HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Happy Holidays! The 12 Days of LT scavenger hunt is going on. Can you solve the clues?
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet…
Loading...

Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet Food (Third Edition)

by Ann N. Martin

Other authors: Shawn Messonier (Foreword)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
253613,064 (4.2)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
Being the pet nutrition geek I am, I didn't learn a whole lot I didn't already know about pet food quality and ingredients from this book. However, I did learn a whole lot about how terrifyingly unregulated the pet food industry is, how pet food is actually made, and a lot of other very important and interesting things involving the pet food industry. The author also touches on a lot of other very important bits of information both related to pet nutrition and entirely unrelated but important to animal welfare. While I did have some gripes with a few parts of this book, overall it was a very good and eye opening read and I would highly recommend it to anyone with a cat or dog. ( )
  Darksong17 | Dec 30, 2010 |
Very disturbing book...truly shocking.
Luvbirds
  dobermantalk | Sep 12, 2010 |
Though it contains some interesting information that I had not come across before, this book was largely a disappointment.

Throughout, this third edition text was riddled with errors and repetition. My suspicion is that the first edition may have been better. Contrary to my thinking that this was the same text with a few added chapters, it appears that they've tried to mesh the new data throughout the book without proper editing. You'll run into lines that start and end with the same phrase, or even contradictions where the author will quote a number in one sentence, then later say that same number is unknown.

On the up side, there is a great deal of information on the pet food industry over the last couple decades. The inclusion of rendered cats and dogs, and thus the euthanasia drug sodium pentobarbital, into pet food was discussed. Also, it was briefly mentioned how the leftover rendered products end up in the human food supply. In addition to these topics, there were discussions of other generally poor ingredient choices, Chinese sourcing, the industry response to the 2007 recalls as well as suspected problems and lawsuits in general, and animal experimentation. All of these topics are important and were fairly well documented. Unfortunately, the entire text was very dry. It was hard to stay focused on bland fact after fact, no matter how passionate I am about the subject matter.

To cap it all is an inclusion of short discussions on cooking for cats and dogs and some recipes. While perhaps Martin felt that, after a long listing of "what not to do", there needed to be a balance of positive nutritional guidance, her advice is largely off-base and ends up detracting from the book rather than adding to it. Yes, she has achieved longevity in her own animals with this framework, but I would argue that one could do better and that with so little space devoted to nutrition here, those wishing to follow her lead would begin with a foundation of questionable value at best, especially if their pets don't fall into the nice little box she's laid out.

In summation, as much as I wish the average person knew all of the information in this book, this is not the format with which to give it to them. I would only recommend this book for the determined reader. It should also be only for those interested in seeing behind the curtain of the industry-Oz as there are other better books for the "nutritious recipes and healthy food choices" the cover advertises. This book still has reread, or at least reference, potential for me, if for no other reason than that it does have some valuable information on the current industry even if it isn't in the most useful layout. ( )
  VKNask | Aug 25, 2009 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ann N. Martinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Messonier, ShawnForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
2008, third edition
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0939165562, Paperback)

The commercial pet food industry has a secret to hide — and Ann Martin wants to make sure you know it. Her research reveals some startling facts: that the pet food industry conducts animal testing in order to improve their product, and includes euthanized cats and dogs in the mix to heighten protein content. In this revised and updated edition, Martin continues to explore the shocking processes by which commercial pet foods are produced. She offers alternative recipes for feeding pets, nutritional advice, and an exploration of "Pet Peeves," in which she explores several scams aimed at pet owners. This groundbreaking book gives us a glimpse into exactly what we are doing when we buy pet food.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 26 Feb 2017 14:44:05 -0500)

The commercial pet food industry has a secret to hide -- and Ann Martin wants to make sure you know it. Her research reveals some startling facts: that the pet food industry conducts animal testing in order to improve their product, and includes euthanized cats and dogs in the mix to heighten protein content. In this revised and updated edition, Martin continues to explore the shocking processes by which commercial pet foods are produced. She offers alternative recipes for feeding pets, nutritional advice, and an exploration of "Pet Peeves, " in which she explores several scams aimed at pet owners.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.2)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 2
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 130,862,358 books! | Top bar: Always visible