull these unique women from the shadows into the spotlight that they deserve.

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