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Refugee by Alan Gratz
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Refugee (edition 2017)

by Alan Gratz (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,643709,183 (4.42)3
JOSEF is a Jewish boy living in 1930s Nazi Germany. With the threat of concentration camps looming, he and his family board a ship bound for the other side of the world . . . ISABEL is a Cuban girl in 1994. With riots and unrest plaguing her country, she and her family set out on a raft, hoping to find safety in America . . . MAHMOUD is a Syrian boy in 2015. With his homeland torn apart by violence and destruction, he and his family begin a long trek toward Europe . . . All three kids go on harrowing journeys in search of refuge. All will face unimaginable dangers -- from drownings to bombings to betrayals. But there is always the hope of tomorrow. And although Josef, Isabel, and Mahmoud are separated by continents and decades, shocking connections will tie their stories together in the end. This action-packed novel tackles topics both timely and timeless: courage, survival, and the quest for home.… (more)
Member:Mr.Urban
Title:Refugee
Authors:Alan Gratz (Author)
Info:Scholastic Press (2017), 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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Refugee by Alan Gratz

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    I Escaped North Korea! by Scott Peters (Anonymous user)
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English (69)  Spanish (1)  All languages (70)
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
Refugee follows three children and their families, each attempting to flee their violent homelands, in different regions of the world and during different decades. Josef and his family flee Nazi Germany in 1938; Isabel and her family flee Cuba in 1994; and Mahmoud and his family flee Syria in 2015. All three go on harrowing journeys in search of refuge, face unimaginable dangers.
This book demonstrates that no matter how terrible a situation is, there is always the hope of tomorrow. ( )
  DanRosas | Nov 17, 2022 |
The book wasn't that good. The stories we kind of bland and I feel like he kind of dragged them on. ( )
  NorthElliot | Sep 14, 2022 |
This is the perfect book for what it is. Less skilled middle school readers can access it because the stories and language are straightforward. Chapters are short and always end on a cliffhanger. The pain of these histories is honest, without being hopeless. There’s enough “why did the character do that? What do you think they should have done?” to get into real discussions of compassion, welcome, trauma, and comparative history. Almost no historical background is required, and there are plenty of points to introduce that history. We taught it as a 7th grade book club choice to HUGE success — one of those books that almost everyone likes and many say is their favorite! ( )
  SamMusher | Apr 17, 2022 |
This is a powerful book. 4 voices of refugees in different times and places weaving together over both common and unique experiences. Realistically depicts fleeing for your lives, so don't think for a moment that it won't pack an emotional punch. The short story aspect is compelling, the scenarios are harrowing, and the characters are appealing in their everyday humanity. Deeply moving, but not without hope. If you are looking for a book to experience empathy on the plight of refugees, this one can't be oversold. ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
Refugee by Alan Gratz actually tells three stories, each about a family of refugees fleeing to what they hope will be better lives. Each exodus actually occurred in the twentieth century and one, the flight from Syria, continues even today.
I found this book on a shelf of best selling fiction and did not realize that it was a YA book. The four star rating is based on that. Were it to have been a novel aimed at adults, it would have lacked the depth and verve needed to be a good novel for adults and I would've given it three stars, at best.
There are currently 65 million refugees around the world, most of them unwelcome wherever they flee and all of them at the mercy of governments which, frankly, do not really know what to do about them. The current vituperative attitude toward them found in America is actually nothing new, the Jews fleeing Nazi Germany did not find open arms either (as the book notes), but is an especially ungenerous attitude given America's beliefs about itself and its own history.
If viewed with empathy and compassion rather than suspicion and animosity, refugees make good objects for the love Christians (often falsely) purport to believe in. Consider for a moment: what would make YOU abandon your home, your friends, most or all of your possessions and even parts of your family seeking a life in a place where YOU are unwanted, unknown, do not know the language, have no economic prospects, have few or no relatives or contacts and no real plan for your future? Life could have only become entirely without hope, entirely intolerable and enormously threatened day by day and hour by hour for you to even think of picking up your roots and fleeing.
This book does not dwell on that and for that I was disappointed. But it does describe the travails of the journeys families faced with that situation must endure as they hope for a better form of existence.
What makes this a YA book, I think, is that its stories center around children as their central character and the book resolves as would be expected in a book aimed at young readers.
It tells of one Jewish family's flight from Nazi's at the onset of WW II, another family's effort to escape their home in Cuba is face of Castro's oppression and the economic unsustainability of the country felt most vividly in the lack of food, and another family's flight from the indiscriminate mass murder through bombs and missiles of the crazed maniac Bashar Al-Assad in Syria.
It is an engaging read, even for an adult, and describes a problem likely to be with and even worsen for the world in the decades ahead.It may not inspire the empathy and compassion of the hard core anti-immigrant folks, but it should. ( )
  PaulLoesch | Apr 2, 2022 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alan Gratzprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goldstrom, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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CRACK! BANG!
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JOSEF is a Jewish boy living in 1930s Nazi Germany. With the threat of concentration camps looming, he and his family board a ship bound for the other side of the world . . . ISABEL is a Cuban girl in 1994. With riots and unrest plaguing her country, she and her family set out on a raft, hoping to find safety in America . . . MAHMOUD is a Syrian boy in 2015. With his homeland torn apart by violence and destruction, he and his family begin a long trek toward Europe . . . All three kids go on harrowing journeys in search of refuge. All will face unimaginable dangers -- from drownings to bombings to betrayals. But there is always the hope of tomorrow. And although Josef, Isabel, and Mahmoud are separated by continents and decades, shocking connections will tie their stories together in the end. This action-packed novel tackles topics both timely and timeless: courage, survival, and the quest for home.

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Alan M. Gratz is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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