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The Anglo-Saxon chronicle by George Norman…
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The Anglo-Saxon chronicle (edition 1953)

by George Norman Garmonsway

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430None24,551 (4.11)12
Member:timspalding
Title:The Anglo-Saxon chronicle
Authors:George Norman Garmonsway
Info:London, Dent; [1953] xlviii, 295 p. facsim. 19 cm.
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:medieval, medieval history, history, translations, z4, z5

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The Anglo-Saxon chronicle by Anonymous (Author)

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» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
This is the coffee table book conflation of the five principal versions of the Chronicle. The illustrations are good, and the genealogies are sometimes masterpieces of the heralds ability to please the customer. You have to fudge it a bit when the desire is to have both Adam and Odin as your ancestor! Quote from the Garmonsway collection for scholarly credit, however. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Oct 12, 2013 |
This edition of the chronicles (journal) written by Anglo Saxons from the seventh to eleventh centuries is especially valuable for the sidebars and excellent illustrations. If you want to own a copy of the Chronicles, get this one! ( )
  LichenCraig | Feb 4, 2012 |
GB/UK/Great Britain - History - To 1066 - Chronology/Great Britain - History - Norman period, 1066-1154 - Chronology
  SGSLibrary | Aug 16, 2010 |
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, as translated by Anne Savage, are a very important historical source document for the history of Britain. The Chroniclers wrote their manuscripts in the late 9th century, and heavily relied on the works of the Venerable Bede for the historical events prior to their time. Everything afterwards, the Chroniclers wrote with gusto--the events of kings, the gradual rise of Christianity, the invasions of the Vikings (Danes) and the Normans in 1066. Everything that the Chroniclers documented -- from royal feuds to the "bearded star" or Haley's Comet flashing in the skies, everything was important to them and to their individuality. Savage translates a wonderful narrative that captures the essence of what it was like living in Anglo-Saxon England. ( )
1 vote philae_02 | Apr 18, 2010 |
some quotations ( )
  deacsilvia17 | Jun 7, 2009 |
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» Add other authors (53 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
AnonymousAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Garmonsway, G.N.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingram, JamesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savage, AnneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Swanton, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Swanton, MichaelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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(Dedication to the Michael Swanton edition:)

To my family and friends I am perpetually indepted. If this edition needs a dedication then it should be to the saints and demons of the word processor. It seems to be a truism of our times that while to err may be human, to really louse things up takes a computer.
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Preface (to the Michael Swanton edition):

This book's immediate predecessor, the edition and translation of the late Professor Garmonsway published by J. M. Dent in Everyman's Library in 1953, served several generations of historians and students of literature not yet familiar with the original language but needing an entrée to this most remarkable of early texts.
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The Rev. James Ingram was a fellow of Oxford College in the early 19th Century and professor of Anglo-Saxon. He is not to be confused with James C. Ingram, the author of International Economics. His 1823 translation of The Anglo Saxon Chronicle is not the same translation as that of Anne Savage (1982) or that of Michael Swanton (1996), though it is a translation of the same work, more or less (various manuscript traditions).

The translation by James Ingram is not the translation by Anne Savage.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0415921295, Paperback)

The first continuous national history of any western people in their own language, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle traces the history of early England from the migration of the Saxon war-lords, through Roman Britain, the onslaught of the Vikings, the Norman Conquest and on through the reign of Stephen.

Michael Swanton's translation is the most complete and faithful reading ever published. Extensive notes draw on the latest evidence of paleographers, archaeologists and textual and social historians to place these annals in the context of current knowledge. Fully indexed and complemented by maps and genealogical tables, this edition allows ready access to one of the prime sources of English national culture. The introduction provides all the information a first-time reader could need, cutting an easy route through often complicated matters. Also includes nine maps.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:45:10 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is the first continuous national history of any western people in their own language. Compiled over several centuries, it traces the migration of Saxon warlords to Roman Britain, their gradual development of a settled society and conversion to Christianity, the onslaught of the Vikings and then the Norman Conquest. It continued to be written long after the last Saxon king was dead, and goes on to describe atrocities perpetrated by the barons during the reign of Stephen." "Professor Swanton's translation is the most complete and faithful reading ever published. Extensive notes draw on the latest evidence of paleographers, archaeologists, and textual and social historians to place these annals in the context of current knowledge. The introduction provides all the information a first-time reader could need, cutting an easy route through often complicated matters. Fully indexed and complemented by maps and genealogical tables, this edition allows ready access to one of the prime sources of English national culture."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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