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Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood
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Goodbye to Berlin (original 1939; edition 2012)

by Christopher Isherwood (Author)

Series: The Berlin Stories (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,606347,622 (3.71)118
First published in 1939, this novel obliquely evokes the gathering storm of Berlin before and during the rise to power of the Nazis. Events are seen through the eyes of a series of individuals, whose lives are all about to be ruined.
Member:Samuel.Sotillo
Title:Goodbye to Berlin
Authors:Christopher Isherwood (Author)
Info:New Directions (2012), 224 pages
Collections:Your library, EBooks
Rating:
Tags:Ebooks, American Writer, American Nonfiction, Nonfiction, Biography, Autobiography

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Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood (1939)

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» See also 118 mentions

English (26)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Swedish (1)  Italian (1)  Catalan (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (34)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
Whilst in Berlin recently we went to see Cabaret in German in a spiegeltent. Splendid. Naturally I was looking forward to reading about the very same Sally Bowles in this book, but it turns out that Sally Bowles is a complete English Arse. Utterly unbearable. I think it would be fair to say she's been thoroughly fixed up for the musical and bravo for that decision. Certainly this book improves on the pages in which she is not to be found.

There is much to separate this book from Kästner's Going to the Dogs. Partly it is a matter of style - Isherwood's humour, when it arises, is entirely ordinary, whilst Kästner's is odd to say the least. Then again there is the care Kästner has for his subject, the ruination of his country and his continent. One can equally feel, as Isherwood himself acknowledges, that he, in contrast, is an outsider, floating in a flotsam sort of way through his German period, knowing he can and will leave when it gets too tough.


rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/goodbye-to-berlin-by-chri...
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Whilst in Berlin recently we went to see Cabaret in German in a spiegeltent. Splendid. Naturally I was looking forward to reading about the very same Sally Bowles in this book, but it turns out that Sally Bowles is a complete English Arse. Utterly unbearable. I think it would be fair to say she's been thoroughly fixed up for the musical and bravo for that decision. Certainly this book improves on the pages in which she is not to be found.

There is much to separate this book from Kästner's Going to the Dogs. Partly it is a matter of style - Isherwood's humour, when it arises, is entirely ordinary, whilst Kästner's is odd to say the least. Then again there is the care Kästner has for his subject, the ruination of his country and his continent. One can equally feel, as Isherwood himself acknowledges, that he, in contrast, is an outsider, floating in a flotsam sort of way through his German period, knowing he can and will leave when it gets too tough.


rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/goodbye-to-berlin-by-chri...
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Goodbye to Berlin is the product of a masterful writer, capable of beautiful, lyrical descriptions of settings and moods, and insightful into the character and personalities of the book’s characters.
While the book offers up a series of short stories, each offering capable of standing on its own, the whole forms as a sort of loosely constructed novel where characters developed in one story wander into others in the book, and many are brought together is the book’s last story.
Isherwood’s construction and sequencing of the stories is masterful as well. He begins with a story developing the setting and context, proceeds to the story of Sally Bowles wherein he focuses on the character of Sally, a beautiful, sad young woman who sleeps with men to earn money and whose innocence and guileless combines with her lack of intelligence to create an almost comical parody of a person.
Later in the book, this same ignorant woman has given herself entirely over to sex, sexuality and kinkiest and has become not immoral, but amoral.
In the background is the shouldering rise of the Nazi party which comes full grown in last of the stories.
Good writing make good books and this volume certainly rises to the occasion. ( )
  Paul-the-well-read | Apr 18, 2020 |
This is the memoir of English author Christopher Isherwood while a struggling, down on his luck writer in early 1930s Berlin. By virtue of being a 'gentleman' he makes acquaintance with a number of high flyers, but due to his poverty he rubbed shoulders with the lowest of the low as well. During this disturbing period of rising Nazism, he depicted ordinary Berliners making their way in the world. Surprisingly there was a wide diversity of opinion about what direction Germany was going, with many were not that fond of the Fuhrer and his bully boys. Isherwood's slice of life vignettes touch on everything from healthcare, education, food, culture and, of course, politics. Pre-war Germany was not the homogenized mass of Fascists that the west often believes. The story of this vanished world was first published in 1945. ( )
1 vote varielle | Feb 25, 2019 |
An incredibly well written and interesting look at a unique point in Berlin history. The balance with which Isherwood manages both the highs of Berlin social life and the shadow of the approaching Nazi Germany, leaves one with a simultaneously foreboding and fascinated feeling. I thoroughly enjoyed this and cannot wait to read more of Isherwood’s work. ( )
  marie2830 | Sep 2, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isherwood, Christopherprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grosz, GeorgeIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Toorn, Willem vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whitford, FrankForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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