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All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir by Nicole…
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All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir (edition 2018)

by Nicole Chung (Autor)

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3721949,779 (3.78)23
Chung investigates the mysteries and complexities of her transracial adoption in this chronicle of unexpected family for anyone who has struggled to figure out where they belong.Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. She was told her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But Nicole grew up facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn't see, and wondered if the story she'd been told was the whole truth. Here Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, and chronicles the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets. -- adapted from jacket."What does it mean to lose your roots--within your culture, within your family--and what happens when you find them? Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up--facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn't see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from--she wondered if the story she'd been told was the whole truth. With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. [This book] is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets--vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong."--Jacket.… (more)
Member:KABarnes
Title:All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir
Authors:Nicole Chung (Autor)
Info:Ingram Publisher Services (2018), 240 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:to-read

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All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir by Nicole Chung

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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
All You Can Ever Know is the story of Nicole Chung, born prematurely in the U.S. to Korean-immigrant parents and raised by a white couple in a predominantly white town in the Pacific Northwest. When she reached adulthood, Chung began to look for her birth family, and found a reality which both made her re-evaluate her sense of self but also her relationship with her adoptive parents. Chung’s writing is understated and often perceptive, but to be honest I found this book just a little bland. I don’t necessarily need to read about the highest of highs or the lowest of lows in a memoir, but I do hope to encounter some new way of seeing the world. I didn’t get that here. Poignant, but not profound. ( )
  siriaeve | Aug 8, 2020 |
An important, absorbing read for anyone who is adopted, considering adoption, or has adopted family or friends (pretty much everyone). Chung is thoughtful and deep, not letting any aspect of her own adoption or the process that led to her searching for her birth family by without inquiry. With an adopted sibling and friends, I've seen some of these issues work out in real time. Sometimes, I know, the adoptees feel alone in their struggle. Chung is very much with them in that. ( )
  MaximusStripus | Jul 7, 2020 |
Nicole grew up knowing she was adopted, but it wasn't until she was an adult and pregnant for her own child that she decided to search for her birth family. This memoir recounts her wrestling with being a Korean American in an all-white family and town, knowing she was loved but also discovering that her adoption story wasn't as simple as it seemed.

Adoption is complicated. I've known adoptees who were, similarly to Nicole, told as young children that their birth parents couldn't keep them but loved them enough to give them a better life. I thought of them often while I read Nicole's story, though none of them had the added challenge of a transracial adoption. She deals with all sorts of complications, thinking through exactly why she decided to contact her birth family, and what relationships arose as a result (and didn't). Interspersed in her memories are chapters about her sister, Cindy, and her experiences growing up in the family that had chosen to give Nicole up for adoption. Well-told, thought-provoking personal journey, and I'll look forward to discussing it with my book club. ( )
  bell7 | Jun 16, 2020 |
A sensitive portrait of a Korean girl adopted by a whilte family and raised in a white community in Northwest USA. Nicole shares her quest to find her identity and self acceptance through her childhood and young adulthood. Nicole Chung gives insight ito the complexities of belonging to two cultures and occasionally feeling that one does not belong anywhere. ( )
  GayWard | May 7, 2020 |
This is a transracial adoption memoir. Nicole Chung was born very premature to Korean parents and was adopted immediately by a white family. Raised in an Oregon community with no other Asian kids and bullied for being different, she wished to learn more about her birth family. Finding them and eventually spending time with her birth sister, she eventually learned truths about them that profoundly changed her. Nicole's story held my interest, but was not a favorite. ( )
  njinthesun | Mar 19, 2020 |
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Epigraph
I wanted to know,
whoever I was, I was
    ---MARY OLIVER, "Dogfish"
What? You too? I thought I was the only one.
                      ---C.S. LEWIS, The Four Loves
Dedication
for Cindy and for our daughters
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The story my mother told me about them was always the same.
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What was worse, to know nothing? Or to learn things that broke my heart?
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Chung investigates the mysteries and complexities of her transracial adoption in this chronicle of unexpected family for anyone who has struggled to figure out where they belong.Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. She was told her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But Nicole grew up facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn't see, and wondered if the story she'd been told was the whole truth. Here Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, and chronicles the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets. -- adapted from jacket."What does it mean to lose your roots--within your culture, within your family--and what happens when you find them? Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up--facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn't see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from--she wondered if the story she'd been told was the whole truth. With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. [This book] is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets--vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong."--Jacket.

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