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Turtles All the Way Down (Signed Edition) by…
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Turtles All the Way Down (Signed Edition) (edition 2017)

by John Green (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,2231942,184 (3.96)85
Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there's a hundred thousand dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett's son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.… (more)
Member:emwilliams
Title:Turtles All the Way Down (Signed Edition)
Authors:John Green (Author)
Info:Dutton Books for Young Readers (2017), Edition: Limited Signed ed., 304 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

  1. 40
    The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (chwiggy)
  2. 20
    Looking for Alaska by John Green (MarchingBandMan)
    MarchingBandMan: The other quasi-existentialist John Green book. Miles Halter deals with existentialism/nihilism in a different way than Aza Holmes, yet this earlier, rawer YA novel expounds on similar themes.
  3. 10
    Paper Towns by John Green (chwiggy)
  4. 00
    What to Say Next by Julie Buxbaum (Micheller7)
  5. 00
    Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum (Micheller7)
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English (186)  German (2)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (192)
Showing 1-5 of 186 (next | show all)
A good book and happy to see anxiety and OCD portrayed well in a YA fiction, even though I don't think it was particularly beneficial for me personally to read about since my own intrusive thoughts are already working hard to make my life weird. ( )
  mutantpudding | Dec 26, 2021 |
I've read most of John Green's YA novels, and liked them. My daughter wasn't too keen on this one, and I put off reading it until I started reading his new book, The Anthropocene Reviewed. There I learned about his own battle with anxiety and OCD, so decided to read Turtles.

First thing I noticed was that his female protagonist, Aza, talks like a guy. And so does her best friend, Daisy. They do not talk about things the way any females I've ever known talk about them. They sound like John Green, and his male protagonists from other novels. This is a problem for me because Aza is the narrator. I just could never picture her and Daisy as females. I'm wondering why he created a female main character. Was it to distance himself from what he was writing about? I think it would have been better if the main character had been male. Has anyone else noticed this in the, what, five years since it was published?

And though I have personally suffered from anxiety and depression, I was unable to understand the suffering of Aza. I mean, I got it, but I didn't feel it. It felt strange that Aza's Mom was so close, yet so far away. She clearly didn't get it at all, except that she could see her daughter was suffering, without being able to understand what the suffering was about.

Neal Shusterman's Challenger Deep, about his son's battle with schizophrenia, was far more understandable to me, though I have no personal experience with it and anyone close who has it.

So I'd have to say this was my least favorite John Green novel, and I agree with someone that the cover art doesn't help sell it. ( )
  fromthecomfychair | Dec 19, 2021 |
This is the third John Green book I’ve read. Two of the three, this one and “The Fault in Our Stars,” are YA (young adult) books. In fact, that is really what John Green is known for. The audience for this book according to one of the review services is 14 to 18-year-olds, and I would agree with that. The third Green book I read was “The Anthropocene Reviewed.” This is a book of essays and is not considered a YA book, although that age read could certainly read the book. With all of that on the table, I must say my 3/5 star review is from my perspective. I am a 71-year-old retired high school English teacher. Since I retired I haven’t gravitated to YA literature, although while I taught I read a lot of it and recommended much of it to my students. I would certainly have recommended “Turtles All the Way Down” to a 15-year-old ninth grader. For my tastes, however, the book included far too much teenage drama and angst. The main character’s best friend, Daisy, seemed to me to be the caricature of the obnoxious high school female. I’ll give Green credit, though. He obviously knows teens. As I recall, his kids are in that age group or have been recently, so I’m sure that helps. For me, that drama and the super-helicopter mom of the main character, Aza Holmes, was almost more than I could stand. As many professional and reader reviews say, the mental health issues raised in the book are important ones, and that alone makes it worthy of the glowing reviews most have given it. It just isn’t my cup of tea. ( )
  DanDiercks | Dec 10, 2021 |
Think about it: There are more bacteria living, reproducing, defecating, and dying in you and on you -- right now, WHILE YOU'RE READING THIS SENTENCE -- than there are people on the planet.

Think about it. But don't think about it too hard, or too long, or too obsessively.

John Green crawls inside again and creates an honest, gut-wrenching account of a particularly vicious case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder borne by our hero, 16-year-old Aza. Aza fears her thoughts are not her own, and meanwhile, she's trying to live a normal teen's life in Indianapolis with her best friend, Daisy. Green gives us a flawed hero, as he does so well (my favorite of his is Looking for Alaska), and a mystery and a couple of love stories, too. And wash your hands when you're done. ( )
  FinallyJones | Nov 17, 2021 |
My least favorite of Mr. Green's novels thus far. It feels unfinished and in need of more editing and time. ( )
  fionaanne | Nov 11, 2021 |
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John Greenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rudd, KateNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Man can do what he wills, but he cannot will what he wills. -Arthur Schopenhauer
Dedication
To Henry and Alice
First words
At the time I first realized I might be fictional, my weekdays were spent at a publicly funded institution on the north side of Indianapolis called White River High School, where I was required to eat lunch at a particular time -- between 12:37 P.M. and 1:14 P.M. -- by forces so much large than myself that I couldn't even begin to identify them.
Quotations
No one ever says goodbye unless they want to see you again.
But I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell....You think you're the painter, but you're the canvas.
Your now is not your forever.
I thought about him asking me if I'd ever been in love. It's  a weird phrase in English, in love, like it's a sea you drown in or a town you live in. You don't get to be in anything else---in friendship or in anger or in hope. All you can be in is love.
Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.
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Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there's a hundred thousand dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett's son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

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