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No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's…
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No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the… (edition 2017)

by Naomi Klein (Author)

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6022429,611 (3.88)35
"Remember when it all seemed to be getting better? Before Trump happened? What went wrong, and what can we do about it? Naomi Klein - scourge of brand bullies, disaster capitalists and climate liars - shows us how we got to this surreal and dangerous place, how to stop it getting worse and how, if we keep our heads, we can seize the opportunity to make it better. She reveals how Trump is not a freakish aberration, but an extension of the most powerful trends of the last century: celebrity and CEO-worship, Vegas and Guantanamo, soft porn and hard power, fake news and vulture bankers, all rolled into one. His election was not a peaceful transit but a corporate takeover, by people who've knowingly harmed people, societies and our planet. Now their deliberate shock tactics are generating wave after wave of crises, designed to disorientate us and stop us fighting back. This book is the toolkit for shock resistance, giving all of us what we need (including tips such as 'how to jam the brand' and 'kill your inner Trump') to win the argument and right their wrongs. Don't let them get away with it."--… (more)
Member:Convopeace
Title:No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need
Authors:Naomi Klein (Author)
Info:Haymarket Books (2017), 288 pages
Collections:Your library
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No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein

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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
I liked Klein's perspective but a part of me missed referencing and a more academic feel. Definitely worth a read if you are concerned for the impact Trump and his ilk are having on our world. 3 and a half stars. ( )
  StephenKimber | Mar 5, 2021 |
In many ways—about climate change, for example, about which I know less than I want to—this is not a bad book and although I don’t agree or am not sure about many things, overall it’s not a bad purchase or read. However, it is also deeply flawed at times and as I feel I understand those flaws best, that’s what I’m going to address.

If I really wanted to damn Naomi Klein, I’d say that she is suspicious of wealth, regardless of who holds it, why, or even how many people can have that kind of wealth.

First off, let’s say you’re rich. Eww. You’re Trump. Duh. Doesn’t matter who you are, how you got the money, what you do with it, or any of that. You’re rich; you’re Trump. You’re successful? I don’t know I like that.

But, let’s say you have seventy-five cents in your bank account.... and a Twitter account. C’mon everybody, greet The Donald! What, you can’t see the resemblance? (Old West Guy: All I see is a Black Jew. /spits/). Well, C’mon. Trump, Twitter; you, Twitter.... do I really have to use complete sentences?

I guess I just don’t get it. I know that in a perfect world there would be serious limits on free speech for everyone who doesn’t own their own newspaper, but.... Well, at least, that’s what I’ve been told. Of course, at the time, newspapers and newspaper novels (The Victorian Classics) were just Eww, and linguists used to sparse your grammar to see how like the Latin classics it was, instead of comparing it to actual usage, but now that we’re passed snobbery and elitism, right....

Now, granted, sometimes people are noise machines and you shouldn’t aspire to be the Dickensian Man on the Street, but a poet, a philosopher, a king.... But if we’re falling back on snobbery and elitism, why oh why can’t we be rich?

Or if perfection is wrong, why can’t I be me? Now, you know that even people who write books usually have Twitter accounts, just like snobs and gossips are usually married with children, evidence that they were once interested in doing the bad thing. So why is it still bad? I guess that if you really want to be a critic, a really biting critic and not one who cares about comfort, then you have to really hate everyone—be consistent; hate everyone. Including yourself. But, as vain as comfort is, that attitude begs the question: why? If I’m getting damned why does it matter who the judge is, even if it’s me?

Now, people really are ill, and we’ll all collectively destroy ourselves eventually just like we mostly individually destroy ourselves all the time. Granted. Could be climate change, could be annoying one of those four-faced monsters from Ezekiel—eventually, it’ll happen.

But won’t some of us be able to look back with a smile? Maybe you wrote a review or became a vegetarian or something—couldn’t there be something.

No. No, because you’re Trump. Humans are Hitler, people—get used to it! That’s why Downfall parodies are funny!

Naomi Klein doesn’t want reform. She wants a dream. She’s a wonderful, beautiful idealist.... who thinks you’re Trump, because everyone’s Trump.

What do we want—wonderful beautiful idealism! What’s our message to the world, Everyone is Trump!

/shrugs/ But I guess to the extent that politics is a technical field she’s a good reporter; as for her vision, at least it’s worth considering and reading about in order to respect others, a category that I no longer include avowedly Trump materials in, after January 6th. Some books really are garbage and not worth having a discussion about, I have to give the minimalists of intellectualism that. No person is ever 100% damnable because perfect evil isn’t possible, but in terms of /objects/ we can certainly approach “close enough”.

Anyway.
  goosecap | Feb 3, 2021 |
Rating of 4.95. A to-the-point description of the Problem America elected into office. ( )
  Steve_Walker | Sep 13, 2020 |
With the next presidential election approaching, I figured it was time to read this before it (hopefully?) becomes irrelevant. Parts of this book, such as the author's insights into how brands like Trump are structured, are insightful and information I've not encountered elsewhere. Climate change, and how it intersects with other social justice movements, are clearly where the author's passions lay and make for the overriding theme of this book. Admittedly, this book was written over two years ago now, but the concluding optimism feels a little too far-fetched for the current state of affairs. I'm glad I read this one, but considering how much has changed since its publication, I'm not certain how useful this book is for understanding and evaluating current politics. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Aug 2, 2020 |
Klein uses the concepts from her previous books (namely branding, the use of disasters to push through unpalatable agendas and climate change) to needle into Trump, examining his modus operandi and how how the conditions appeared for him to be President.

It works really well and I agree with her central statements that Trump is a symptom of our broken system (which she constantly eviscerates - along with Clinton's/Centrists woeful attempts to offer anything other a than the status quo) and figuratively cutting off his head through impeachment etc will just lead to another (probably less orange) one emerging. Although he should still be called out and protested against, more time and energy needs to be ploughed into more general, progressive and community based programs to try to forge an image of a new future.

Although too recent for her book to mention, Labour's recent success with a manifesto that doesn't sing from the usual neo-liberal hymnsheet and presents a politics of hope shows that more progressive ideas, often seen as political suicide, are actually popular and well received by the public when given a fair hearing. Klein's book is recommended reading if you're feeling depressed by the state of things currently, times are bad but there's definitely seeds of hope. ( )
  arewenotben | Jul 31, 2020 |
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Epigraph
I’m not looking to overthrow the American government,
the corporate state already has.
– John Trudell
Santee Dakota activist, artist and poet (1946-2015)
Dedication
For my mother, Bonnie Sherr Klein,
who teaches me more about shock resilience every day.
First words
Shock.
Quotations
… The two trends – the decline of communal institutions and the expansion of corporate brands in our culture – have had an inverse, seesaw-like relationship to one another over the decades; as the influence of those institutions that provided us with that essential sense of belonging went down, the power of commercial brands went up.

It means that, while our branded world can exploit the unmet need to be part of something larger than ourselves, it can’t fill it in any sustained way: you make a purchase to be part of a tribe, a big idea, a revolution, and it feels good for a moment, but the satisfaction wears off almost before you’ve thrown out the packaging for that new pair of sneakers, that latest model iPhone , or whatever the surrogate is. Then you have to find a way to fill the void again. It’s the perfect formula for endless consumption and perpetual self-commodification through social media, and it’s a disaster for the planet, which cannot sustain these levels of consumption. …
(while we’re at it, we might even spend less time producing and editing our personal brands on social media)
How it could get worse:
… some kind of democracy-avoidance strategy is needed, because many neoliberal policies are so unpopular that people reliably reject them both at the polls and in the streets. With good reason: as the tremendous hoarding (and hiding) of vast sums of wealth by a small and unaccountable global class of virtual oligarchs makes clear, those who benefit most from these radical social restructurings are a small minority, while the majority see their standard of living stagnate or slip, even in periods of rapid economic growth. Which is why, for those who are determined to push through these policies, majority rule and democratic freedoms aren’t a friend – they are a hindrance and a threat.
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"Remember when it all seemed to be getting better? Before Trump happened? What went wrong, and what can we do about it? Naomi Klein - scourge of brand bullies, disaster capitalists and climate liars - shows us how we got to this surreal and dangerous place, how to stop it getting worse and how, if we keep our heads, we can seize the opportunity to make it better. She reveals how Trump is not a freakish aberration, but an extension of the most powerful trends of the last century: celebrity and CEO-worship, Vegas and Guantanamo, soft porn and hard power, fake news and vulture bankers, all rolled into one. His election was not a peaceful transit but a corporate takeover, by people who've knowingly harmed people, societies and our planet. Now their deliberate shock tactics are generating wave after wave of crises, designed to disorientate us and stop us fighting back. This book is the toolkit for shock resistance, giving all of us what we need (including tips such as 'how to jam the brand' and 'kill your inner Trump') to win the argument and right their wrongs. Don't let them get away with it."--

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