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No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack…
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No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack Reacher Short Stories (2017)

by Lee Child

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3261549,031 (3.89)20
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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Amixed bag of short stories, the first, longer stories are best and the following shorter ones weaker, but Reacher fans probably won't care. ( )
  edwardsgt | May 7, 2018 |
There's a reason why Lee Child is known for his novels rather than his short stories. ( )
  dickmanikowski | Mar 18, 2018 |
A collection of Jack Reacher short stories. Organised more or less chronologically in Jack's life they mostly take place before the novels, and start with a story of Jack and Joe growing up on bases around the world, before a few more of teenager Jack getting to grips with his personal morality and opportunities it affords. The last few are generally weaker and seem to have been written for a specific theme - christmas etc - before the collection ends with an excerpt from the next novel.

Not a lto else to say, if you've never met Jack Reacher (where have you been) this might not be the best introduction, but if you're already familiar with the style then there's little else to say - a few random encounters a bit of trademark violence, and a little clever thinking around the corners, eventually. There's no sense that these are deliberate reveals of his backstory and family, more that they've been opportunities to write in some of the other characters. It's the lack of continuous plots across the series that I dislike most about Reacher, and this collection does nothing to alleviate this. On the other hand they're all good stories, fun and written as well as any of the novels.

One for the fans, but still worth reading. ( )
  reading_fox | Feb 19, 2018 |
It's Jack Reacher - you know what to expect. Some of the stories were better than others. ( )
  infjsarah | Dec 16, 2017 |
Everyone is equal, but is he or her the most human? Does Jack Reacher, the man-with-no-middle-name, embody many men?

I'm surprised people that are interested in books don't take the opportunity to step back and recognise the multi-cultic hogwash that has made contemporary literary criticism so predictable and boring. So much criticism I see and read, myself included, is completely bollocks, but as essays (or assays), they’re still a wonder to read.

There are so many blatant untruths about human nature that people are expected to recite whenever they say anything that it just takes the edge out of everything, even when it comes to Lee Child and his Jack Reacher.

It's not unknown for writers of fiction to develop many characters over time, in order for them to have more structure, content, more substance, capable of exuding humanity from the innately indifferent pages of a novel. So, Pessoa was obsessed with character, a creative artist who took aspects of his art much further than anyone else? Look at a wide range of those who have or are considered to be the greats, Picasso, Dali, the great musicians and composers, most of them could have been considered obsessive in one way or another ... even Dulce Pontes could be called of as healthily obsessive with perfection, i.e. to the right degree .... I think this used to be called "hard work and perseverance" as well as "talent" and "creativity". I suspect both Pessoa and Lee Child may prove more reliable than cyberspace at delineating humanity's ever-changing face.

To be able to construct a persona to explore and reveal a way of thinking and feeling is an art, be it Bernardo Soares, Álvaro de Campos or Lee Child. Pessoa’s life was all about seeing the multiplicity of mind while Child’s is all about the down-to-earthness of mind. The great tragedy of many human lives is that so many minds are too lazy to explore themselves. Very few people create true heteronyms: mostly, through multiple pseudonyms, they return to the same few obsessions, quirks of style, political or philosophical beliefs. Following a few supposedly shifting personae over the years has for me rather reaffirmed the idea of an irreducible core to most human subjects. Which in turn reaffirms the artistic skill of a Pessoa when opposed to someone like Child, i.e., someone able to write somehow from a point "outside himself" not once but multiple times. Child can only write Jack-Reacher-Lee-Child novels while Pessoa can only write using Álvaro-de-Campos-Bernardo-Soares-Ricardo-Reis personas. Everyone develops different personas when writing. Even writing on this blog, the character that is presented isn't much like the myself url. In political discussions, I tend to strike a much more strident tone than is natural. In order to avoid the waffly “on the one hand this, on the other hand” that approach, attitudes are pared down and tend to the more radical than I actually am. In more light-hearted pieces, the sort of humour used is more suitable for the written word than for speech, so that is another persona of sort. I dare say this is very common with people writing reviews regularly, hence all the provocation that goes on.

The very fact that it is impossible, or at least extremely hard to arrive at a true voice (does such a thing even exist?) means that personae are unavoidable, deliberately or not.

To live as a persona attached to its narrow view of its world as WeAreTheWorld seems to do is so lacking in imagination. I imagine the fact that we respond to some books in a certain way give them validity in our own dull minds.

Or as the great philosopher Spike Milligan warned us:

“I talk to the trees. That's why they put me away.”

NB: Yep. I've read another Lee Child book. Deal with it! Yes, I'm looking at you, you trolls! ( )
  antao | Oct 28, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399593578, Hardcover)

Get ready for the ultimate Jack Reacher experience: a thrilling new novella and eleven previously published stories, together for the first time in one pulse-pounding collection from #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child.

No Middle Name begins with “Too Much Time,” a brand-new work of short fiction that finds Reacher in a hollowed-out town in Maine, where he witnesses a random bag-snatching but sees much more than a simple crime. “Small Wars” takes readers back to 1989, when Reacher is an MP assigned to solve the brutal murder of a young officer found along an isolated forest road in Georgia—and whose killer may be hiding in plain sight. In “Not a Drill,” Reacher tries to take some downtime, but a pleasant hike in Maine turns into a walk on the wild side—and perhaps something far more sinister. “High Heat” time-hops to 1977, when Reacher is a teenager in sweltering New York City during a sudden blackout that awakens the dark side of the city that never sleeps. Okinawa is the setting of “Second Son,” which reveals the pivotal moment when young Reacher’s sharp “lizard brain” becomes just as important as his muscle. In “Deep Down,” Reacher tracks down a spy by matching wits with four formidable females—three of whom are clean, but the fourth may prove fatal. Rounding out the collection are “Guy Walks into a Bar,” “James Penney’s New Identity,” “Everyone Talks,” “The Picture of the Lonely Diner,” “Maybe They Have a Tradition,” and “No Room at the Motel.”

No suitcase. No destination. No middle name. No matter how far Reacher travels off the beaten path, trouble always finds him. Feel bad for trouble.

Praise for Lee Child


“There’s a reason [Lee] Child is considered the best of the best in the thriller genre.”—Associated Press

“This series [is] utterly addictive.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times

“Jack Reacher is today’s James Bond, a thriller hero we can’t get enough of. I read every one as soon as it appears.”—Ken Follett

“The Reacher novels are easily the best thriller series going.”—NPR

“Reacher’s just one of fiction’s great mysterious strangers.”—Maxim

“Irresistible Reacher remains just about the best butt-kicker in thriller-lit.”—Kirkus Reviews

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 03 Apr 2017 21:26:24 -0400)

"Get ready for the ultimate Jack Reacher experience: a thrilling new novella and eleven previously published stories, together for the first time in one pulse-pounding collection from #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child. Get ready for the ultimate Jack Reacher reading experience. No Middle Name includes eleven previously published stories and a thrilling new novella from the twelve-time #1 New York Times bestselling author, shedding light on "one of this century's most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes" (The Washington Post). This pulse-pounding collection marks the first time that all of Lee Child's short fiction starring Reacher has been available in the same place at the same time. No Middle Name begins with "Too Much Time," a brand-new work of short fiction that finds Reacher in a hollowed-out town in Maine, where he witnesses a random bag-snatching but sees much more than a simple crime--a fact that could prove fatal. "Small Wars" takes readers back to 1989, when Reacher is an MP assigned to solve the brutal murder of a young officer found along an isolated forest road in Georgia--and whose killer may be hiding in plain sight. In "Not a Drill," Reacher tries to take some down time, but a pleasant hike in Maine turns into a walk on the wild side--and perhaps something far more sinister. "High Heat" time hops to 1977, when Reacher is a teenager in sweltering New York City during a sudden blackout that awakens the dark side of the city that never sleeps. Okinawa is the setting of "Second Son," which reveals the pivotal moment when young Reacher's sharp "lizard brain" becomes just as important as his muscle. In "Deep Down," Reacher tracks down a spy by matching wits with four formidable females--three of which are clean, but the fourth may prove fatal. Rounding out the collection are "Guy Walks into a Bar," "James Penney's New Identity," "Everyone Talks," "The Picture of the Lonely Diner," "Maybe They Have a Tradition," and "No Room at the Motel." No suitcase. No destination. No middle name. No matter how far Reacher travels off the beaten path, trouble always finds him. Feel bad for trouble. Praise for Lee Child "There's a reason [Lee] Child is considered the best of the best in the thriller genre."--Associated Press "This series [is] utterly addictive."--Janet Maslin, The New York Times "Jack Reacher is today's James Bond, a thriller hero we can't get enough of. I read every one as soon as it appears."--Ken Follett "The Reacher novels are easily the best thriller series going."--NPR "Reacher's just one of fiction's great mysterious strangers."--Maxim "Irresistible Reacher remains just about the best butt-kicker in thriller-lit."--Kirkus Reviews"--… (more)

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