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The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to…
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The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the… (original 2018; edition 2018)

by Benjamin Carter Hett (Author)

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633269,946 (3.8)4
Member:Chalkstone
Title:The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic
Authors:Benjamin Carter Hett (Author)
Info:Henry Holt and Co. (2018), 304 pages
Collections:Atheneum
Rating:****
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The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic by Benjamin Carter Hett (2018)

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You’ll always be able to tell when a book about Hitler was written post-Trump, I think. This one’s intro and conclusion emphasize Weimar citizens’ indifference to truth and Hitler’s lack of deep intelligence as opposed to pseudointellectualism; he was such a liar that he never even knew what the truth was. The rest of the book is a political history of the particular maneuvers that Hitler used to come to power in a regime where the Nazis lacked majority or even near-majority support until after they were firmly in charge. As we probably all know by now, it was the decision of non-fascist right-wingers that the Nazis provided needed energy and support to their movement, and their confidence that they could control Hitler, that made the difference. One described Hitler as chancellor not as the “head” of the nation, but as the “hat” to be put on and off as needed. Good metaphor, bad prediction. ( )
  rivkat | Sep 14, 2018 |
5577. The Death of Democracy Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic, by Benjamin Carter Hett (read 26 Aug 2018) This is a 2018 book which relates the doleful story of the ascent of Hitler to be Chancellor in Germany. It is oly 262 pages and one is truck anew by how easy it seemed to be,once Hitler was elevated to be Chancellor by Hindenburg, for him and his cohorts to crush his opponents. One gets the idea that the German Constitution, with its provision for rule by decree "if necessary",was fatally flawed The book tells me that one must be alert to oppose those who seek to demonize and mock their opponents. Hitler was not hampered by a First Amendment guaranteeing a free press and once he attained power he ruthlessly eliminated his opponents An account which shows the need for vigilance against would be dictators. ( )
  Schmerguls | Aug 26, 2018 |
This is the best book I have read discussing the rise of Nazism in Germany. Particularly appreciated are the explanations of the Weimar constitution. The book is highly recommended for its parallels to today's political situation. ( )
  M_Clark | Jul 10, 2018 |
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Book description
A riveting account of how the Nazi Party came to power and how the failures of the Weimar Republic and the shortsightedness of German politicians allowed it to happen.

Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time.

To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany's leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler's hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship.

Benjamin Carter Hett is a leading scholar of twentieth-century Germany and a gifted storyteller whose portraits of these feckless politicians show how fragile democracy can be when those in power do not respect it. He offers a powerful lesson for today, when democracy once again finds itself embattled and the siren song of strongmen sounds ever louder. [Amazon.co.uk]
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"A riveting account of how the Nazi Party came to power and how the failures of the Weimar Republic and the shortsightedness of German politicians allowed it to happen. Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s. How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In [this book], Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time. To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany's leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler's hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship. Benjamin Carter Hett is a leading scholar of twentieth-century Germany and a gifted storyteller whose portraits of these feckless politicians show how fragile democracy can be when those in power do not respect it. He offers a powerful lesson for today, when democracy once again finds itself embattled and the siren song of strongmen sounds ever louder."--Dust jacket.… (more)

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