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Nobody Loves a Centurion (SPQR VI) (Ebook)…
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Nobody Loves a Centurion (SPQR VI) (Ebook) (edition 2003)

by John Maddox Roberts

Series: SPQR (6)

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196490,148 (3.94)3
Member:dmaness
Title:Nobody Loves a Centurion (SPQR VI) (Ebook)
Authors:John Maddox Roberts
Info:St. Martin's Griffin (2003), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Fiction

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Nobody Loves a Centurion by John Maddox Roberts

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» See also 3 mentions

English (3)  German (1)  All languages (4)
Showing 3 of 3
"Men do not achieve the centurionate by being mild. Nobody loves a centurion. But they're seldom murdered." So says Caesar to Decius Metellus the Younger, who is putting in his mandatory year of military service in Gaul with Caesar. A brutal centurion has been murdered; Burrus, one of Decius's clients, and prime suspect, along with the other members of his contubernium, has been accused of the murder. Unless the murderer can be found in ten days, the squad will be executed. So Decius and his slave Hermes hop to their investigation. Their nosiness leads them to a German encampment, where damning evidence leads Decimus to a culprit. But, afterwards, back at the camp, trying to piece together anamolies in the chain of events, he has second thoughts....

Pacing was good and Decius was a likeable character. Nice to know that Decimus acted as Caesar's secretary and in proofing Caesar's notes, had to figure out Caesar's atrocious handwriting and correct his miserable spelling. I'd say the grammar was fine; nothing was said about it one way or the other and Caesar's still being read today. :) I figured out the significance of the death early on but I didn't guess the real culprit. This was a quick, fun read. ( )
  janerawoof | Mar 10, 2016 |
In this sixth installment of the SPQR series, Decius is once again out of Rome, this time joining Julius Caesar in Gaul. Decius does not cut an impressive military figure, but Caesar knows of his skill as an investigator, and orders him to find out who killed a particularly detestable centurion. This lacks some of the bite of the previous novels, or perhaps it's just that Decius is away from his beloved Rome. ( )
  annbury | Sep 17, 2010 |
Plot: For the series, the detective story is dominant and side plots are not as developed as in other installments. The historical background is of the better known ones, which means that those events also hover in the background.

Characters: Most of the usual side characters are missing, which is a pity because they are what makes the stories so much fun. Decius on his own is entertaining, but a certain something is lacking. Characterisation is well done, as usual.

Style: Highly entertaining to read, with plenty of snarky comments and observations. The style is very casual but never trips over modern words.

Plus: The army interactions, the take on the Gallic War.

Minus: Almost all Roman side characters are missing.

Summary: Not the best in the series, but still good. ( )
  surreality | Apr 5, 2008 |
Showing 3 of 3
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Maddox Robertsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dingman, Alan D.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pendleton, RoyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stein, MarkMapssecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For The Albuquerque Page One, Too 1st Friday Author's Group: Shop-talkers par excellence
First words
I blame it all on Alexander the Great.
Quotations
There are two ways to acquire great muscles: one is through years of strenuous athletic exercise.  The other is to buy them from an armorer.  I had chosen the latter course. (p.4)
[Gauls] fancy the head to be the repository of many virtues such as courage and wisdom.  We Romans hold that these qualities reside in the liver.  Personally, I am neutral, but I would regret losing either of them. (p.40)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
"These things happened in Gaul, in the year 696 of the City of Rome, the consulship of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus and Aulus Gabinius."  (58 BC).
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312320191, Paperback)

Like so many young men in later generations, Roman playboy/detective Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger is faced with the necessity of serving in his country's armed forces. Since a dangerous enemy has become powerful in the politics of Rome, Decius is just as well out of the city for a while. He sets out to join Caesar in Gaul (where the general has come and seen, but has as yet not been able to conquer. The occupying Roman army is at a standstill. When Decius shows up in full parade regalia (much to the amusement of the more informally uniformed veterans) and accompanied only by his young personal slave. Caesar sets him the task of discovering who murdered one of his centurions, a cruel and unfair officer feared and hated by every man of the one hundred soldiers under him. A further prod to Decius is that the main suspect is a youth whose father is a close friend of the Metellus family. With Caesar's decree that another killer be found in a matter of hours or the young man dies, Decius has his work cut out for him.

John Maddox Roberts's series set in the first century A.D. vividly brings to readers a strong sense of the everyday life of the ancient Romans in the context of our own.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:37 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The murder of a powerful centurion finds playboy sleuth Decius Caecillius Metellus rendering his services unto Caesar by investigating the dastardly crime, in a mystery set in ancient Rome.

(summary from another edition)

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