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The Republic

by Plato

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Plato: Verzameld werk (9)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
18,014109191 (3.85)281
Essestially an inquiry into morality, the Republic is the central work of the Western world's most famous philosopher. Containing crucial arguments and insights into many other areas of philosophy, it is also a literary masterpiece: the philosophy is presented for the most part for ordinaryreaders, who are carried along by the wit and intensity of the dialogue and by Plato's unforgettable images of the human condition. This new, lucid translation is complemented by full explanatory notes and an up-to-date critical introduction.… (more)
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    Politics by Aristotle (Voracious_Reader)
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    The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli (caflores)
  3. 40
    Political Writings by John Locke (Voracious_Reader)
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    Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal (original 1966 edition) by Ayn Rand (mcaution)
    mcaution: Tired of Philosopher-Kings? Think individual rights aren't practical? Find insights in Rand's essays, "Man's Rights" and "The Nature of Government" among many others.
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» See also 281 mentions

English (86)  Spanish (12)  French (4)  Catalan (2)  Italian (2)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (109)
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
The foundational philosophical book that covers the various definitions of justice; the types of political regimes, and the inner makeup of the individual soul. It provides the first outlines of what we would now term as political science.

This work can provoke a wide variety of responses from an approval of a farseeing progressive prophet of sorts to; on the opposite end, utter horror at the outline for a dystopian nightmare.

It deals both with ontology, being, and telos, end; it probes issues of nature versus nurture and of the role of education.

A book worth reading, arguing with, and thinking about. There is barely a topic on life, including modern life, that is not touched upon in the Republic. ( )
  MusicforMovies | Apr 6, 2021 |
Plato obviously has the quarrel with Homer where story, which had always been dominant, gets challenged by philosophy for the first time. But in some ways Plato is quite balanced in terms of the purpose of philosophy and the life of the mind.

On the one hand he speaks out against being a valetudinarian where the only purpose of life is health— where you spend your whole life doing nothing but trying not to die or feel any discomfort before eventually failing in this your only goal. This can be like until I just been said about “housewife-ery expanding to fill the time available”: in other words if all you do is cook and clean and maybe watch TV then you’ll find things to cook, things to clean and things to watch on TV until you don’t have time left to do anything else—until the only thing left is your private comfort.

On the other hand, and without knowing too much about them, unfortunately, Plato is not I think like Kant and Hegel and the philosophers of the 18th century; it’s not about thinking about nothing else except the act of thinking until you die having done nothing but thought. Plato is clear that his guardians are not philosophers only; they have to be soldiers, which means attending to the body; and they have to fulfill a life of service in politics not because politics ought to reward those to do the politicking, but because it ought to be done by the best people, men and women, for the sake of the community and in its service.

The mind is therefore not something to be forgotten, or something to be cultivated in privileged isolation, but a necessary tool for the improvement of people.
  goosecap | Apr 5, 2021 |
How profound and all-encompassing this book is. If this is what philosophy is supposed to be, make it double! ( )
  Adrianmb | Mar 24, 2021 |
A Socratic dialogue, authored by Plato around 375 BC, concerning justice, the order and character of the just city-state, and the just man. It is Plato's best-known work, and has proven to be one of the world's most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually and historically.

In the dialogue, Socrates talks with various Athenians and foreigners about the meaning of justice and whether the just man is happier than the unjust man. They consider the natures of existing regimes and then propose a series of different, hypothetical cities in comparison, culminating in Kallipolis, a utopian city-state ruled by a philosopher-king. They also discuss the theory of forms, the immortality of the soul, and the role of the philosopher and of poetry in society. The dialogue's setting seems to be during the Peloponnesian War. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Mar 2, 2021 |
Strange how something written 2500 years ago can feel so modern, but as a friend told me, politics is always politics.

There are several themes in this book that I picked up. There is the attempts to define justice, or right-wrong, just-unjust.

There are the attempts to define the optimal civilization. Sounds a bit naïve, but interesting thought experiment.

There are discussions about pain and pleasure and the relative nature of them.

There are discussions about the flaws in various forms of governments, which focuses on a aristocracy/monarchy controlled by humble philosophers as the optimal, or only working government form.

All of these discussions are interesting, and few things are obsolete. ( )
  bratell | Dec 25, 2020 |
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» Add other authors (446 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Platoprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allan, D. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Allen, Robert E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Apelt, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ķemere, InāraEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baccou, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blakewell, Charles M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bloom, AllanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buchanan, Scott MilrossIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burnet, JohnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Camarero, AntonioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cornford, Francis MacdonaldTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davies, John LlewelynTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ferrari, G. R. F.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraccaroli, GiuseppeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grayling, A. C.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Griffith, TomTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grou, Jean NicolasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grube, G.M.A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Itkonen-Kaila, MarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jowett, BenjaminTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Koolschijn, GerardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kredel, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
La Pillonnière, François deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Larson, RaymondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, DesmondIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, DesmondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindsay, Alexander D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lukstiņš, GustavsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Molegraaf, MarioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nehamas, AlexanderIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pabón, José ManuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reeve, Charles D. C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rouse, W. H. D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schleiermacher, FriedrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scott, William C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shorey, PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Slings, S. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spens, HarryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sterling, Richard W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vaughan, David J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warren, HansTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Waterfield, RobinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whewell, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zariņš, VilnisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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I went down yesterday to the Piraeus with Glaucon, son of Ariston, that I might offer up my prayers to the goddess, and also because I wanted to see in what manner they would celebrate the festival, which was a new thing. (Benjamin Jowett's translation)
The main question to be answered in the Republic is: What does Justice mean, and how can it be realized in human society? [tr. Cornford]
Quotations
...justice is keeping what is properly one's own and doing one's own job. (Desmond Lee translation)
...the state whose prospective rulers come to their duties with least enthusiasm is bound to have the best and most tranquil government and the state whose rulers are eager to rule the worst. (Desmond Lee translation)
...no one who had not exceptional gifts could grow into a good man unless he were brought up from childhood in a good environment and trained in good habits. Democracy...sweeps all this away and doesn't mind what the habits and background of its politicians are; provided they profess themselves the people's friends, they are duly honored. (Desmond Lee translation)
...an excessive desire for liberty at the expense of everything else is what undermines democracy and leads to the demand for tyranny. (Desmond Lee translation)
...all the poets from Homer downwards have no grasp of truth but merely produce a superficial likeness of any subject they treat, including human excellence. (Desmond Lee translation)
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Disambiguation notice
The original Ancient Greek title was 'Πολιτεία', though most editions in the original Classical Greek have the Latin title, 'Respublica'. Neither should be combined with this translated entry (Modern Greek editions should be here, however).
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Essestially an inquiry into morality, the Republic is the central work of the Western world's most famous philosopher. Containing crucial arguments and insights into many other areas of philosophy, it is also a literary masterpiece: the philosophy is presented for the most part for ordinaryreaders, who are carried along by the wit and intensity of the dialogue and by Plato's unforgettable images of the human condition. This new, lucid translation is complemented by full explanatory notes and an up-to-date critical introduction.

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"Nel mondo antico e poi ancora in quello moderno, "La Repubblica" non ha mai mancato di svolgere il suo compito principale: quello di invitare a pensare sul destino della vita individuale e sociale degli uomini. Un destino, secondo Platone, non prescritto e immutabile, ma da immaginare, argomentare, costruire." 
(piopas)
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Yale University Press

2 editions of this book were published by Yale University Press.

Editions: 0300114516, 0300136374

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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