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The People of Sparks

by Jeanne DuPrau

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Books of Ember (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,9441162,193 (3.62)103
Fantasy. Juvenile Fiction. Juvenile Literature. The People of Sparks picks up where The City of Ember leaves off. Lina and Doon have emerged from the underground city to the exciting new world above, and it isn’t long before they are followed by the other inhabitants of Ember. The Emberites soon come across a town where they are welcomed, fed, and given places to sleep. But the town’s resources are limited and it isn’t long before resentment begins to grow between the two groups. When anonymous acts of vandalism push them toward violence, it’s up to Lina and Doon to discover who’s behind the vandalism and why, before it’s too late.… (more)
  1. 00
    Island in the Sea of Time by S. M. Stirling (Wova4)
    Wova4: Both are speculative fiction dealing with communities struggling to survive in environments that require them to be self-sufficient. Island deals with adult themes, so caution is warranted.
  2. 00
    The Wikkeling by Steven Arntson (Tom15Rose3)
    Tom15Rose3: Both are dystopian books and both are amazing (in my opinion)
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English (115)  Spanish (1)  All languages (116)
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After escaping from the underground city of Ember, Lina and Doon are joined by 400 of their fellow Emberites. With little food and no knowledge of life above ground, they stumble upon the city of Sparks, a town with a rocky past of their own. Though the people of Sparks are generous, the Emberites more than double the strain on their own limited resources. When tension mounts and anger begins to flare on both sides, can Lina and Doon help the people of Sparks and the people of Ember avoid war?

I think what I’m seeing in this book is that the author’s desire to insert a theme and to teach kids something she believes in made the story a lot less interesting than it could have been. Exploring the idea that these people have lived their entire lives underground, in a city that was built for them, with technology they never understood, and literally don’t even know what the sun is, much less how seasons work, did take up some of the book, but it fell by the wayside when the “War is bad” motif took over. Yes, war is bad, and yes, in the context of this story, war is what drove the Emberites’ ancestors underground. And it’s what left the people of Sparks in a primitive lifestyle, only now finally able to store excess food for an emergency. However, I’m not sure I buy that the people of Ember, who have just barely survived the death of their city and the stumbling around in a foreign land to find shelter, could produce someone who wanted power for himself and would be willing to incite others to violence to get it. It seemed like the ramping up to a conflict happened really fast.

Following Lina as she tried to understand her vision/memory/whatever about the gleaming city almost seemed like an afterthought. She took a lot of risk and a lot of the story was taken up by her adventure, just for a really minor pay-off.

I do like what ultimately transpired in the climax and the aftermath of that, and frankly, it went better than I expected it to. I anticipated a really simple, heavy-handed resolution, and though what actually happened wasn’t necessarily unique and unexpected, it was nice. And the book ended well, leaving me still interested in the next in the series. While I think this book could have been MUCH better, it’s not a bad follow-up for those who enjoyed the first in the series, and might be more enjoyable for the age group that it’s meant for than it was for me. ( )
  Kristi_D | Sep 22, 2023 |
Lina and Doon have led the citizens of Ember to an exciting new world. They've been given safe haven in a small village called Sparks, a place filled with color and life. But they're not out of danger yet. Although Sparks seems like the answer the long-suffering Emberites have been hoping for, tempers soon escalate. The villagers have never had to share their world before, and it only takes a tiny "spark" to ignite a battle between the two struggling groups. Lina and Doon will have to work together to avoid a disaster not only for their people, but also for the people of Sparks.
  PlumfieldCH | Sep 22, 2023 |
As the people of Ember search for a new home they learn much. They learn of the world and history, of peace and war, but most importantly how to get along with their neighbors. ( )
  David_Fosco | Dec 5, 2022 |
While this was good, I just didn't enjoy it as much as "The City of Embers". I think I had high expectations for this sequel and they just were not met. ( )
  onkristinesshelf | Jun 25, 2022 |
Good second book in the series. ( )
  BarbF410 | May 22, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 115 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
DuPrau, JeanneAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dillon, WendyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riely, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Darkness cannot drive out darkness;
only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate;
only love can do that.
Hate multiplies hate, violence multiplies violence,
and toughness multiplies toughness
in a descending spiral of destruction.

- Martin Luther King, Jr., "Strength to Love," 1963
Dedication
First words
Torren was out at the edge of the cabbage field that day, the day the people came.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Fantasy. Juvenile Fiction. Juvenile Literature. The People of Sparks picks up where The City of Ember leaves off. Lina and Doon have emerged from the underground city to the exciting new world above, and it isn’t long before they are followed by the other inhabitants of Ember. The Emberites soon come across a town where they are welcomed, fed, and given places to sleep. But the town’s resources are limited and it isn’t long before resentment begins to grow between the two groups. When anonymous acts of vandalism push them toward violence, it’s up to Lina and Doon to discover who’s behind the vandalism and why, before it’s too late.

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