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Myths on the Map: The Storied Landscapes of Ancient Greece

by Greta Hawes (Editor)

Other authors: Emma Aston (Contributor), Julie Baleriaux (Contributor), Daniel W. Berman (Contributor), Richard Buxton (Contributor), Katherine Clarke (Contributor)10 more, Charles Delattre (Contributor), Robert L. Fowler (Contributor), Richard L. Hunter (Contributor), Stephanie Larson (Contributor), Jeremy McInerney (Contributor), Elizabeth Minchin (Contributor), Betsey A. Robinson (Contributor), Christina A. Salowey (Contributor), Aara Suksi (Contributor), Iris Sulimani (Contributor)

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Polybius boldly declared that 'now that all places have become accessible by land or sea, it is no longer appropriate to use poets and writers of myth as witnesses of the unknown' (4.40.2). And yet, in reality, the significance of myth did not diminish as the borders of the known world expanded. Storytelling was always an inextricable part of how the ancient Greeks understood their environment; mythic maps existed alongside new, more concrete, methods of charting the contours of the earth. Specific landscape features acted as repositories of myth and spurred their retelling; myths, in turn, shaped and gave sense to natural and built environments, and were crucial to the conceptual resonances of places both unknown and known. This volume brings together contributions from leading scholars of Greek myth, literature, history, and archaeology to examine the myriad intricate ways in which ancient Greek myth interacted with the physical and conceptual landscapes of antiquity. The diverse range of approaches and topics highlights in particular the plurality and pervasiveness of such interactions. The collection as a whole sheds new light on the central importance of storytelling in Greek conceptions of space.… (more)
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Myths on the Map, which originated in a 2013 conference at Bristol University, attempts to make good the editor’s claim that “myth-making blended into map-making” (2). To this end, fifteen studies, arranged in no particular order, explore how ancient Greek mythmakers and artisans engaged a bundle of kindred concepts: inter alia, space, place, maps, geography, landmark, and landscape. The essays vary in scope and quality, and several, though stimulating in their own right, appear only marginally invested in the central theme.
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hawes, GretaEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aston, EmmaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baleriaux, JulieContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Berman, Daniel W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Buxton, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clarke, KatherineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Delattre, CharlesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fowler, Robert L.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hunter, Richard L.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Larson, StephanieContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McInerney, JeremyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Minchin, ElizabethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Robinson, Betsey A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Salowey, Christina A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Suksi, AaraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sulimani, IrisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Polybius boldly declared that 'now that all places have become accessible by land or sea, it is no longer appropriate to use poets and writers of myth as witnesses of the unknown' (4.40.2). And yet, in reality, the significance of myth did not diminish as the borders of the known world expanded. Storytelling was always an inextricable part of how the ancient Greeks understood their environment; mythic maps existed alongside new, more concrete, methods of charting the contours of the earth. Specific landscape features acted as repositories of myth and spurred their retelling; myths, in turn, shaped and gave sense to natural and built environments, and were crucial to the conceptual resonances of places both unknown and known. This volume brings together contributions from leading scholars of Greek myth, literature, history, and archaeology to examine the myriad intricate ways in which ancient Greek myth interacted with the physical and conceptual landscapes of antiquity. The diverse range of approaches and topics highlights in particular the plurality and pervasiveness of such interactions. The collection as a whole sheds new light on the central importance of storytelling in Greek conceptions of space.

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