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Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes

by Hena Khan

Other authors: Mehrdokht Amini (Illustrator)

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1054217,960 (4.15)None
From a crescent moon to a square garden to an octagonal fountain, this breathtaking picture book celebrates the shapes - and traditions - of the Muslim world. Sure to inspire questions and observations about world religions and cultures, Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets is equally at home in a classroom reading circle and on a parent's lap being read to a child.… (more)
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I loved this book! This early concept book was a lovely read! It introduces Muslim faith/culture using simple shapes with Islamic terminology. It's vividly illustrated, and includes a glossary and author's note on shapes in Islamic art add a sweet touch to this stunning picture book. ( )
  jstruzzi | Jan 14, 2022 |
I loved this book! This early concept book was a lovely read! It introduces Muslim faith/culture using simple shapes with Islamic terminology. It's vividly illustrated, and includes a glossary and author's note on shapes in Islamic art add a sweet touch to this stunning picture book. ( )
  jstruzzi | Jan 14, 2022 |
Pakistani-American author Hena Khan and expatriate Iranian illustrator Mehrdokht Amini, who previously collaborated on Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors, team up once again in this lovely picture-book examination of shapes and Muslim customs. The rhyming text describes the shapes of various objects and places central to the practice of Islam - the rectangle of the mosque's door, the hexagon of a tile painted with an ayah (a verse of the Quran) - while the artwork depicts Muslims from a wide variety of countries and backgrounds...

Like its predecessor, I found Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes to be an immensely appealing book, one which pairs a readable, engaging text with gorgeous artwork. The visual feast begins on the decorative endpapers, and continues throughout, as Amini uses deep colors, beautiful shapes and designs, and elegantly stylized figures to create one lovely scene after another. A glossary at the rear explains some of the words used in the main narrative - iftar, daff, mihrab, etc. - while the author's note gives more information. My only note of caution would be with regard to the author's blanket statement about the depiction of humans and animals in Islamic tradition, and how this is discouraged, because of strict interpretations of the prohibition on idol worship. While this is certainly true today, in many Islamic countries and cultures, and has also been true in some countries and cultures of the past, leading to the use of geometric forms in many Islamic arts, it is not now, nor has it ever been universally true, and there is considerable disagreement on the subject, amongst scholars. One need only think of works such as the Persian Shahnameh, which has been illustrated with both animal and human figures throughout the centuries, to see that this is true. While this generalization on Khan's part in no ways detracts from the virtues of the book, it is worth noting, so that young people don't take away the wrong impression from the author's note. Leaving that one quibble aside, this is one I would recommend to picture-book readers seeking titles with Muslim content, or featuring shapes. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Apr 23, 2021 |
I still like the concept and style of this book by Hena Khan and Mehrdokht Amini, but I do like their other book together better 'Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns'. This one feels a little more forced and complicated (cubes and Arches aren't basic shapes). I still love the overall premise though, and showing that Muslims live in different countries around the world. ( )
  EMiMIB | Aug 7, 2019 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hena Khanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Amini, MehrdokhtIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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From a crescent moon to a square garden to an octagonal fountain, this breathtaking picture book celebrates the shapes - and traditions - of the Muslim world. Sure to inspire questions and observations about world religions and cultures, Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets is equally at home in a classroom reading circle and on a parent's lap being read to a child.

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