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Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas by Mark…
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Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas (original 2018; edition 2018)

by Mark Kurlansky (Author)

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2077103,868 (3.5)13
Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestsellingCod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization. Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.… (more)
Member:KarenRennich
Title:Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Authors:Mark Kurlansky (Author)
Info:Bloomsbury Publishing (2018), Edition: First Edition, 400 pages
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Milk! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas by Mark Kurlansky (2018)

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» See also 13 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I enjoyed this fun and easy-to-read book about my favourite beverage, even as I haven't drunk very much in the years that I've known my wife. A simple food, milk has an interesting and contentious history. I look forward to reading more by Mark Kurlansky. ( )
  Jimbookbuff1963 | Jun 5, 2021 |
Fact after fact, oftentimes feeling randomly assorted and repetitive. Also, I found it strange how much space he devoted to human breastfeeding. I mean, yeah, I know it's milk, but it felt very incongruous in what was otherwise a food book. I mean, yeah, I know it's food, but... I just didn't like it, OK?

What I did like was the author's dry sense of humor and low profile. ( )
  Tytania | May 12, 2021 |
What a disappointment - and from one of my favorite authors! This book was WAY TOO LONG and had WAY TOO MANY RECIPES. AND WAY TOO REDUNDANT. It seemed like was written by a different person. I must admit I was amazed. I found myself skipping around until finally found an interesting section to read. I had to force myself too finish. Did he fire all his editors? And what's with the childish illustrations. Good grief! ( )
  repb | Jun 19, 2019 |
If there is anything, you want to know about milk the answer is most likely in this book. If like me you haven't given much thought to milk other than pouring it in your coffee or over you breakfast cereal you might be surprised to find that Kurlansky has looked into the history of milk from antiquity until today and the role it plays in our modern lives. Whether he is examining old recipes in which milk was first used, exploring accounts of making milk safe for the masses, discussing the process of pasteurization and the spread of milk or just thinking about the welfare of milk herds in the industrialized world there is a wealth of information contained within this book. Not surprisingly, I learned a lot from Kurlansky's thoughtful approach, and I can honestly say that this cultural history of milk is unlike anything else I've read lately.

Thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.
More reviews at: www.susannesbooklist.blogspot.com ( )
  SUS456 | Jun 29, 2018 |
Felt about this one nearly the same as I did Salt when I read that more than a decade ago. Very interesting, but too rambling and repetitive. The inclusion of the recipes tended more to disturb the narrative flow of he book for me than add anything to the mix. ( )
  JBD1 | Jun 22, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestsellingCod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization. Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.

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