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Bringing Maggie Home: A Novel by Kim Vogel…
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Bringing Maggie Home: A Novel (edition 2017)

by Kim Vogel Sawyer (Author)

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"Ten-year-old Hazel takes her three-year-old sister to pick berries in a blackberry thicket in 1943, and only one of them comes home again. Young Hazel's world crumbles, the weight of the guilt from that colors every relationship in her life for the next seventy years. But now Hazel's granddaughter Meghan is a cold case agent and has an opportunity to investigate this very personal family mystery. What she uncovers could provide healing for three generations of women"--… (more)
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This is an interesting story, shared by three generations of women. I found it challenging sometimes, since it switches viewpoints among the three women. Still, it is a captivating story. ( )
  WendyKA | Jul 12, 2020 |
3.5 stars

Bringing Maggie Home by Kim Vogel Sawyer is a bittersweet novel of healing for three generations of mothers and daughters.

In rural Arkansas in 1943, Hazel DeFord's younger sister Maggie vanishes while the two girls are picking blackberries. This one event defines Hazel's life to the extent that her only daughter, Diane, seethes with resentment over her mother's over protectiveness. In turn, Diane's relationship with her daughter, Meghan, is also affected as Diane's attempts not to be anything like Hazel take her to the other end of the parenting spectrum. When these three women end up under the same roof while Meghan recovers from a car accident, can the fractures in these relationships be repaired?

Despite Diane's somewhat aloof mothering, Meghan is a warm, caring and quite well adjusted young woman. She absolutely adores her grandmother and her fondest childhood memories revolve around her summer visits with Hazel. In recent years, she has not spent as much time with Hazel as she would like, so Meghan is eagerly looking forward to convalescing from her accident with her grandmother. Needless to say, the last person she expects to see upon her arrival at Hazel's house is Diane. Which begs the question: why is Diane here?

Well, the answer to that question definitely paints Diane in a very unflattering light. Her anger and bitterness toward Hazel have not abated despite the passage of time and she snipes and snaps at her mother at every turn. Diane is a downright unpleasant character whose attitude is absolutely ridiculous since she is now an adult and should seriously have let go of her resentment YEARS ago. Her jealousy over Hazel and Meghan's close relationship quickly grows tiresome as does her inability to feel any type of empathy for her mother's loss.

Should Hazel have attempted to explain to Diane why she was so worried about her daughter's safety? Of course. But in all honesty, she has a valid, albeit slightly skewed, reason for not revealing this traumatic secret. Hazel's actions stem from love and fear and although it is perfectly understandable that Diane would chafe at her mother's long ago restrictions, her present day reaction is over the top and completely out of proportion now she is a middle aged adult.

The mystery about what happened to young Maggie is quite interesting. Although it is fairly easy to guess what happened to her, Meghan and her partner Sean's investigation into the long ago disappearance is fascinating. While their chances at uncovering the truth are slim due to the passage of time, no matter how tenuous, they pursue every lead they uncover.

With a strong undercurrent of faith, Bringing Maggie Home is heartwarming novel of redemption and forgiveness. Although it is difficult to like Diane, Meghan and Hazel are enjoyable characters who share warm and loving relationship. Maggie's story arc is quite fascinating and the investigation into her disappearance is quite engrossing. The various storylines are completely wrapped up by the novel's conclusion and readers will love Kim Vogel Sawyer's sweet epilogue. ( )
  kbranfield | Feb 3, 2020 |
If you are going to write and publish fiction that is also a religious tract, it would be polite to mention that in the advertising blurbs. While the preaching is mild in the first half of the book, it grows and takes over towards the end. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Dec 12, 2019 |
“Bringing Maggie Home” is a powerful and poignant tale of heartbreaking loss and ultimate healing and redemption through love and abiding faith. This is a beautifully-written tale, enriched by author Kim Vogel Sawyer’s exquisite storytelling. Hazel DeFord knows that a moment’s mistake can lead to a lifetime of regret. As a ten-year-old girl in1943, Hazel lost sight of her of three-year-old sister, Maggie, and the toddler vanished. Seven decades later, still eaten up by an unrelenting guilt, Hazel is distanced from her own daughter, Diane, but close to her granddaughter, Meghan, a cold-case investigator. When an accident forces Meghan to take a leave of absence, three generations of DeFord women find themselves in one another’s company, with Meghan the mediator between her mother and grandmother. This is a chance for family secrets and personal issues to be aired and for cobwebs of doubt to be swept away. Will it also lead to a final resolution of the unsolved case of Maggie’s disappearance? “Bringing Maggie Home” is a wonderful and inspiring read for those who enjoy family drama with added elements of mystery.

Book Copy Gratis via Blogging for Books ( )
  gincam | Mar 27, 2019 |
I am a big fan of Ms. Sawyer. I so loved and would recommend Bringing Maggie Home.

Sometimes when an author writes about two different time periods, you may find yourself having trouble keeping up. That is not true with this story. Kim has a way of intertwining contemporary and historical settings, she makes it seem flawless.

This story for me had everything. My favorite part of Kim's writing, she always weaves a thread of faith throughout her story. Bringing Maggie Home is a little different than most of Kim's previous works. It is about two separate time periods, seventy years apart. It is about solving a mystery. It is about three generations of women, mother, daughter and grandmother. They could not be anymore different from each other. There is love, bitterness, suspense and intrigue present. I could not wait to read this book by Kim and now that I am done, I hate that it has ended. What a great read. ( )
  Sandralb | Sep 19, 2018 |
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"Ten-year-old Hazel takes her three-year-old sister to pick berries in a blackberry thicket in 1943, and only one of them comes home again. Young Hazel's world crumbles, the weight of the guilt from that colors every relationship in her life for the next seventy years. But now Hazel's granddaughter Meghan is a cold case agent and has an opportunity to investigate this very personal family mystery. What she uncovers could provide healing for three generations of women"--

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