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The Visitors by Catherine Burns
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The Visitors (edition 2017)

by Catherine Burns (Author)

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12426138,295 (3.21)6
Member:debkrenzer
Title:The Visitors
Authors:Catherine Burns (Author)
Info:Gallery/Scout Press (2017), 304 pages
Collections:read
Rating:****
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The Visitors by Catherine Burns

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I purchased this book from Amazon to read. All opinions are my own. 🌟🌟🌟🌟 The Visitors by Catherine Burns. What a creepy read! The story kind of bounces from past to present and it became frustrating to keep up with Marion's imagination and her reality, but eventually they blend so it doesn't really matter. Marion spends her entire life living in the same house she was born in unable to understand simple things and lead a very sheltered life. After the loss of her mother and years later her brother falling ill she is shocked into dealing with real life issues and most importantly what happened in her cellar. Shocking changes are coming in Marion's future and quickly. Review also posted on Instagram @borenbooks, Library Thing, Go Read, Goodreads/StacieBoren, Amazon, Twitter @jason_stacie and my blog at readsbystacie.com ( )
  SBoren | Sep 18, 2018 |
*I won a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

The description of this book gave me high hopes for a creepy thriller. Unfortunately for me, this book didn’t live up to that. It wasn’t until about 3/4 of the way through the book that the author starts delving into the “visitors” and why they were there. The relationship between Amarion and her brother John is odd, and the reader is able to decipher what is going to happen. However, there were too many minute details about Marion and her experiences that took away from the story. ( )
  JaxlynLeigh | Aug 12, 2018 |
Marion is a sixty-something woman who isn't the sharpest knife in the drawer. She lives with her older brother John in their childhood home. John spends much of his time down in the basement. Marion doesn't like to think about what's going on down in the basement, and mostly ignores the occasional muffled screams and moans emanating therefrom.

This is a creepy novel, and it felt entirely plausible. It reminded me of a tale by Shirley Jackson or Patricia Highsmith, with sociopathic characters hanging onto the fringes of normalcy, with the deep foreboding of an undercurrent of evil beneath the mundane details of the everyday.

Recommended.

3 stars ( )
  arubabookwoman | Jul 27, 2018 |
*I received this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.*

This book is told from the perspective of Marion Zetland, a fifty-ish woman who's never held a job, lives with her controlling (and creepy) brother, and still sleeps with teddy bears. While I have some degree of empathy for Marion (partly because of how she's treated by her mother and brother), I quickly realized that Marion is one of the type of people who I avoid in real life. Not because they're weird, but because they are a bit slow and oblivious to nuance and complications. Marion knows her brother has "visitors" in the cellar who she never sees, but she does hear crying for help on occasion. The pieces of the puzzle are very clear for the reader, yet Marion can't seem to put together the full horror of what her brother has done and when pushed to recognize it, Marion attempts half-steps that are worse than her willful ignorance. Overall, this isn't a bad read if you like suspense, but I was a little deflected by the ending. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Jul 7, 2018 |
This book had a lot of things I usually love going for it. Creepy siblings - check. Kidnapped girls - check. Disturbed family - check. Eerie setting - check. But ultimately I did not care about anyone in this book. And the idea that Marion did not understand what was going on or would be able to suppress recognition of what was happening right under her nose is ridiculous even with limited intelligence. And for her to just throw off her entire personality that we've put up with for 4/5 of the book for that ending? Just, no. Sorry - we readers were just asked to suspend belief in too many things, in my opinion.

(A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.) ( )
  ouroborosangel | May 22, 2018 |
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Book description
Marion Zetland lives with her domineering older brother, John in a decaying Georgian townhouse on the edge of a northern seaside resort. A timid spinster in her fifties who still sleeps with teddy bears, Marion does her best to shut out the shocking secret that John keeps in the cellar.

Until, suddenly, John has a heart attack and Marion is forced to go down to the cellar herself and face the gruesome truth that her brother has kept hidden.

As questions are asked and secrets unravel, maybe John isn't the only one with a dark side.
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"With the smart suspense of Emma Donoghue's Room and the atmospheric claustrophobia of Grey Gardens, Catherine Burns's debut novel The Visitors explores the complex truths we are able to keep hidden from ourselves and the twisted realities that can lurk beneath even the most serene of surfaces. "Once you start Catherine Burns's dark, disturbing, and enthralling debut novel, it's hard to stop. The Visitors is bizarrely unsettling, yet compulsively readable." --Iain Reid, internationally bestselling author of I'm Thinking of Ending Things. Marion Zetland lives with her domineering older brother John in a crumbling mansion on the edge of a northern seaside resort. A timid spinster in her fifties who still sleeps with teddy bears, Marion does her best to live by John's rules, even if it means turning a blind eye to the noises she hears coming from behind the cellar door . . . and turning a blind eye to the women's laundry in the hamper that isn't hers. For years, she's buried the signs of John's devastating secret into the deep recesses of her mind -- until the day John is crippled by a heart attack, and Marion becomes the only one whose shoulders are fit to bear his secret. Forced to go down to the cellar and face what her brother has kept hidden, Marion discovers more about herself than she ever thought possible. As the truth is slowly unraveled, we finally begin to understand: maybe John isn't the only one with a dark side..."--… (more)

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