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The Woman in the Window (2018)

by A. J. Finn

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,6692552,542 (3.79)118
"It isn't paranoia if it's really happening... Anna Fox lives alone -- a recluse in her New York City home, drinking too much wine, watching old movies... and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move next door: a father, a mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble -- and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this gripping Hitchcockian thriller, no one and nothing are what they seem."--… (more)
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» See also 118 mentions

English (249)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (2)  Catalan (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (255)
Showing 1-5 of 249 (next | show all)
Great who done it but even better with the Did it really happen? twist. As a fan of Hitchcock, thoroughly enjoyed this book. ( )
  gac53 | Jun 15, 2021 |
This was my first book of 2018, and oh boy did it set a high bar. It's A.J. Finn's debut novel (Finn is a pen name for Dan Mallory, the VP and exec editor of publisher William Morrow) but it reads like it were written by the most seasoned author. Every line of this book was sharp, meaningful and exceedingly well-written. The storyline is incredibly twisty and surprising, and I felt really connected to and invested in the protagonist, Anna.

I will read literally anything that A.J. Finn writes next. ( )
  angelahaupt | Jun 15, 2021 |
“Watching is like nature photography: You don’t interfere with the wildlife”

A fab old-style, whodunit, psychological thriller, full of mystery and potential bad guys at every turn. There’s nothing new here, but I was gripped from the start. I love a gritty page-turner that keeps me up at night, where I keep promising myself just one more page…

I quickly guessed the plot, probably as I’ve read a lot of books like this, but it was still uber fun with many twists – you can’t beat an unreliable narrator with enough wine on-hand to rival Jacob’s Creek.

The only let down for me was the slightly too typical ‘race to survive’ ending – why does the female lead always need to display a sudden weakness? If it’s not stumbling over and shrieking, it’s the failing to suitably kill the bad guy once they’ve gotten hold of a weapon. Don’t we all know to ‘double tap’ by now?!

If you want an exhilarating fast-paced thriller to whittle away a weekend, I’d recommend this – just be prepared to lose some sleep as you will be up most of the night.

Sidenote, can we just talk about the movie adaptation for a mo? What a freaking let-down. Amy Adams was great, but typically Hollywood changed many aspects of the book and created a doozy of a film. The book is waaaaaaayyyyyyyy better! ( )
  moosenoose | Jun 10, 2021 |
I've got mixed feelings about this book. I might need more of a break from the unreliable narrator thing. I won't go into a whole lot of detail because there are so many twists and red herrings that I'm afraid I'll give something away and ruin someone's fun.

Because of the issues the protagonist has, I could never be sure about what was real and what wasn't. That forced me to stop guessing and my favorite part of mysteries is guessing.

There were a few bullshit moments but, I think, the biggest of them all was the final reveal. I get wanting to get that "ah ha!" from a reader but my reaction was more "ugh, what the fuck?!"

The resolution and wrap up at the end was okay but by then, I was mostly over it. Which was really too bad because there were several places in the book that I had other things to do and had to struggle to stop reading or listening.

I went back and forth between the ebook and the audio versions. They each had their strengths and weaknesses. The transcripts from the Agora were much better to read with eyeballs but the narrator definitely added some tension and emotion during the more intense scenes.

If you're a lover of The Girl on the Train and Gone Girl, you'll very likely want to read this. ( )
  amcheri | May 25, 2021 |
Some good twists and turns: some surprising and others a bit more predictable ( )
  Amzzz | May 13, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 249 (next | show all)
A.J. Finn turns out to be the nom de plume for Daniel Mallory, an executive editor at Morrow, the book's publisher, with a special interest in mysteries and film noir. The Woman in the Window is his tribute to both genres and, let me say outright, he does them credit.... What this is is an intelligent, carefully constructed novel of psychological suspense that focuses on a single character whose moods, secrets and fears drive the plot. It's here, in that slow buildup, that Finn/Mallory shows his real talent. He's much more in tune with the intense characters of Minette Walters or Frances Fyfield.... Aside from a visit from a neighbourhood child whose family she's been watching, nothing much happens for more than 100 pages. I confess, I put the book down and might not have gone back but for this review. Other readers may do the same. Please slog on, there is a reason here.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Finn, A. J.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kankaanpää, JaakkoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leon-Berman, BoniDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindell, KlaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Voor George
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Haar man is bijna thuis.
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Ik heb het gevoel dat ergens in jou
iets is waar niemand vanaf weet

Shadow of a Doubt(1943)
"You need me to take care of anything before I go?" It sounds like a proposition, like a line from a noir. You just put your lips together and blow.
At any hour, at all hours, there are at least a few dozen users checked in, a constellation sprawled across the world.
Inside the locket is a tiny photograph, glossy and vivid: a small boy, age four or so, yellow hair in riot, teeth like a picket fence after a hurricane.
As I surface, the dream drains away like water. The memory, really. I try to scoop it up in my palms, but it's gone.
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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"It isn't paranoia if it's really happening... Anna Fox lives alone -- a recluse in her New York City home, drinking too much wine, watching old movies... and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move next door: a father, a mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble -- and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this gripping Hitchcockian thriller, no one and nothing are what they seem."--

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Book description
It isn’t paranoia if it’s really happening . . .

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

Twisty and powerful, ingenious and moving, The Woman in the Window is a smart, sophisticated novel of psychological suspense that recalls the best of Hitchcock.
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