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On The Come Up by Angie Thomas
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On The Come Up (edition 2019)

by Angie Thomas (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2766611,270 (4.27)55
This is the highly anticipated second novel by Angie Thomas, the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling, award-winning The Hate U Give. Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri's got massive shoes to fill. But it's hard to get your come up when you're labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral...for all the wrong reasons. Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn't just want to make it--she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.   Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn't always free.… (more)
Member:alicia.becker
Title:On The Come Up
Authors:Angie Thomas (Author)
Info:Balzer Bray (2019), Edition: First Edition, 464 pages
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On The Come Up by Angie Thomas

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Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Excellent! Brianna, daughter of a murdered rapper, wants to be a rapper too. She has the skills, talent, and the words. However, she has some challenges. Can she handle the challenges and still pursue her dream? ( )
  AdwoaCamaraIfe | Aug 1, 2021 |
After loving THUG so very much, even thinking it’s one of the best and most important YA novels in the last decades (what am I saying… most important novels in general, not just YA) out there, I had of course high hopes for this one. Very well knowing that whatever comes after such a masterpiece debut novel maybe shouldn’t be compared/judged too harshly. You don’t write two equally brilliant masterpieces one after another. Or do you? My opinion on On The Come Up is, that it was again a very well written book! The story touches once again many issues: race, police brutality, bullying, abuse of power, teenage angst and also introduces us to the rap music scene. I still can give the book “only” 4 Stars and it’s probably a bit unfair, given what I said earlier, to directly compare it to THUG, but I can’t help it. This book misses that brilliance mark only by an inch, but it misses it. For one, because I couldn’t help but find Brie not always a very likable character. I’ve got to say though, that I’m a white woman past her 50s and I might not “get” certain things that would give me a better understanding of Brie’s actions. I wouldn’t rule that out. Also, it’s not that characters in books have to be likeable all the time. They don’t! With Brie though… I could more identify with her mother and her mother’s actions and how she reacted to what her daughter did and said. Not sure if that makes sense now. I’m probably just too old to not shake my head about the girl at times. Which doesn’t mean she was only unlikable. She wasn’t! And often I totally saw her point and understood her pain and fears. But then, I also quite often didn’t. In addition I sometimes found the pacing a bit slow. Altogether it was again a great book though and I’m “complaining” on a high level. Even though I’m not at all a fan of rap music and have close to zero knowledge about it, I found it very interesting to learn more about it here. I highly recommend that book. To those who loved THUG for sure. And also to those who are not a fan of rap.
  Heidi64 | Jul 18, 2021 |
Nowhere near as good as Thomas's inaugural effort, The Hate U Give, a/k/a THUG, which was a timely book about profiling, police brutality, and racial strife, Starring a wonderful heroine. In her sophomore effort, her protagonist (Brianne Jackson), a/k/a Bri, is a 16-year old brat. She comes from the better side of a poor area, lucky enough to attend a school in a better neighborhood: her mother is a recovering drug addict, her father was a rapper killed in a drive-by, and her bright brother has come home with his college degree to find he has to work in a pizzeria. Bri's dream is to be a rapper like her father, and she has the talent. But she makes dreadful choices, and treats most everyone horribly, and when she has the chance to do the right thing at her school, she walks away to follow her dream. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
diverse teen fiction (social justice in schools=black/brown kids being targeted/disproportionately punished, media bias, incidentally gay supporting characters)
Bri's dad was killed as a bystander in a gang war; her mother is a recovering (8 years clean) drug addict; her aunt is a drug-dealing member of the Garden Disciples. Her older brother has taken a minimum wage job at a pizza place to help pay bills, but her family always seems to be on the verge of going hungry, being evicted, or having the gas or electricity shut off.
This wasn't as riveting as The Hate U Give, and I struggled a bit with the rap lyrics while I was reading (since I personally don't have any talent for finding the rhythms), but I think this will resonate a LOT with modern kids of color. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Wow. I just finished and Angie Thomas once again has me all up in my feelings. I could feel the anger, the fear, the desperation and the love pouring off the pages in waves, sometimes all at once. These are the kinds of stories that have all of their foundation in real world issues that are far away from a life I know. And that's why I read them. Not only do I think Thomas is a genius but I think the education she provides privileged readers like myself is so incredibly valuable. Representation matters so much and the more books like this I read, the more I realize how true that statement is. I didn't get it before. But because of stories like this one, I get it now.

I think this book has just as important of a message as her previous one did and I'm willing to bet the next one will too. Bravo Angie Thomas. Bravo. ( )
  Stacie-C | May 8, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Coker, AnjolaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hidouk, AnissaPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marrs, TimCover Designsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turpin, BahniNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For the kids with the SoundCloud accounts and the big dreams. I see you. And for my mom, who saw it in me first.
First words
I might have to kill somebody tonight.
Quotations
"Who are you?" she [Jay/Mom] repeats. "Of the millions and billions of people in the world, you're the only person who can answer that. Not people online or at your school. I can't even answer that. I can say who I think you are." She cups my cheek. "And I think you're brilliant, talented, courageous, beautiful. You're my miracle. But you're the only one who can say who you are with authority. So, who are you?" (p. 397)
You see, I'm headstrong (and petty) like Grandma. I'm creative like Granddaddy. I speak my mind like Mom. I might be as strong as her, too. I care so much that it hurts. Like Trey. I'm like my dad in a lot of ways, even if I'm not him. And although Kayla isn't family (yet), maybe she's a glimpse at who I could be. If I'm nothing else, I'm them, and they're me. That more than enough. (p. 425)
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This collector's edition contains a letter from the author, deleted scenes, a picture of the author as a teen rapper, an annotated playlist, Angie's top 5 MCs, an annotated rap, illustrated quotes from the book, and an excerpt from Angie's next novel.
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This is the highly anticipated second novel by Angie Thomas, the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling, award-winning The Hate U Give. Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri's got massive shoes to fill. But it's hard to get your come up when you're labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral...for all the wrong reasons. Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn't just want to make it--she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.   Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn't always free.

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