HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Four Day Win: End Your Diet War and Achieve Thinner Peace

by Martha Beck

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1391153,292 (4.09)4
The woman Psychology Today calls "the best-known life coach in America" shatters the myth that willpower is an effective weight-loss tool and introduces a revolutionary approach to lifetime leanness based on a series of "4-Day Wins" that work with any weight-loss program Substitute a good habit for a bad one and stick to it for just 4 days, and it begins to feel normal. That's the surprising discovery that holds the key to lifetime weight control, according to life coach and New York Times best-selling author Martha Beck. Not a conventional diet or exercise program, The Four-Day Win combines evolutionary logic, psychology, and neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to restructure itself, which suggests ways to reshape our bodies) with strategies and success stories--plus large doses of humor and an insightful, straightforward approach to teach the principles required to reverse weight issues. Drawn from hundreds of hours interviewing weight losers--in both her discussions with private clients and her groundbreaking consulting work for Jenny Craig--Dr. Beck reveals: Why willpower-based dieting is doomed to fail How to step out of the conflict between the rule-making Commander (who bans all our favorite foods) and the rule-breaking Resistor (who gives in to cravings) and reach the Watcher, who is our happiest self What the latest research into the mind-body connection reveals about how our emotions affect our eating Breaking down the weight-loss marathon into 4-day intervals, Dr. Beck provides effective strategies for changing the behaviors that make us fat. And if there is a relapse, readers take comfort in knowing they are just 4 days from turning it around.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

It's such a pity that this ground breaking AWESOME information is hidden between the wisecracks, nasty puns and disorder of this wonderful book.

But still YOU HAVE TO READ THIS BOOK!!!

Beck synthesizes; 'Changing for Good', 'Intuitive Eating' and 'The Places that Scare You' into the most amazing diet advice book evah! And I'll give you hint - it's not what you eat. She uses some wacky, dumbed down exercises to get your psyche working on your side. Which because I love her so much, and I don't really mind lame navel gazing I am going to do. Watch this space. Let's see if I can effortlessly maintain happily ever after.

In my senior year in high school I took a college study course that taught among other things like speed reading taught us ten barriers to learning. Some of those were; not liking the instructor or having the material poorly presented. The material is 4DW is sadly poorly presented but the underlying information was a revelation, to me.

Okay now that I’ve had a day to review this and let things settle. Let’s see if revisiting the ‘bent down corners’ of this book can help me make sense of it.

“I believe the West is in the midst of an obesity epidemic not only because we’re oversupplied with fattening food, but because we’re telling ourselves we must not eat it.”

“I found that writing with my non-dominant hand was exceptionally useful for determining what my subconscious mind was thinking about food and eating.”

Have you even done well on a diet, even a moderate one for a considerable amount of time and then all of the sudden your find the urge to overeat a food that you literally haven’t had in years? Maybe this is what happened;

“In situations where our brains perceive extreme threat, the neo-cortex … may be “hijacked” by the deeper, more primitive reptilian layer.”


Beck doesn’t use Id and SuperEgo but I found her ‘Wildchild’ and ‘Dictator’ names stupid. I immediately visualized my Id as Lucy Lawless/Xena and my SuperEgo as Heather Graham dressed as a porn dominatrix in The Guru. I admit I have enjoyed watching the two of them duke it out in my head ever since the images appeared.

“When we’re locked in the war between our Id and SuperEgo, our prevailing mental state is anxiety. This causes floods of stress hormones … In biological terms, the opposite of getting fat is getting connected, and the antidote to being out of control isn’t being in control, but being in love ...”


It has always irks me when someone states unequivocally that they weight X# of pounds. Our cells are constantly turning over, we’re consuming and eliminating, nothing is static about the body.

“Learning never ends, and no condition is permanent. But life without change or challenge would be like life in a rubber room. The way to cope with life’s constant change and uncertain progress is to relish fresh experiences, not avoid them.”


This was the sticking point for me in the book Intuitive Eating. I never, ever could trust this. But since Beck has revealed my multiple personality and that I only really need to listen to one of them. Well that changes everything.

“Ultimately, you’ll be able to…with a high level of confidence that your real nature will choose to eat exactly what is right for you.”

My son has a bowl of candy that I keep full for him. It stays full. Miraculously he eats when he’s hungry and stops when he’s full. It’s a miracle!

“Removing fattening food from your house to make yourself eat less is about as effective as Prohibition was in making Americans drink less.”

“No matter what diet you’ve chosen, don’t adhere to it so strictly that you feel absolutely famished,. Ever.”

“Famine conditions cause the brain-body connection to haul out some very big neuro-chemical guns. The hungrier we get, the more a hormone called dopamine floods an area of our brains called the nucleus accumbens. This causes goal-seeking activity, including the search for food. If we eat immediately, the nucleus accumbens gets swamped with serotonin, we feel satisfied and we stop thinking about eating. If no food shows up, dopamine levels keep rising, driving increasingly urgent food-seeking. Over time, this creates structural changes in the brain so that cravings come to dominate our thoughts and behavior – even if we get food.”

It gets even worse if you know anything about Leptin, NPY and grehlin.

“In many Asian philosophical traditions, on the other hand, the thinking self is called “monkey mind,” and viewed as the resident idiot of the psychological village. …The things Asian philosophers “dropped” on their way to enlightenment were delusions – thoughts that fuel neuroticism and overeating.”

I think one of the big problems with Western thinking is that it doesn’t value reflection. All it takes is a short pause to consider why you are eating before you put any food in your mouth.

There's that moderation word again;

“Another theme that’s stronger in Asian thought than in the West is simply moderation. Ancient Western images of “perfect” humans are extreme: they seek poverty, starve themselves, whip themselves, whip other people. The Buddha, archetypal role model of Asia, wasn’t into that. …Enlightenment in the West is all about self-deprivation. In Eastern thought, it’s about choosing the Middle Way of lovingly detached self-acceptance.”

Here’s how to ignore Lucy and Heather and get on with the business of being lean;

“according to some medical psychologist, it’s physiologically impossible for your mind to stay locked in a war of control when you’re engaging it’s ability to generate compassion and appreciation.”
( )
  Clueless | Feb 16, 2008 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The woman Psychology Today calls "the best-known life coach in America" shatters the myth that willpower is an effective weight-loss tool and introduces a revolutionary approach to lifetime leanness based on a series of "4-Day Wins" that work with any weight-loss program Substitute a good habit for a bad one and stick to it for just 4 days, and it begins to feel normal. That's the surprising discovery that holds the key to lifetime weight control, according to life coach and New York Times best-selling author Martha Beck. Not a conventional diet or exercise program, The Four-Day Win combines evolutionary logic, psychology, and neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to restructure itself, which suggests ways to reshape our bodies) with strategies and success stories--plus large doses of humor and an insightful, straightforward approach to teach the principles required to reverse weight issues. Drawn from hundreds of hours interviewing weight losers--in both her discussions with private clients and her groundbreaking consulting work for Jenny Craig--Dr. Beck reveals: Why willpower-based dieting is doomed to fail How to step out of the conflict between the rule-making Commander (who bans all our favorite foods) and the rule-breaking Resistor (who gives in to cravings) and reach the Watcher, who is our happiest self What the latest research into the mind-body connection reveals about how our emotions affect our eating Breaking down the weight-loss marathon into 4-day intervals, Dr. Beck provides effective strategies for changing the behaviors that make us fat. And if there is a relapse, readers take comfort in knowing they are just 4 days from turning it around.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 2
3 2
3.5
4 5
4.5 1
5 6

GenreThing

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,274,175 books! | Top bar: Always visible