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The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha…
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The Priory of the Orange Tree (edition 2020)

by Samantha Shannon (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,917546,794 (3.99)55
The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction--but assassins are getting closer to her door. Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic. Across the dark sea, Tané has trained to be a dragonrider since she was a child, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel. Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.… (more)
Member:Altivo-
Title:The Priory of the Orange Tree
Authors:Samantha Shannon (Author)
Info:Bloomsbury Publishing (2020), Edition: Reprint, 848 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

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» See also 55 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
This was a great listen! It was first big fantasy audiobook and I must thank Liyah Summers for such a wonderful narration.
I love how the story is told from so many points of view and the insight we get into the main characters. Religion, culture, politics, they are all interesting and rich and they are such an important part of the story. One of my favorite characters was Sabran and I loved reading her story and how she grows up and overcomes every hardship that comes her way. The other one was Loth. His adventures were formidable and he was always true to his nature. It was sad to finish the book and know that I won't be visiting him again in another story.

One of the issues I had with the book is that it can very slow at times because the storylines don't converge until almost the end of it. There are also a lot of things I didn't enjoy or didn't live up to the expectations the book created; for example, I think that the only reason why I enjoyed the battle scenes so much is because of Lyhah's narration. They were over too quickly and when I tried reading one on my ebook it didn't feel epic or decisive.
There's also the matter of everyone being so accepting and calm when they are revealed world shattering information. ¿everything I believed up to this point is a lie? Well, of course, I'll change my worldview in a heartbeat, thank you. Only one of the characters seemed human enough in the face of the world changing around them.
The last thing I most definitely did not enjoy was the lovestory between two of the main characters. I can't see how Ead and Sabran could have fallen for eachother and I didn't like how their relationship developed. All throughout the book I thought Loth was better suited for Ead than Sabran ever could have been.

I am also left with a couple of questions:
What was the great imbalance that gave birth to the Nameless One? I am assuming it was the cutting of the tree, but why?
Why was the other tree cut down exactly?
What happened to Tané in the end?


Overall I enjoyed the story. The more I think about it, however, the more I think it was because of the narration and not the story itself. Had I read it, I'd probably give it two or three stars max because I can't stop thinking about all the things that didn't add up or that underwhelmed me.
I'd still recommend it because it's a good story, but only on audiobook. ( )
  Nannus | Jan 17, 2022 |
What a journey! And as an alchemist might say, the journey was the most important part. I loved every second, and you couldn't have ripped the book from my hands the last couple hundred pages if you tried.

The world is exquisitely detailed and presented well enough (with occasional referrals to the map and indices) for me to really dig in and understand what was going on. The play of differing cultures and beliefs in the main characters and how it affects their actions and thoughts was possibly the best I've seen in a fantasy world. It was the perfect loooooooooooong dive into a believable world to get lost in.

The writing alone, down to the sentence level, is so tight and perfect. The word and phrase choices Shannon makes are all active, beautiful, deep, making the very experience of reading this book and art form. That's impressive considering she maintains that art for over 800 pages.

I never quite connected to Sabran (possibly because we don't get her POV, though I certainly felt for her) so I didn't fully understand her as Ead's romantic interest, but it wasn't a detriment to everything else going on. It seemed like Ead started to unconsciously develop feelings for Sabran before we as readers had learned enough about Sabran, through Ead's eyes, for those feelings to make sense. There was an initial disconnect that did level out by the end.

I love how Shannon made many of her characters, even the side ones, either complex and/or play multiple roles throughout the story. Niclays would have been so easy to write off as a bad person, but Shannon did a great job of keeping my thoughts on my toes regarding him in moral terms.

Also, I desperately want to befriend an ichneumon ASAP, please and thank you. ( )
  hissingpotatoes | Dec 28, 2021 |
So, I've been "reading" this since it was released. I pre-ordered it, bought it full price. I regret doing so.

I've officially DNF'd this at 52% read. I put it down months ago because of the absolutely plodding pace and because, frankly, all the characters in this book are wretched and the one I did have an inkling of a care for died pretty early on .

I was sold on this as a book about dragons and in the ~450 or so pages I read, maybe 25 of them contained dragons.

Can't say I recommend this book as I've forgotten most of what occurred in this ridiculously over-long, slowly moving book. ( )
  Zenary | Dec 16, 2021 |
this took me a little while to actually get into. there was a lot of worlbuilding and multiple povs going on and i was intruiged but not hooked until Ead's story really started picking up. a really interesting world and all in all a romance (and 3 characters) that was the cornerstone of my enjoyment overall.

can't beat dragons, really. ( )
  banrions | Dec 7, 2021 |
Buddy read with Tim

Upcoming review, 4.5 stars ( )
  Sara_Lucario | Oct 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
It is a complexity—moral, thematic, and social—that The Priory of the Orange Tree is short on, for all its length.
added by amanda4242 | editTor.com, Liz Bourke (Feb 28, 2019)
 

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Samantha Shannonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Belikov, IvanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bernet, Jean-BaptisteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gallo, BenedettaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuntzer, BenjaminTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mann, DavidCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rizzo, JorgeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Summers, LiyahNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The stranger came out of the sea like a water ghost, barefoot and wearing the scars of his journey.
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The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction--but assassins are getting closer to her door. Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic. Across the dark sea, Tané has trained to be a dragonrider since she was a child, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel. Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.

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A world divided. A queendom without an heir. An ancient enemy awakens.

The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction - but assassins are getting closer to her door.

Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic.

Across the dark sea, Tané has trained to be a dragonrider since she was a child, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel.

Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.
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