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Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic:…
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Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic: Tuskegee, Colonialism, and the… (edition 2017)

by Andrew E. Barnes (Author)

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In Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic, Andrew E. Barnes chronicles African Christians' turn to American-style industrial education--particularly the model that had been developed by Booker T. Washington at Alabama's Tuskegee Institute--as a vehicle for Christian regeneration in Africa. Over the period 1880-1920, African Christians, motivated by Ethiopianism and its conviction that Africans should be saved by other Africans, proposed and founded schools based upon the Tuskegee model. Barnes follows the tides of the Black Atlantic back to Africa when African Christians embraced the new education initiatives of African American Christians and Tuskegee as the most potent example of technological ingenuity. Building on previously unused African sources, the book traces the movements to establish industrial education institutes in cities along the West African coast and in South Africa, Cape Province, and Natal. As Tuskegee and African schools modeled in its image proved, peoples of African descent could--and did--develop competitive technology. Though the attempts by African Christians to create industrial education schools ultimately failed, Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic demonstrates the ultimate success of transatlantic black identity and Christian resurgence in Africa at the turn of the twentieth century. Barnes' study documents how African Christians sought to maintain indigenous identity and agency in the face of colonial domination by the state and even the European Christian missions of the church. --… (more)
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Title:Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic: Tuskegee, Colonialism, and the Shaping of African Industrial Education (Studies in World Christianity)
Authors:Andrew E. Barnes (Author)
Info:Baylor University Press (2017), 219 pages
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Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic : Tuskegee, colonialism, and the shaping of African industrial education by Andrew E. Barnes

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In Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic, Andrew E. Barnes chronicles African Christians' turn to American-style industrial education--particularly the model that had been developed by Booker T. Washington at Alabama's Tuskegee Institute--as a vehicle for Christian regeneration in Africa. Over the period 1880-1920, African Christians, motivated by Ethiopianism and its conviction that Africans should be saved by other Africans, proposed and founded schools based upon the Tuskegee model. Barnes follows the tides of the Black Atlantic back to Africa when African Christians embraced the new education initiatives of African American Christians and Tuskegee as the most potent example of technological ingenuity. Building on previously unused African sources, the book traces the movements to establish industrial education institutes in cities along the West African coast and in South Africa, Cape Province, and Natal. As Tuskegee and African schools modeled in its image proved, peoples of African descent could--and did--develop competitive technology. Though the attempts by African Christians to create industrial education schools ultimately failed, Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic demonstrates the ultimate success of transatlantic black identity and Christian resurgence in Africa at the turn of the twentieth century. Barnes' study documents how African Christians sought to maintain indigenous identity and agency in the face of colonial domination by the state and even the European Christian missions of the church. --

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