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The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1893)

by Arthur Conan Doyle, Leslie S. Klinger (Editor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Sherlock Holmes (4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,842652,213 (4.11)158
"This collection includes many of the most familiar cases Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson ever solve, including "Silver Blaze," "The Greek Interpreter," and "The Musgrave Ritual." As Holmes's fame grows, it brings him a notoriety that piques the ire of London's criminal underworld, who begin to scheme against him. It is in "The Final Problem" that Dr. Watson relates the grisly, fatal, and shocking tale of how Holmes finally meets his match, encountering the diabolical Professor Moriarty in a terrible struggle at Reichenbach Falls"--… (more)

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» See also 158 mentions

English (62)  Swedish (1)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
Another Sherlock Holmes book, another wonderful read. This collection of short stories mainly serves to humanise Holmes. He did not, as some readers may have believed up to this point, pop into existence as a fully grown consulting detective. We hear of his first case as a young man, we hear how he struggled to get any work early on in his career, and we even meet his brother, whose deductive powers surpass even Sherlock's. And of course, most humanising of all, we hear how Sherlock Holmes dies.

Or do we!

The tales in this work are almost all lovely little reads. Their beginnings err towards the formulaic at times, with three or four stories starting with Watson explaining how he hadn't seen Holmes during the first few months after his marriage, but then that Summer... etc. Either Victorian Summers were a lot longer than modern ones or Watson had been indulging in some of Holmes' cocaine and got his dates mixed up.

The only tale I wasn't overly fond of was the last and most famous one in the book: The Final Problem. This is where we meet Professor Moriarty, and Holmes takes down both him and his entire criminal network, albeit at the cost of his own life as he and Moriarty apparently plunge to their deaths over the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. If Conan Doyle's aim was to kill off Holmes but in a blaze of glory then this seems an odd way to do it. It's hard to think of Holmes' act as a worthy sacrifice because that depends on us believing that Moriarty is a man whose death is worth the loss of Sherlock Holmes. But at this stage of the canon we've spent some thousand pages learning of Holmes' feats, but only about five pages hearing that "Oh by the way, Moriarty is really bad. Really really bad. Like, the baddest. Seriously." It's the equivalent of introducing a new character five minutes from the end of the last episode of series ten of a TV programme, and having the main character say "Oh noes, you're the worst person ever, quick, let's fight to the death!" Hardly a satisfying conclusion. And given the fact that there are enough holes in Holmes' death to let Conan Doyle bring him back in two books time, he may as well have just had Holmes retire to his bees. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Another Sherlock Holmes book, another wonderful read. This collection of short stories mainly serves to humanise Holmes. He did not, as some readers may have believed up to this point, pop into existence as a fully grown consulting detective. We hear of his first case as a young man, we hear how he struggled to get any work early on in his career, and we even meet his brother, whose deductive powers surpass even Sherlock's. And of course, most humanising of all, we hear how Sherlock Holmes dies.

Or do we!

The tales in this work are almost all lovely little reads. Their beginnings err towards the formulaic at times, with three or four stories starting with Watson explaining how he hadn't seen Holmes during the first few months after his marriage, but then that Summer... etc. Either Victorian Summers were a lot longer than modern ones or Watson had been indulging in some of Holmes' cocaine and got his dates mixed up.

The only tale I wasn't overly fond of was the last and most famous one in the book: The Final Problem. This is where we meet Professor Moriarty, and Holmes takes down both him and his entire criminal network, albeit at the cost of his own life as he and Moriarty apparently plunge to their deaths over the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. If Conan Doyle's aim was to kill off Holmes but in a blaze of glory then this seems an odd way to do it. It's hard to think of Holmes' act as a worthy sacrifice because that depends on us believing that Moriarty is a man whose death is worth the loss of Sherlock Holmes. But at this stage of the canon we've spent some thousand pages learning of Holmes' feats, but only about five pages hearing that "Oh by the way, Moriarty is really bad. Really really bad. Like, the baddest. Seriously." It's the equivalent of introducing a new character five minutes from the end of the last episode of series ten of a TV programme, and having the main character say "Oh noes, you're the worst person ever, quick, let's fight to the death!" Hardly a satisfying conclusion. And given the fact that there are enough holes in Holmes' death to let Conan Doyle bring him back in two books time, he may as well have just had Holmes retire to his bees. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
I just don't like ACD's writing style. Very dry. ( )
  locriian | May 4, 2020 |
This collection isn't quite as good as "The Adventures", but in some ways it shows a continued improvement in Doyle's overall style.Many stories open with a more interesting description of the season, the times, or the relationship of our two central characters. (Watson's discussion of Holmes' neatness and simultaneous messiness in 'The Musgrave Ritual' is marvellous!)

After my bad experiences with the first two books, I can't believe that I now look forward to every Holmes and Waston story, and yet I do. Every story in this volume is interesting and enjoyable, however more than a few have a tendency to slip back into the fantastic and melodramatic modes that coloured "The Sign of the Four" and "A Study in Scarlet". (most notably 'The Yellow Face').

Strangely, the only story I didn't really enjoy was 'Silver Blaze' which is, I understand, quite popular. 'The Final Problem', on the other hand, is delightful in its descriptive passages, and the unique situation of seeing Holmes in such danger. A very good read. ( )
  therebelprince | Apr 27, 2020 |
4.5 stars. Another strong collection of short stories. Some of these tales have a lot going on, with intrigue and mystery and confusion running through them. Others are more straightforward, even simple. One of the charms in this collection, for me, was this difference from one story to the next. Some tales felt like complete adventures, while other were more like snapshots. This was a nice mix. I found “Silver Blaze” and “The Musgrave Ritual” to be quite memorable, and Sherlock’s heartfelt speech about the hope and beauty that one finds in flowers remains one of my favorite moments in the whole saga. Finally, I won’t spoil anything here, but the adventures that Watson and Holmes share in “The Final Problem” are among the most compelling of anything in the series. Amazing. ( )
  MuuMuuMousie | Apr 19, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 62 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Arthur Conan Doyleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Klinger, Leslie S.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Jacobi, Sir DerekNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paget, SidneyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roden, ChristopherEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spencer, AlexanderNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
'I am afraid, Watson, that I shall have to go,' said Holmes, as we sat down together to our breakfast one morning.
Quotations
The public not unnaturally goes on the principle that he who would heal others must himself be whole.
It was a long two minutes before Grant Munro broke the silence, and when his answer came it was one of which I love to think. He lifted the little child, kissed her, and then, still carrying her, he held his other hand out to his wife and turned towards the door.
'We can talk it over more comfortably in the home,' said he. 'I am not a very good man, Effie, but I think that I am a better one than you have given me credit for being.'
A man always finds it hard to realise that he may have finally lost a woman's love, however badly he may have treated her.
'I don't think you need alarm yourself,' said I. 'I have usually found that there was method in his madness.'
'You are the stormy petrel of crime, Watson.'
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for Arthur Conan Doyle's short story collection The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Please do not combine with any abridgement, adaptation, omnibus containing additional works, etc.
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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141035439, 0143120158, 0241952948

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1907832602, 1907832610

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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