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Queen of Angels by Greg Bear
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Queen of Angels (edition 1990)

by Greg Bear

Series: Queen Of Angels (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2681511,225 (3.45)18
Hugo Award Finalist: A near-future novel of artificial intelligence, human nature, and mass murder that "succeeds on virtually every level" (The New York Times Book Review).   In Los Angeles in 2047, advances in the science of psychology have made crime a rare occurrence. So it's utterly shocking when eight bodies are detected in an apartment, and not long afterward the perpetrator is revealed as well: noted poet Emmanuel Goldsmith. The LAPD's Mary Choy--who has had both her appearance and her police work enhanced by nanotechnology--is tasked with arresting the killer, while psychotherapy pioneer Martin Burke prepares to explore his mind. Meanwhile, Goldsmith's good friend and fellow writer reels at the news--while, far from all of them, a space probe makes a startling discovery.   This "excellent" novel about technology, identity, and the nature of consciousness is a thought-provoking stunner by the Nebula Award-winning author of the Eon series and the Forerunner Saga (Chicago Tribune).    … (more)
Member:ncw
Title:Queen of Angels
Authors:Greg Bear
Info:New York: Warner Books, 1994, Mass Market Paperback, 422 pages.
Collections:Your library
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Queen of Angels by Greg Bear

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» See also 18 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
A decent exploration of consciousness/awareness/self-analysis(the benefit of). Major themes: a man kills people and doesn't know why; an interstellar probe is not self-aware, but can't deal with NOT finding interstellar life; the exploration of the "country of the mind" goes wrong; an acolyte contemplates murder just to prove that he's not an emotional cypher. All of these sub-plots connect through their questioning what is conscious reality and what is sanity. There is a competent description of the various levels of the mind and how we differ from "lower" animals....and why we sometimes perform at best, hurtful acts; at worst, despicable acts. The concept of "hellcrowns" is definitely painful, but acceptable in terms of the analysis of the concept/meaning/value of punishment. Bear seems to have missed the idea that we created the concept of a "punitive god", theoretically, to control the would-be slackers who try to hide in the multitudes: "you can't hide from GOD!" ( )
  majackson | Jun 5, 2021 |
Misschien een top-boek, waarom zou het anders genomineerd zijn voor een aantal prijzen, maar ik kon er niet doorheen komen.

Probeer het later nog wel eens. Of niet.
  EdwinKort | Oct 18, 2019 |
It's cool and interesting and there's a lot going on to recommend it, but it didn't come together for me. ( )
  Jon_Hansen | Sep 12, 2019 |
I really wanted something other than your, thow-away space opera, but didn't find it here. Such a shame, in my opinion, because the stories (there are at least three going on at the same time) all had such potential, but it didn't feel like they were fully developed. The writing was also necessarily complex. and convoluted, which made reading it a chore. Considering I read it on a plane and was essentially a captive audience, and still couldn't get into the story speaks volumes. I couldn't even remember the title of the book and had to search for it online to post this review. ( )
1 vote snotbottom | Sep 19, 2018 |
Nope. Can't do it. Sort of feels like it was written in another language, poorly translated into English, and then printed as is. I don't enjoy reading books that give me a headache.
I loved Eon, Eternity, and a few of his others, but this series isn't happening for me (I also accidentally read Slant before this not knowing it was the 4th in this set). ( )
  shorte | Feb 26, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Greg Bearprimary authorall editionscalculated
Eggleton, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jones, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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This one is for Alexandra from before she was born, until long past 100000000000
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Orca shiny in water, touched by mercury ripples, Mary Choy sank into her vinegar bath, first lone moment in seventy two hours.
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Hugo Award Finalist: A near-future novel of artificial intelligence, human nature, and mass murder that "succeeds on virtually every level" (The New York Times Book Review).   In Los Angeles in 2047, advances in the science of psychology have made crime a rare occurrence. So it's utterly shocking when eight bodies are detected in an apartment, and not long afterward the perpetrator is revealed as well: noted poet Emmanuel Goldsmith. The LAPD's Mary Choy--who has had both her appearance and her police work enhanced by nanotechnology--is tasked with arresting the killer, while psychotherapy pioneer Martin Burke prepares to explore his mind. Meanwhile, Goldsmith's good friend and fellow writer reels at the news--while, far from all of them, a space probe makes a startling discovery.   This "excellent" novel about technology, identity, and the nature of consciousness is a thought-provoking stunner by the Nebula Award-winning author of the Eon series and the Forerunner Saga (Chicago Tribune).    

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