HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of…
Loading...

The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague (Amazing… (edition 2018)

by Julia Finley Mosca (Author), Daniel Rieley (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
12919157,303 (4.49)None
NSTA Outstanding Science Trade Book 2019 Selection NSTA Best STEM Trade Books for Students K-12 2019 Selection 2019 Amelia Bloomer List Selection 2019 Mathical Honor Book Meet Raye Montague--the hidden mastermind who made waves in the U.S. Navy! After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted--finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague is the third book in a riveting educational series about the inspiring lives of amazing scientists. In addition to the illustrated rhyming tale, you'll find a complete biography, fun facts, a colorful timeline of events, and even a note from Montague herself!… (more)
Member:kvanputten
Title:The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague (Amazing Scientists)
Authors:Julia Finley Mosca (Author)
Other authors:Daniel Rieley (Illustrator)
Info:The Innovation Press (2018), 40 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:#read3373, #mathematics, #middleschool, #mathforeveryone, #girlpower, #science

Work details

The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague (Amazing Scientists) by Julia Finley Mosca

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
This true story is nothing short of amazing.

Throughout her life, Raye, born January 21, 1935, was told that as both an African-American and a female, her dream of being an engineer was unrealistic. But Raye, a gifted mathematician, was determined to follow that path ever since she toured a German submarine at age seven.

Since Raye was not admitted into classes intended for engineers, she majored in business in college, and became a typist for the Navy at a facility where submarines were designed. She took computer programming at night school while continuing to work and learn at her job. Her work station was right next to a 1950s UNIVAC I computer, and she watched the engineers operate it. One day when the whole staff was out with the flu, Raye did all the engineers’ work on the UNIVAC, much to the astonishment of her boss, who promoted her to the position of computer systems analyst. She was still treated poorly however, sometimes mistaken for a secretary or maid.

When, in 1971, President Nixon ordered a new submarine that would be “grand” to be built in only two months (a process that usually took up to two years), Raye decided to try designing it herself on a computer. She finished it in just over eighteen hours. (Her white male superiors took credit for the work, and she was not even invited when the ship finally launched in 1978.)

How did she cope? In the ABAB rhyme scheme that characterizes the text, the author notes:

“All her HUMOR and WIT
Served her well through the years,
As she battled the hard times
With LAUGHS and not tears.”

Eventually she gained the recognition she deserved, and even finally got her much coveted degree in engineering, as well as other accolades. In 1984, she accepted the role of the U.S. Navy’s first female program manager of ships, directing teams of up to 250 people. The author also reports in her Afterword that when Raye retired in 1990, she received what she considered her most cherished recognition - a flag flew over the nation’s Capitol building in her honor.

Raye died in 2018 at the age of 83. Throughout her life she was often quoted as saying:

“Aim for the stars. At the very least, you’ll land on the moon.”

The author was able to interview Raye before her death, and Raye penned a further message for readers of this book:

“Always remember that just because someone says ‘you can’t,’ that doesn’t have to stop you. You might have to go in a different direction, and it might take you a little longer, but you CAN achieve your dreams!”

In the end matter, more excerpts from the author’s interview are included, as well as a timeline, guide to further resources, and actual photographs of Raye Montague.

Daniel Rieley created cartoon-like illustrations that manage to be simple and expressive all at once.

Evaluation: I was wowed by the facts in this story for readers aged 4 and up; readers will no doubt be awe-struck as I was. Perhaps some children will be inspired to keep persisting in realizing their own dreams. ( )
  nbmars | May 16, 2020 |
Story of Raye Monague in a easy to read rhyming story. It shows the hurtles she had to overcome as a Black Woman in the field of engineering during a time where Blacks and women were both undervalued and discriminated against. ( )
  cblanco | Apr 28, 2020 |
Who is this Raye Montague? Who ever heard of a black girl who had a "mind for math"? Raye Montague was born in Arkansas. From a little girl, she always had a love of numbers. She never aspired to be a maid. She knew she did not want to wash or cook. She wanted to do what she loved best, work with numbers. Although she faced plenty racial and gender discriminations, she worked her way to becoming not only an engineer, but also a submarine builder; it just wasn't in her favor to receive credit for her own work. White men took that bow instead. But that never stopped Raye. She still pressed on. Eventually, as time progressed, Raye Montague was duly recognized for her contributions and her work. Quiet as kept, Raye knew that eventually the world would "figure it out". ( )
  J.Peterson | Apr 18, 2020 |
This tells the true story of Raye Montague. From the time that Raye was a young girl, she wanted to be an engineer working on submarines. However, she faced many roadblocks because she was black and a female. Raye did not let this stop her. She studied what she could and reached as far as she was able until another opportunity opened up. A position in a submarine company opened up and she took it. She started from the bottom and learned everything she could to reach the top.
This book would make a good addition to any classroom library. While it focuses on the subject of math, it also tells about challenges faced by brilliant people throughout history simply due to their race or sex. It's an inspirational story that can encourage students not to give up, even when others tell them that their interests aren't meant for them. ( )
  KristenJD | Apr 6, 2020 |
This about an African American little girl named Raye Montague who dreamed of becoming a engineer, but that dream was met with adversity. She grew up when woman were not allowed to become engineers, but that did not stop her from living her dreams. She was hired by the Navy and later fulfilled her dream. I think this important to read in any classroom, because children of all races, backgrounds and genders are put down for "dreaming too big", and that should never be the case. If your dreams do not scare you, you are not dreaming big enough. I would read this in my classroom. ( )
  kvanputten | Apr 6, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Julia Finley Moscaprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rieley, DanielIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

NSTA Outstanding Science Trade Book 2019 Selection NSTA Best STEM Trade Books for Students K-12 2019 Selection 2019 Amelia Bloomer List Selection 2019 Mathical Honor Book Meet Raye Montague--the hidden mastermind who made waves in the U.S. Navy! After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted--finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague is the third book in a riveting educational series about the inspiring lives of amazing scientists. In addition to the illustrated rhyming tale, you'll find a complete biography, fun facts, a colorful timeline of events, and even a note from Montague herself!

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.49)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 8
4.5 6
5 17

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,760,222 books! | Top bar: Always visible