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The Dialogues: Conversations about the Nature of the Universe (The MIT…

by Clifford V. Johnson

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632342,225 (2.9)None
"In this graphic book/novel, readers eavesdrop on conversations about contemporary science and learn about how scientists uncover the secrets of the universe. Topics in the book range from black holes, to the multiverse, to string theory, to food science. The book is structured as a set of 9 conversations in 11 chapters. The people in the conversations include non-experts and experts in physics, both adults and children, both male and female. These characters are fictional. The locations are in cities around the world, in cafes, train stations, on the street, buses, museums, libraries. The book is, uniquely for this subject matter, a fully graphic book. A graphic novel, but NOT science fiction. The science is real, and often concerns research topics that have been highlighted in general-interest media outlets"--… (more)
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Surely the most unusual physics/cosmology volume ever: serious conversations presented in a graphic-novel (comic-book) format. The second half gets into some very advanced, recently developed concepts. End-of-chapter notes provide plenty of references to more conventional books. The visual appeal is high, and people who are female and/or black are well represented among the depicted interlocutors. Perhaps the book's biggest negative is that the time needed to get through it is too short.
  fpagan | Mar 14, 2019 |
This book has an interesting concept of discussing some hot scientific topics (Black Holes, String Theory, etc.) in the much more accessible format of a graphic novel. But beyond the initial concept, the execution just didn't meet the expectations or the possibilities of what this book could have been.

One of the strengths of a graphic novel is the ability to show movement, emotion, and use all the power of pictures -- worth a thousand words right? But this graphic novel ended up being images of very stilted people having conversations about theoretical physics. One of the problems is that the author is not a very good artist, so compared to other graphic novels, the images are really lacking. The conversations also range from simple science experiments to difficult magnetic field theory, so I can't imagine who the target audience is for this book. Even with years of Physics under my belt, I waffled between being a little bored to 'what?'

I'm sort of surprised by the high reviews of this book. It was our book club selection and was panned by all but one person in my book club. Hoping that the idea of non-fiction in graphic novel format finds a better implementation. ( )
  jmoncton | Aug 16, 2018 |
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"In this graphic book/novel, readers eavesdrop on conversations about contemporary science and learn about how scientists uncover the secrets of the universe. Topics in the book range from black holes, to the multiverse, to string theory, to food science. The book is structured as a set of 9 conversations in 11 chapters. The people in the conversations include non-experts and experts in physics, both adults and children, both male and female. These characters are fictional. The locations are in cities around the world, in cafes, train stations, on the street, buses, museums, libraries. The book is, uniquely for this subject matter, a fully graphic book. A graphic novel, but NOT science fiction. The science is real, and often concerns research topics that have been highlighted in general-interest media outlets"--

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