HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien
Loading...

The Fall of Gondolin (edition 2018)

by J.R.R. Tolkien (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
749921,356 (4.23)14
In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Tuor and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was 'the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days.… (more)
Member:Htom_Sirveaux
Title:The Fall of Gondolin
Authors:J.R.R. Tolkien (Author)
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2018), Edition: First Edition, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Fall of Gondolin by J. R. R. Tolkien

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 14 mentions

English (8)  Italian (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Like Beren and Luthien and The Children of Hurin and a few of the other recent releases (though this is THE last according to Christopher Tolkien) .... I always feel bad about giving it 3 stars rather than 4, where it could/should probably be, but just can't do it.

Sadly, this is in the same vein. Its barely enough material to meet out a novella, but is then re-told 3 times, and with a ton of add-ons, behind the scenes, and all kinds of things, that by the end unless you're a massive Tolkien and Middle-Earth fan it all becomes jumbled in your head, especially due to some characters having two names (three in some cases) and locations having two names, events happening similar but with slightly different changes or different people involved, etc.

Usually I can keep universes in tact in my mind, many universes at once even (Star Wars, 40K, the main arc canon of Middle-Earth, A Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones {I count them as two unique}, Stover's works, Stackpole's works, Lynch's works, and so many other fantasy and elsewise universes), but the... smaller, lesser, far-back-in-history, archaic stories of Middle-Earth, like this, Children of Hurin, even Silmarillion, etc, I have trouble keeping all in place in my mind.

And I think its kind of because of publications like this. The story of the Fall of Gondolin is about 90 pages, roughly. (Not going back to check on it). It's then re-told. And re-told in smaller portions/pieces another three times roughly. This is all intercut with descriptions, explanations, behind the scenes information, language explanations, etc, by Christopher Tolkien.

The main story itself is wonderfully written, though cuts off (obviously), and starts up with little exposition (again, obvious reasons why). Its a tragic moment in the history of Middle-Earth and the story and telling behind it is done very well as only Tolkien can do.

I think either sadly, I'm not as huge a fan of Middle-Earth/Tolkien as I was in high school, or due to my much larger reading history, getting piece-meal story with lots of behind the scenes, isn't the excitement it was when I first started to see Chris Tolkien releasing JRR's works when I was younger. Too much to keep juggled and up in the air in my head perhaps that reading the same story 3 times with different spellings of key names/places/battles doesn't hold the same excitement as it used to; or the same interest perhaps.

I'm still glad these books and works were released. Don't get me wrong about that. And I definitely know there is a huge market and a huge fan base ready and willing to read all of these (as am I to be honest, just perhaps with after-effect not as much taken out of it as I used to/as most will get out of this work). I think all of the explanations, expositions, behind the scenes, is also tremendous, and a great service Chris is doing to his father's honor and legacy.

Perhaps this is just me merely wishing I got as much out of this as I know most/many will, or maybe wishing for the time when I enjoyed fantasy and Middle-Earth far more than I do now; or perhaps my time is far more limited, so reading the same story three times feels more time-consuming than when I was in high school and time was endless. ( )
  BenKline | Jul 1, 2020 |
Fans of Tolkien and his Silmarillion will not be too disappointed in this book. It's not as recursive as Beren and Luthien and the strong descriptions of Gondolin's destruction are really quite fun.

I mean, who DOESN'T love balrogs and hosts of orcs descending upon and destroying the hidden city of elves in a grand bloody rout? Sure, there's mighty good sendoff and defense, but what we really wanted to see is all those stupid kinslaying elves get theirs.

Hmmm. I might be a bit bloodthirsty today. :) Rah, rah, Melkor?

My only complaint is not directed at Christopher but at J.R.R.

I really wanted not Tuon's story, although it was rather epic, but his son's story: Earendil, with the Silmaril on his brow. Am I asking too much? The way the later victors lose or use the recovered Silmarils? All of that stuff is more interesting to me than how the god of the waters set the first King of Men on a quest. :)

Still. Despite the repeats that show up in other books, I did have a good time with a lot more detail in certain areas. Only by reading ALL of them do we get the idea that big detailed tellings are portioned out for different areas despite getting a good feel in the primary publications. And I mean the Silmarillion. If you like the primary and always wanted to see the tales stretched out and also analyzed, then this is definitely for you.

I'm happy to have read it, although I am filled with a sense of loss. I wish Tolkien was back among us, getting not just credit, but support for more stories. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
If you read The Silmarillion and enjoyed it, then this book will be great. It presents more details, connects well with different myths of Tolkien's universe, and gives you a glimpse into the creative process of how the sausage was made.

If you read The Book of Lost Tales (part 2), then this book will be not so great. It will show you different versions of the story, but any of them nor Christopher's commentary adds a fresh and significant value to the version published in the aforementioned book.

The story of Eärendil made the read worth it for me. This is a small piece, but I loved the way it completes Tolkien's cosmology and mythology. And illustrations, Alen Lee (as always) did a fabulous job here. ( )
  sperzdechly | May 13, 2020 |
Years ago I tried reading The Simarillian after having consumed LOTR and The Hobbit. I failed miserably to enjoy the story, so I did not have a whole lot of hope when starting The Fall of Gondolin. Happily, I loved every minute of it. Almost 40 years of living gained me a greater appreciation of the detailed work that went into Tolkien's masterpiece, LOTR, and the extensive world that he created.

The Fall of Gondolin tells through 3 different tales written by JRR Tolkien during his lifetime of the decimation of the Noldor elves but ultimately where hope would be found 6500 years later. The main character is Tuor, grandfather of Elrond and how he made his way to Gondolin, partook in protecting the city as it fell and ultimately led the remaining elves out of the city.

Christopher Tolkien's commentary about his father and the construction of Middle Earth and the tales set it was also fascinating. ( )
  phoenixcomet | Oct 17, 2019 |
This material should be familiar to all Tolkien readers. The story of the Fall of Gondolin appears in the Silmarillion and is also included in Lost Tales. However, this is the story of how it was written, when it was written and how it evolved. Included are several versions of the tale that were written by Tolkien himself over the years, with commentary from his notes about how the story came to be. The full tale is less than 70 pages long and all of the other versions are shorter, so much of this book is commentary and notes.
This is a fascinating tale from the 2nd Age of Middle-Earth, one of the classic tales of humans and the Noldor and one of the greatest of Tolkien's stories. It is always great to read something new by the master. ( )
1 vote Karlstar | Apr 14, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
The story follows one of the Noldor, Tuor, who sets out to find Gondolin; during his journey, he experiences what the publisher described as "one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth": when Ulmo, the sea-god, rises out of the ocean during a storm.

When Tuor arrives in Gondolin, he becomes a great man and the father of Eärendel, an important character in Tolkien's The Silmarillion. But Morgoth attacks, with Balrogs, dragons and orcs, and as the city falls, Tuor, his wife Idril and the child Eärendel escape, "looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city".

"They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources," said HarperCollins.

[John] Garth said The Fall of Gondolin contains Tolkien's "biggest battle narrative outside of The Lord of the Rings", but he predicted the "capstone" of the book would be the "exquisite" piece of writing in which Tolkien attempted to tell the whole story again, in the novelistic style of The Lord of the Rings. "In the first (finished version) of the story, you feel like you’re reading The Iliad," he said. "This one (which is unfinished), is more naturalistic."

According to HarperCollins, Tolkien saw The Fall of Gondolin as one of his three "great tales" of the Elder Days, along with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin. The latter title was also a bestseller, after Christopher Tolkien completed the text left behind by his father and published it in 2007.

[Several below-the-line comments on the review point out that Tuor was not one of the Noldor, but a mortal man].
added by Cynfelyn | editThe Guardian, Alison Flood (Apr 10, 2018)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tolkien, J. R. R.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lee, AlanIllustrator, cover artistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tolkien, ChristopherEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pesch, Helmut W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To My Family
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Tuor and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was 'the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwe, chief of the Valar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Turin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Earendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Tuor and Idril, with the child Earendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Earendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Luthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was `the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Luthien and The Children of Hurin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.23)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 6
3.5 2
4 15
4.5 4
5 17

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,908,430 books! | Top bar: Always visible