HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
SantaThing signup ends Monday at 12pm Eastern US. Check it out!
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Loading...

Brave New World (original 1932; edition 1977)

by Aldous Huxley

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
47,09566920 (3.95)1255
Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
Member:renandfiona
Title:Brave New World
Authors:Aldous Huxley
Info:Flamingo (1977), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932)

  1. 774
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (chrisharpe, zasmine, MinaKelly, li33ieg, haraldo, Ludi_Ling, Waldstein)
    zasmine: For Orwell was inspired by it. And Orwell's 1984 is as much of a prize as it.
    li33ieg: 1984, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451: 3 essential titles that remind us of the need to keep our individual souls pure.
    Ludi_Ling: Really, the one cannot be mentioned without the other. Actually, apart from the dystopian subject matter, they are very different stories, but serve as a great counterpoint to one another.
    Waldstein: It's essential to read Huxley's and Orwell's books together. Both present the ultimate version of the totalitarian state, but there the similarities end. While Orwell argues in favour of hate and fear, Huxley suggests that pleasure and drugs would be far more effective as controlling forces. Who was the more prescient prophet? That's what every reader should decide for him- or herself.… (more)
  2. 511
    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (phoenix7g, meggyweg, Babou_wk, haraldo)
    Babou_wk: Contre-utopie, société future où l'unique but de la vie est le bonheur. Toute pratique requérant de la réflexion est bannie.
  3. 282
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (MinaKelly)
  4. 180
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Both are benchmarks for dystopian literature.
  5. 173
    We: A Novel by Yevgeny Zamyatin (hippietrail, tehran)
    hippietrail: The original dystopian novel from which both Huxley and Orwell drew inspiration.
    tehran: Brave New World was largely inspired by Zamyatin's We.
  6. 151
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (afyfe)
  7. 130
    Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley (pyrocow)
  8. 60
    Animal Farm by George Orwell (sturlington)
  9. 71
    Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (sanddancer)
  10. 60
    The Tempest by William Shakespeare (Sylak)
    Sylak: Caliban in The Tempest has many parallels with John the Savage in Brave New World.
  11. 50
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (mcenroeucsb)
  12. 50
    The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster (artturnerjr, KayCliff)
    artturnerjr: If you read only one other dystopian SF story, make it this one (well, you should read 1984, too, but you knew that already, didn't you?).
  13. 40
    This Perfect Day by Ira Levin (KayCliff)
  14. 129
    Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (fundevogel)
  15. 30
    Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang by Kate Wilhelm (rat_in_a_cage)
    rat_in_a_cage: Hinweis auf Rückentext bei »Hier sangen früher Vögel«.
  16. 30
    Daedalus; or, Science and the Future by J. B. S. Haldane (leigonj)
    leigonj: Haldane's ideas of eugenics and ectogenesis, which are laid out alongside others including world government and psychoactive drugs, strongly influenced Huxley's novel.
  17. 30
    Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut (Anonymous user)
  18. 86
    Stranger in a Strange Land (Uncut Edition) by Robert A. Heinlein (meggyweg)
  19. 21
    Men Like Gods by H. G. Wells (Sylak)
    Sylak: Basically a parody of Wells' own book published seven years earlier.
  20. 10
    City of Endless Night by Milo Hastings (fannyprice)
    fannyprice: Both books play with the implications of eugenics and social classes.

(see all 40 recommendations)

Midwest (12)
Read (4)
1930s (2)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1255 mentions

English (610)  Spanish (22)  French (8)  German (6)  Dutch (5)  Portuguese (Brazil) (5)  Catalan (3)  Swedish (2)  Finnish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Slovak (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (666)
Showing 1-5 of 610 (next | show all)
Brave New World is a novel written in 1931 by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. Set in London in the year AD 2540 (632 A.F.—"After Ford"—in the book), the novel anticipates developments in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation, and classical conditioning that combine profoundly to change society. Huxley answered this book with a reassessment in an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958), and with Island (1962), his final novel. In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World fifth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. In 2003, Robert McCrum writing for The Observer included Brave New World chronologically at number 53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time", and the novel was listed at number 87 on the BBC's survey The Big Read. What if the future was a tyranny, but one cleverly person intended to keep the mass of society unaware of this? The people would be provided with several distractions, daily life would be ruled by sex and drugs, and pervasive mass media would suppress the possibility of any original thought: in such a society the ruling elite would not need to fear any kind of rebellion. If you think that Huxley's vision seems to be the way things are in fact turning out, you're not the only one! ( )
  Gmomaj | Nov 15, 2021 |
A Book Speaking to Today

If ever there was a timeless bit of speculative fiction, or science fiction, or prescient fiction, call it what you will, Brave New World (1931) fills the bill. Set aside all the whiz-bang, of which there is considerable amounts, the genetics, which will horrify most, the caste system, yet more to abhor, and you’ll see that Huxley goes to the core issue bedeviling humankind for ages, and certainly front and center this minute in this time; that is, our collective desire for unity, happiness, and, perhaps above all because it makes the first two possible, stability. Many would be willing to forfeit anything for stability to reap the rewards it seems to offer. But, friends, beware; you may find the price dearer than you ever imagined, and almost impossible to reverse or extricate yourself from. Offered as an example, Huxley’s Brave New World, where the synthetic reigns supreme.

Huxley’s Foreword written for the 1946 reissue and appearing in this, and probably other successive editions, deserves your attention. For here, the author acknowledges the single thing he might change, if he were to rewrite the book. Readers will see that he provides the Savage with only two choices, both extreme, and both bad. Either live in the insane and artificial world of lifetime happiness, stability, and voluntary submissiveness; or chose the equally insane, though for different reasons, primitive world. A rewrite might give the Savage a more moderate choice, perhaps like that given to Helmholtz Watson (gladly accepted) and Bernard Marx (greatly feared). However, you might argue and find ready agreement, drawing the starkest contrast illuminates the point more clearly and vividly. Therein lies the beauty of dystopian literature like this. Reasonable alternatives just muddy things, a point World Controller Mustapha Mond certainly would endorse.

It’s interesting to think that Huxley lived nearly half his life, including his last years (he died on November 22, 1963, a most unpropitious date, for certain) in the United States. In other words, he lived during an American period that aspired to and in some ways achieved some of the things he foresaw in Brave New World, in particular the stifling demand for conformity and something of an enforced (by manufacturing and marketing) brand of imposed happiness. You can bet many of those Fifties souls (particularly women and minorities) would have loved a daily ration of soma, which the CIA might have gladly provided in the form of LSD. But, of course, the stuff leaked into society, with folks like Huxley advocating it, not for escapism, a decidedly brave new world pursuit, but for consciousness raising. However, we digress.

Not too far afield, however, as Watson and Marx shared a problem that made it uncomfortable in what the majority felt the perfect world. They, Alpha-Pluses, discovered they were individuals. And therein you have the scariest part of Brave New World: utter conformity, crushing blandness, and a total disconnection from anything resembling real life. So, even today, more than eighty-five years after its first printing, the novel serves as a potent cautionary. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
A Book Speaking to Today

If ever there was a timeless bit of speculative fiction, or science fiction, or prescient fiction, call it what you will, Brave New World (1931) fills the bill. Set aside all the whiz-bang, of which there is considerable amounts, the genetics, which will horrify most, the caste system, yet more to abhor, and you’ll see that Huxley goes to the core issue bedeviling humankind for ages, and certainly front and center this minute in this time; that is, our collective desire for unity, happiness, and, perhaps above all because it makes the first two possible, stability. Many would be willing to forfeit anything for stability to reap the rewards it seems to offer. But, friends, beware; you may find the price dearer than you ever imagined, and almost impossible to reverse or extricate yourself from. Offered as an example, Huxley’s Brave New World, where the synthetic reigns supreme.

Huxley’s Foreword written for the 1946 reissue and appearing in this, and probably other successive editions, deserves your attention. For here, the author acknowledges the single thing he might change, if he were to rewrite the book. Readers will see that he provides the Savage with only two choices, both extreme, and both bad. Either live in the insane and artificial world of lifetime happiness, stability, and voluntary submissiveness; or chose the equally insane, though for different reasons, primitive world. A rewrite might give the Savage a more moderate choice, perhaps like that given to Helmholtz Watson (gladly accepted) and Bernard Marx (greatly feared). However, you might argue and find ready agreement, drawing the starkest contrast illuminates the point more clearly and vividly. Therein lies the beauty of dystopian literature like this. Reasonable alternatives just muddy things, a point World Controller Mustapha Mond certainly would endorse.

It’s interesting to think that Huxley lived nearly half his life, including his last years (he died on November 22, 1963, a most unpropitious date, for certain) in the United States. In other words, he lived during an American period that aspired to and in some ways achieved some of the things he foresaw in Brave New World, in particular the stifling demand for conformity and something of an enforced (by manufacturing and marketing) brand of imposed happiness. You can bet many of those Fifties souls (particularly women and minorities) would have loved a daily ration of soma, which the CIA might have gladly provided in the form of LSD. But, of course, the stuff leaked into society, with folks like Huxley advocating it, not for escapism, a decidedly brave new world pursuit, but for consciousness raising. However, we digress.

Not too far afield, however, as Watson and Marx shared a problem that made it uncomfortable in what the majority felt the perfect world. They, Alpha-Pluses, discovered they were individuals. And therein you have the scariest part of Brave New World: utter conformity, crushing blandness, and a total disconnection from anything resembling real life. So, even today, more than eighty-five years after its first printing, the novel serves as a potent cautionary. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Somehow, I've gone all but 49 years on this planet and was never assigned to read Brave New World. I'm a big fan of dystopian fiction, and I also have a soft-spot for early sci-fi. It's actually quite astounding to me that this book was written 85 years ago. The first part of the book with the clever infodump was fascinating and did not at all seem like a product of it's time. The last quarter of the book (John's discussion with Mustapha Mond) was very MUCH a product of it's time - preachy and heavy-handed; I didn't mind it at that point in the story. (If it had occurred earlier, I probably would've bailed.)
But the most surprising element to me was rampant sexuality (well, for an 85 year old book) - I'm sure that this aspect was quite controversial in 1932.
Overall, I would say that this book has aged quite well - definitely better than I expected it to. I'm going to give it 5 stars for the first 1/4, 4 stars for the last, and 3 for the more plodding parts of the middle. My subjective math averages that out to 3 stars overall.

Audiobook notes: Michael York gave a great reading - I've always been a fan of his acting, but acting experience doesn't always translate into being a good narrator if the various voices necessary can't be made distinct from the actor's normal/expected voice. But Michael York did a very good job with making distinct, identifiable voices. ( )
  KrakenTamer | Oct 23, 2021 |
For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: https://www.ManOfLaBook.com or https://www.instagram.com/manoflabook/

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a classic dystopian science-fiction novel published in 1932. Mr. Huxley was an English author who wrote novels, poems, essays, scripts, and more.

London – 632 AF (After Ford), people are an engineered being, brought into the world through artificial womb and being indoctrinated into predetermined castes. Bernard Marx, a psychologist who has an inferiority complex is questioning society’s use of drugs to keep its citizens peaceful.

Max and his girlfriend, the beautiful Lenina Crowne, take a vacation to New Mexico where they observer natural-born people (savages) who succumb to disease, old age, and practice religion. At the reservation they meet Linda, who also came on a visit and was left behind. Linda is living on the reservation with her son, John.

John has been taught to read, but the only books he has available are a scientific manual and the complete works of William Shakespeare, which he quotes often. Bernard gets permission to take Linda and John back to London. John is now a celebrity, who is connecting to literary persona, but soon become jaded and tries to stop the lower caste from taking soma.

Bernard, and Helmholtz (John’s literary friend) are exiled to the Falkland Islands for antisocial activities, but are told it’s a reward. John moves to an abandoned tower in Puttenham.

It is certainly understandable how Brave New World by Aldous Huxley became a classic. The story is intriguing, and emphatically gives the reader much to think about.

Aldous Huxley dreams up a world which seems eerily familiar almost a decade later. A businessman is being worshiped in a cult like manner (Ford in this case), and society is bred for menial jobs. Subliminal messaging is conditioning the populace unknowingly (much like today’s huge disinformation campaigns). The economic model encourages people to be wasteful (like our society of throw away and buy new). Casual sex is encouraged, and the citizenry is constantly engaged in something (they don’t have cellphones or social media, but that’s a similar idea) just to keep them busy.

In the world Huxley created, there are no banned books, because no one reads. The citizenry is thus drowned in irrelevant things that they wouldn’t know the truth if it hit them on the head. The culture is trivial, but the appetite for distraction, and destruction still exists.

In this Brave New World, there’s no disease, or famine, or hunger, or thirst, or war. There’s plenty of sex to be had, and societal order which many aspire to – but there’s also no freedom. Religious symbols are replaced with worship of a corporate entity (T instead of the cross, for Ford’s model-T). in this age of consumerism, I can certainly see how one’s identify is directly pinned on the products they acquire (iPhones, Rolex, Hummer, etc.).

This is the first time I read this book, and now I understand why people re-read it. I know it would have had a whole different impact on me, or no impact at all, at different stages of my life. ( )
  ZoharLaor | Oct 21, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 610 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (57 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Huxley, Aldousprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Atwood, MargaretIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Binger, CharlesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradshaw, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brochmann, GeorgTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herlitschka, Herberth E.Übersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hernández, RamónTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heuvelmans, TonAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McAfee, MaraIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mok, MauritsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Montagu, AshleyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moody, PaulineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Orras, I. H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rosoman, LeonardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salemme, AttilioCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Snow, GeorgeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Southwick, RobertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Szentmihályi Szabó, PéterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
York, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Les utopies apparaissent bien plus réalisables qu'on ne le croyait autrefois. Et nous nous trouvons actuellement devant une question bien autrement angoissante : comment éviter leur réalisation définitive ?… Les utopies sont réalisables. La vie marche vers les utopies. Et peut-être un siècle nouveau commence-t-il, un siècle où les intellectuels et la classe cultivée rêveront aux moyens d'éviter les utopies et de retourner à une société non utopique moins 'parfaite' et plus libre.
(—Nicholas Berdiaeff)
Dedication
First words
A squat grey building of only thirty-four stories.
Quotations
Unorthodoxy threatens more than the life of a mere individual; it strikes at Society itself.
..."What fun it would be," he thought, "if one didn't have to think about happiness!"
"I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin ... I'm claiming the right to be unhappy". "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen tomorrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." ... "I claim them all".
"All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny."
"No civilisation without social stability. No social stability without individual stability."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Brave New World is by Aldous Huxley. If you have H.G. Wells as the author of Brave New World, please correct your data. Thank you.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Huxley's bleak future prophesized, in Brave New World was a capitalist civilization, which had been reconstituted through scientific and psychological engineering, a world in which people are genetically designed to be passive and useful to the ruling class. Huxley opens the book by allowing the reader to eavesdrop on the tour of the Fertilizing Room of the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning center, where the high tech reproduction takes place. Bernard Marx (one of the characters in the story) seems alone, harboring an ill-defined longing to break free. Satirical and disturbing, Brave New World is set some 600 years into the future. Reproduction is controlled through genetic engineering, and people are bred into a rigid class system. As they mature, they are conditioned to be happy with the roles that society has created for them. Concepts such as family, freedom, love, and culture are considered grotesque.
Haiku summary

Legacy Library: Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See Aldous Huxley's legacy profile.

See Aldous Huxley's author page.

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.95)
0.5 11
1 169
1.5 42
2 612
2.5 130
3 2584
3.5 574
4 4846
4.5 528
5 3991

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,367,761 books! | Top bar: Always visible