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All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science…
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All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science Fiction Book (edition 2017)

by Gregory Scott Katsoulis (Author)

Series: Word$ (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
19213108,520 (3.5)3
In a world where every word and gesture is copyrighted, patented or trademarked, one girl elects to remain silent rather than pay to speak, and her defiant and unexpected silence threatens to unravel the very fabric of society. Speth Jime is anxious to deliver her Last Day speech and celebrate her transition into adulthood. The moment she turns fifteen, Speth must pay for every word she speaks ("Sorry" is a flat ten dollars and a legal admission of guilt), for every nod ($0.99/sec), for every scream ($0.99/sec) and even every gesture of affection. She's been raised to know the consequences of falling into debt, and can't begin to imagine the pain of having her eyes shocked for speaking words that she's unable to afford. But when Speth's friend Beecher commits suicide rather than work off his family's crippling debt, she can't express her shock and dismay without breaking her Last Day contract and sending her family into Collection. Backed into a corner, Speth finds a loophole: rather than read her speech--rather than say anything at all--she closes her mouth and vows never to speak again. Speth's unexpected defiance of tradition sparks a media frenzy, inspiring others to follow in her footsteps, and threatens to destroy her, her family and the entire city around them.… (more)
Member:MASpeech
Title:All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science Fiction Book
Authors:Gregory Scott Katsoulis (Author)
Info:Harlequin Teen (2017), Edition: Original, 400 pages
Collections:To Print, Upper School Speech
Rating:
Tags:US Speech, FIC

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All Rights Reserved: A New YA Science Fiction Book (Word$) by Gregory Scott Katsoulis

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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
In this dystopian world, words. gestures, and pretty much all forms of communication are copyright protected and everyone has to pay for each word they say or gesture they make. If this sounds like a pretty grim existence, it is - and also, most food is "printed" and tastes awful. In such misery, it's no surprise at least two people complete suicide in this novel. Speth, the narrator, causes social upheaval when she decided to go silent, declining to communicate after her fifteenth birthday. Overall, this was a fascinating novel, with plenty of thoughts on copyright law, advertising, and a society focused on consumption of goods. While the world is original, the plot and its direction feel very similar to other YA dystopian novels, so if that's you're thing, this one certainly won't disappoint. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Dec 31, 2020 |
There are a lot of books and a lot of different stories. But once in a while you pick up a really fresh one that takes you to the world you've never been before. I really enjoyed this book and would have given it 5 stars had it ended differently. Nevertheless, a book worth reading. And thinking about. ( )
  jakatomc | Dec 30, 2020 |
For the first half of this book I was floored by the concept and totally enthralled.
I found myself keeping as silent as the main character and feeling frightened to speak just as she is....so there was real emotional impact for me.
But the story got off the rails in the last 10 chapters or so (also why have the arbitrary $ amount with every chapter?) and I felt deeply disengaged with some of the plot choices near the end.
I won't be reading further installments.
I still find the concept super compelling, just the delivery fell a bit flat.
Also, I look to Harlequin Teen for a little bit of raunch and romance and there was absolutely zero chemistry between the so-called romantic interest and the main character. But maybe I shouldn't pigeon-hole a publisher? ( )
  Punkerfairy | Jul 12, 2020 |
The world building in this one is amazing. You're charged for every word and gesture because it's all trademarked. It's insane but it's so well done in this book. The plot itself is well done, although I have to admit the romance should just be omitted from this whole thing. It's awkward, there's no feeling in it nor is there chemistry. Speth is such an interesting character and her one gesture made a movement happen. There's a particular part in the book where you just wanted to jump right in and shake Speth in frustration. You get why she can't say anything but in such drastic extreme measures was it worth it? (those who have read it will know what I mean!)

Will definitely pick up the second one. It's such a great plot and world and I want more. I want to know what happens next. ( )
  sensitivemuse | Jun 15, 2020 |
This happens to be one of those books where the only thing I wanted out of it was the satisfaction of seeing a super BOLD idea slapped across the page. The BIG IDEA is admittedly fantastic.

I was even more interested in seeing if ANYONE could pull it off. It comes with a ton of issues, but if properly handled, even as a YA dystopia, it might have been brilliant.

I have no problems with a huge suspension of disbelief, but sometimes a big idea doesn't (and can't) ever jibe with reality. Sure, if the author put tech inside everyone's head that forced them to comply quite aside from the monetization of words, I may not have had too much of a problem... BUT. And here's the big but:

The world is ruled by lawyers, and beyond that, it's predicated on perpetual copyright taken to the full extreme. Very cool. Every word is monetized. You pay to use anything. Therefore, the only way to rebel is to stay silent. But even gestures are copyrighted and the totally observed police state is quite diligent and any neighbor can easily get a big paycheck by a helpful suite of lawsuits when it comes to pain and suffering. Good stuff. I love this kind of worldbuilding. I don't even have an issue with perpetual copyright laws handed down 6 generations of punishment for a stolen song.

It's good, perhaps great, satire.

However.

When it comes to the next step, when and if a populace decides to rebel, I had to ask a simple question. Why not make up our own words? When every word in existence is monetized and you need to start using them beginning on your 15th birthday, wouldn't YOU begin looking for a way around that? Keep the old language for making money with product placement. But make up your own words or language, or BETTER YET, any number of OTHER LANGUAGES?

Humans a wily that way. Just the idea of unintentional drift drives makers of dictionaries crazy. Some people can make tons of money keeping ideas stratified, but others would EASILY start making up whatever they want to get around the whole stuffy thing, too! That's just human nature! How many curse words do YOU know?

Exactly.

Well, I would have explored that issue instead of wringing my hands and crying and sticking by my weird silent guns on the hope that others would care. Or watch loved ones die. Or rely on the off switch.

Where are the pirates of the mind?

Other than this, it's a pretty decent YA SF dystopia. In one aspect, all the monetization and ads is pretty great worldbuilding. It's just the next step, the next dig down, that I have an issue with.

I usually don't go this hard on a book for ideas, especially since the rest was a pretty decent read as long as you suspend disbelief. Unfortunately, the disbelief became just a tad too heavy. ; ; ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
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In a world where every word and gesture is copyrighted, patented or trademarked, one girl elects to remain silent rather than pay to speak, and her defiant and unexpected silence threatens to unravel the very fabric of society. Speth Jime is anxious to deliver her Last Day speech and celebrate her transition into adulthood. The moment she turns fifteen, Speth must pay for every word she speaks ("Sorry" is a flat ten dollars and a legal admission of guilt), for every nod ($0.99/sec), for every scream ($0.99/sec) and even every gesture of affection. She's been raised to know the consequences of falling into debt, and can't begin to imagine the pain of having her eyes shocked for speaking words that she's unable to afford. But when Speth's friend Beecher commits suicide rather than work off his family's crippling debt, she can't express her shock and dismay without breaking her Last Day contract and sending her family into Collection. Backed into a corner, Speth finds a loophole: rather than read her speech--rather than say anything at all--she closes her mouth and vows never to speak again. Speth's unexpected defiance of tradition sparks a media frenzy, inspiring others to follow in her footsteps, and threatens to destroy her, her family and the entire city around them.

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