HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Passchendaele: The Lost Victory of World War I

by Nick Lloyd

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
861245,192 (3.94)None
"The definitive account of Passchendaele, one of the most influential and tragic battles of the First World War. Passchendaele. The name of a small, seemingly insignificant Flemish village echoes across the twentieth century as the ultimate expression of meaningless, industrialized slaughter. In the summer of 1917, upwards of 500,000 men were killed or wounded, maimed, gassed, drowned, or buried in this small corner of Belgium. On the centennial of the battle, military historian Nick Lloyd brings to vivid life this epic encounter along the Western Front. Drawing on both British and German sources, he is the first historian to reveal the astonishing fact that, for the British, Passchendaele was an eminently winnable battle. Yet the advance of British troops was undermined by their own high command, which, blinded by hubris, clung to failed tactics. The result was a familiar one: stalemate. Lloyd forces us to consider that trench warfare was not necessarily a futile endeavor, and that had the British won at Passchendaele, they might have ended the war early, saving hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of lives. A captivating narrative of heroism and folly, Passchendaele is an essential addition to the literature on the Great War."--provided by publisher.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Passchendaele a New History – Still a History of Military Cruelty on Both Sides

Siegfried Sassoon recorded Passchendaele in his poem Memorial Tablet, when he spoke about on behalf of one of the victims. It has become a byword for the futility and cruelty of war and that is before we get to the mud and slaughter. Passchendaele, or officially, the Third Battle of Ypres, has been reassessed by Nick Lloyd, Nick Lloyd, Reader in Military and Imperial History at King’s College, who is also based at the Joint Services Command and Staff College.

There are no arguments that Passchendaele was a military disaster, and people often ask why the battle took place, the easy answer is because of French pressure on the British, at the same time we cannot overlook the fact that this was occupied France, and they wanted the occupiers gone, understandably. We know that there was mass slaughter in the mud for the allied forces, and it was just as bad for the Germans too. Haig thought that a breakthrough here would allow Allied forces to capture the German submarine base on the Belgium coast as well as making inroads into Belgium. This is rather a traditional argument that Lloyd does not dissent from, but he argues about the tactics used in this battle as he reassesses their use and futility.

Lloyd gives the reader an excellent account of the battle, does not sugar the pill about the slaughter on all sides and to me that is what attractive about this book. Lloyd does not just cover the story from the Allied view but also includes the German viewpoint, so we get a more rounded history and a proper sense of that the battlefield was like. There is no abstract view that historian of the past used, this is in your face realism reminding you there were two sides in this battle, and both suffered as much as the other. I like Lloyd’s view of Haig as a compulsive gambler, who was aiming to win, whereas usually he portrayed as unimaginative in his tactics and kept the battle going to long. But anyone can use hindsight to complain about tactics in the century after the battle, they were not in the heat of battle making the decision.

This one of the best researched and written histories that have been written during the centenary period of the First World War. I cannot recommend this highly enough, it will certainly be an excellent reference point for any historian. ( )
  atticusfinch1048 | Jul 2, 2017 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"The definitive account of Passchendaele, one of the most influential and tragic battles of the First World War. Passchendaele. The name of a small, seemingly insignificant Flemish village echoes across the twentieth century as the ultimate expression of meaningless, industrialized slaughter. In the summer of 1917, upwards of 500,000 men were killed or wounded, maimed, gassed, drowned, or buried in this small corner of Belgium. On the centennial of the battle, military historian Nick Lloyd brings to vivid life this epic encounter along the Western Front. Drawing on both British and German sources, he is the first historian to reveal the astonishing fact that, for the British, Passchendaele was an eminently winnable battle. Yet the advance of British troops was undermined by their own high command, which, blinded by hubris, clung to failed tactics. The result was a familiar one: stalemate. Lloyd forces us to consider that trench warfare was not necessarily a futile endeavor, and that had the British won at Passchendaele, they might have ended the war early, saving hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of lives. A captivating narrative of heroism and folly, Passchendaele is an essential addition to the literature on the Great War."--provided by publisher.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 2
4 4
4.5 1
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 159,172,157 books! | Top bar: Always visible