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Otras Inquisiciones (Biblioteca Esencial,…
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Otras Inquisiciones (Biblioteca Esencial, 17) (original 1952; edition 2005)

by Jorge Luis Borges

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539728,377 (4.11)5
Member:Samuel.Sotillo
Title:Otras Inquisiciones (Biblioteca Esencial, 17)
Authors:Jorge Luis Borges
Info:Emece (2005), Paperback
Collections:Your library, Books
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Tags:Books, Poetry, Argentine Writer, Latin American Writer, Jorge Luis Borges

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Other Inquisitions: 1937-1952 by Jorge Luis Borges (1952)

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» See also 5 mentions

English (3)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (7)
Showing 3 of 3
First, my copy of this book is from 1966 and bought at a used bookstore for 45 cents. Once I started reading it, I thought I died and went to heaven. There are some unbelievably great stories in this book. I was thinking "If I could only have one book..", but I would also need access to Wikipedia to make sense of all the obscure references.

My favorites:
The Enigma of Edward FitzGerald-Tells the story of Renaissance Man Omar Khayam, and the man who pulled him out of a dusty corner of oblivion. Touched the theme of reincarnation of Omar into the person of Fitz Gerald.

Chesterton-Previously known to me only for witty one liners, JLB comments on the Father Brown stories and talks up his other fiction writing. Compares him favorably to Poe,saying that Chesterton successfully combined detective stories w elements of horror. There is also an interesting reference to "How I found a Superman." ( )
  delta351 | May 14, 2016 |
Even when writing about an obscure writer or concept, Borges is always an agreeable companion. He spent his entire life absorbing books, both fiction and nonfiction, in every imaginable genre and several languages. His insights are usually clear, and certainly enough to make those of us who enjoy living in our own heads a bit jealous. These essays touch on many of the themes that lie behind his fiction--the nature of reality, the life of their own that books take on when separated from their authors, paradoxes, and ways of organizing things, to name just a few. Many times, he deals with the same subjects in more than on essay, or at least interposes a favorite idea or anecdote that will cause you to make sure you haven't lost your place in the book and are reading an essay you already finished.

The abstract ideas Borges is so fascinated with, however, are usually easier to understand in his fiction. The most interesting essays in this volume tend to be those about authors--Hawthorne, Whitman, Wilde--that you are at least somewhat familiar with. Certainly this is not the place to start an exploration of Borges. That would be his masterpiece FICCIONES. But if you already love his writing, you will find pleasure and a bit of enlightenment among the obscure erudition and repetition. ( )
  datrappert | Jul 21, 2013 |
Alguns dos ensaios em que Borges mais fala de suas preferências literárias e de suas obsessões. ( )
  JuliaBoechat | Mar 30, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Borges, Jorge Luisprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Beeke, AnthonCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pol, Barber van deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tentori Montalto, FrancescoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0292760027, Paperback)

This remarkable book by one of the great writers of our time includes essays on a proposed universal language, a justification of suicide, a refutation of time, the nature of dreams, and the intricacies of linguistic forms. Borges comments on such literary figures as Pascal, Coleridge, Cervantes, Hawthorne, Whitman, Valéry, Wilde, Shaw, and Kafka. With extraordinary grace and erudition, he ranges in time, place, and subject from Omar Khayyam to Joseph Conrad, from ancient China to modern England, from world revolution to contemporary slang.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:38 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

This remarkable book by one of the great writers of our time includes essays on a proposed universal language, a justification of suicide, a refutation of time, the nature of dreams, and the intricacies of linguistic forms. Borges comments on such literary figures as Pascal, Coleridge, Cervantes, Hawthorne, Whitman, Valéry, Wilde, Shaw, and Kafka. With extraordinary grace and erudition, he ranges in time, place, and subject from Omar Khayyam to Joseph Conrad, from ancient China to modern England, from world revolution to contemporary slang.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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