HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With…
Loading...

Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha (edition 2004)

by Tara Brach (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8591318,069 (4.08)14
"Believing that something is wrong with us is a deep and tenacious suffering," says Tara Brach at the start of this illuminating book. This suffering emerges in crippling self-judgments and conflicts in our relationships, in addictions and perfectionism, in loneliness and overwork; all the forces that keep our lives constricted and unfulfilled. "Radical Acceptance" offers a path to freedom, including the day-to-day practical guidance developed over Dr. Brach's twenty years of work with therapy clients and Buddhist students.Writing with great warmth and clarity, Tara Brach brings her teachings alive through personal stories and case histories, fresh interpretations of Buddhist tales, and guided meditations. Step by step, she leads us to trust our innate goodness, showing how we can develop the balance of clear-sightedness and compassion that is the essence of "Radical Acceptance". "Radical Acceptance" does not mean self-indulgence or passivity. Instead it empowers genuine change: healing fear and shame and helping to build loving, authentic relationships. When we stop being at war with ourselves, we are free to live fully every precious moment of our lives.… (more)
Member:erdomii
Title:Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
Authors:Tara Brach (Author)
Info:Bantam (2004), Edition: Reprint, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha by Tara Brach

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 14 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
The beginning had this Welcome to the Subculture vibe that I didn’t like; I’ve read books like this before, and sometimes the worst thing is Interesting Ideas, sadly. But (if I perceive correctly) it sorta wears off as you go on, and the last third or so was better overall. And of course acceptance is a powerful technique. It can’t guarantee joy on earth because nothing can, but it can drain you of negative emotion, largely if not perfectly.

I obviously can’t summarize all the ideas, but briefly: you don’t have to accept the goodness of external events (my example: bodies into the oven instead of pizza), but you can accept the bodily sensations that events create in you: I am angry; it’s ok that I feel angry. I am afraid; it’s ok that I feel afraid. Body scan meditations are also very good: feeling, even enjoying slightly, neutral bodily sensations instead of turning away and/or being displeased, or grasping.

As the book gradually finishes developing its purely personal themes and drifts towards a conclusion, or the latter bit at least, it starts to really develop the issue of accepting people who are Outside the Subculture, which was only hinted at before. I mean, although she clearly does have a half-acknowledged problem with authority, it could be worse—at least if you take everything she says at face value.... It is still largely liberal and middle-class, having trouble with authority and dealing with people’s acute suffering mostly through the lens of therapy, (think about it: it has to be approved by insurance), although that’s still more than some Interesting Ideas people do to engage with people’s problems. I’ll deal a bit with the first issue—authority is bad—mostly because liberal-conservative is what I can understand and wrap my mind around. I don’t have much money, but I come from a middle-class background. I don’t know what it’s like to grow up in a bad neighborhood.

So, yes, there is a dark side to new age acceptance, like there’s a dark side to everything. (I know ‘new age’ can be used as a term of abuse, but it’s the most useful term I know for this movement, and even the most free-spirited individuals belong to movements.) That is, Tara Brach is tempted to not really be accepting of conventional people, and especially authority, and this is typical of the new age.... I don’t really think of her as a Buddhist; she’s more Buddhist-based, or something like that, but maybe mostly rebel therapist. She certainly doesn’t seem to get much out of being part of an organization, including any Buddhist one, which has the problem that you eventually don’t accept anyone else’s opinion to guide or check you. Even intellectuals need somebody else higher up to check them, including the tradition of the dead, and orthodox Buddhists would accept this. (Dead can dance, right.) On the one hand, I’m not conventional myself, and I don’t recommend it, but the The Myths of the Masses Are Destroying Us attitude she opens the book with isn’t something I recognize as being terribly wholesome either.

Part therapist, part rebel: at times the occasionally almost standard post-Freudian analysis of childhood past comes up, but then immediately some exotic Tibetan name will pop up too, perhaps more to prove something than to provide information.

Now, I know what it’s like to be told to go back to the servants’ quarters, (I suppose many people do if they’re honest), and of course I don’t like it. Naturally I know that not all hierarchical relationships are healthy and that sometimes you have to choose who you want as your teacher, your master. But sometimes, always and only—radically, if you will—to say, ‘I accept myself’ in a certain way or with a certain intention, is just to reject all authority, which is the opposite of acceptance of course. (I wouldn’t pretend to be the Thomas Merton Expert in the room, but I think that he accepted the authority that was above himself as a means to accept the other authorities that were above other people, which is not really typical new age any more than it’s fundamentalist.)

That’s the dark side of new age acceptance. Without any authority it’s hard to exist in either the religious or the scientific world, and the spiritual therapist rebel can really only exist on the margins of both. I suppose that’s one way to live, but to hear some people talk, it’s the only way to live—perhaps it’s the way we all already *do* live!.... They like to talk about the shadow of tribalism; this is their shadow; it can only be popular, not formal. Or rather, semi-popular, since ‘the myths of the masses are destroying us’.

But anyway, the drawback to thinking you’re a good writer is that you write rather too much, obviously, and clearly what I’m writing here could easily be turned into a garbled Donald Trump Junior tweet, right.

A little flourish to conclude: I’m reminded of a line from one of the Narnia novels—in a certain attractive place there were no bugs, only trees. Of course, there’s a certain appeal to this: bugs attack us, and take things that we want, since we both want many of the same things (fruits, vegetables). But I do think that the best mysterious place would indeed be one where we could accept the tiny multitudinous forms of insect life; a place where that would be easy, or at least, fully realizable, would be a mysterious place worth going to.

Anyway, techniques are less tribal than teachers, but nothing’s perfect. Life requires both acceptance and prosperity, in all but the most extreme and death-like situations. (“Not that death is an evil, for if it were, it would have seemed so to Socrates.” “But Aristotle agrees with what I just said, if I remember correctly.”) But Tara Brach, although certainly not the most fundamentalist acceptance teacher I know—that would be Eckhart Tolle—does work more or less exclusively with acceptance, it seems. There’s no community, prosperity, teachers (not books), or much working and living—just you and your acceptance. (At least in the bulk of the book. I suppose it also bears saying that she doesn’t pretend that having a practice means that you’ll never be tested.)

It can be nice to have a teacher who unifies both ends for you, not just a technician to show you one end: on the other hand, techniques really are complicated, and they can work.... Better a good technician than a false teacher.
  goosecap | Sep 28, 2020 |
I love the idea behind the twin wings of radical acceptance -- recognition of the way things are and great compassion for oneself and others as we deal with it. But I struggle a bit with bringing the advice, ideas and lengthy meditation prompts to life in my life. ( )
  Wattsian | Mar 12, 2020 |
“Believing that something is wrong with us is a deep and tenacious suffering,” says Tara Brach at the start of this illuminating book. This suffering emerges in crippling self-judgments and conflicts in our relationships, in addictions and perfectionism, in loneliness and overwork--all the forces that keep our lives constricted and unfulfilled. Radical Acceptance offers a path to freedom, including the day-to-day practical guidance developed over Dr. Brach’s twenty years of work with therapy clients and Buddhist students.

Writing with great warmth and clarity, Tara Brach brings her teachings alive through personal stories and case histories, fresh interpretations of Buddhist tales, and guided meditations. Step by step, she leads us to trust our innate goodness, showing how we can develop the balance of clear-sightedness and compassion that is the essence of Radical Acceptance. Radical Acceptance does not mean self-indulgence or passivity. Instead it empowers genuine change: healing fear and shame and helping to build loving, authentic relationships. When we stop being at war with ourselves, we are free to live fully every precious moment of our lives.
  PSZC | Jan 2, 2020 |
Maybe it's Buddhism lite, but I found that this book really encouraged me to meditate. OK, so it's mostly when I'm riding the T - but the idea is using meditation to examine emotion in a way I didn't know about, to loosen the grip of tortuous thoughts and feelings. I even found myself checking out meditation retreats, but I won't be rushing into that stuff right away... Instead I ended up buying the audio version which is somewhat different than the print version, but so far, so good. Her voice is very soothing. Of course I've racked up a list of other books on Buddhism to add to the big to read list. (March 04, 2006) ( )
  cindywho | May 27, 2019 |
Tara's take on radical acceptance and the difference it can make in your life is worth trying. Having finished the book, I am beginning to apply some of the principles. I know I will need to read this book again. ( )
  Velmeran | Jan 26, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

"Believing that something is wrong with us is a deep and tenacious suffering," says Tara Brach at the start of this illuminating book. This suffering emerges in crippling self-judgments and conflicts in our relationships, in addictions and perfectionism, in loneliness and overwork; all the forces that keep our lives constricted and unfulfilled. "Radical Acceptance" offers a path to freedom, including the day-to-day practical guidance developed over Dr. Brach's twenty years of work with therapy clients and Buddhist students.Writing with great warmth and clarity, Tara Brach brings her teachings alive through personal stories and case histories, fresh interpretations of Buddhist tales, and guided meditations. Step by step, she leads us to trust our innate goodness, showing how we can develop the balance of clear-sightedness and compassion that is the essence of "Radical Acceptance". "Radical Acceptance" does not mean self-indulgence or passivity. Instead it empowers genuine change: healing fear and shame and helping to build loving, authentic relationships. When we stop being at war with ourselves, we are free to live fully every precious moment of our lives.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.08)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 3
2.5 2
3 21
3.5 2
4 39
4.5 6
5 44

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,612,087 books! | Top bar: Always visible