HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Artificial unintelligence : how computers…
Loading...

Artificial unintelligence : how computers misunderstand the world (original 2018; edition 2018)

by Meredith Broussard

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1196202,508 (3.57)1
A guide to understanding the inner workings and outer limits of technology and why we should never assume that computers always get it right. In Artificial Unintelligence, Meredith Broussard argues that our collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a tremendous amount of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally--hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners--that we have stopped demanding that our technology actually work. Broussard, a software developer and journalist, reminds us that there are fundamental limits to what we can (and should) do with technology. With this book, she offers a guide to understanding the inner workings and outer limits of technology--and issues a warning that we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism--the belief that technology is always the solution--Broussard argues that it's just not true that social problems would inevitably retreat before a digitally enabled Utopia. To prove her point, she undertakes a series of adventures in computer programming. She goes for an alarming ride in a driverless car, concluding "the cyborg future is not coming any time soon"; uses artificial intelligence to investigate why students can't pass standardized tests; deploys machine learning to predict which passengers survived the Titanic disaster; and attempts to repair the U.S. campaign finance system by building AI software. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.… (more)
Member:SamRaddatz
Title:Artificial unintelligence : how computers misunderstand the world
Authors:Meredith Broussard
Info:Cambridge, Massachusetts : MIT Press, [2018]
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:to-read

Work Information

Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World (The MIT Press) by Meredith Broussard (2018)

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

English (5)  Italian (1)  All languages (6)
Showing 5 of 5
This is much more of an “it’s not you, it’s me” rating. I’ve renewed this book three times and have struggled to get into it, despite being very interested in the material. So I would not discourage you from reading it. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Dec 29, 2020 |
This was excellent. I learned a lot and got mad a lot and learned a very important word: technochauvanism-the belief that tech is always the answer. Of course this belief also has an impact on the people left out of tech-basically anyone who isn’t a white, straight cis male.

There are very important stories in here about classroom textbooks and standardized testing, the Titanic and predicting who would die in the disaster and why you can never predict something with 100% confidence, why self-driving cars will never work and why we won’t want to drive them anyway, and an interesting history of the tech movement and why we have the current white, straight cis male dominated field of tech.

Highly recommend this book. Not too technical for people who have never programmed anything-heck you can even do some beginner programming if you want because the author teaches you how.

Tech is not going to save the world, people are. ( )
  kirkspocks | Nov 2, 2020 |
Why computers are not as smart as people assume, and why real artificial intelligence is not in our immediate futures. talks about how the biases and assumptions of developers colors the tech we use and rely on. ( )
  lilibrarian | Oct 5, 2020 |
What "data journalist" Broussard provides here is sort of a shorter version of Clive Thompson's _Coders_ with, to be sure, somewhat more emphasis on AI-type software. Issues of social justice and "technochauvinism" get a lot of her attention, while those of privacy get too little. She explains how there is nothing magical in machine learning and favors a humans-in-the-loop variety of AI. The most interesting (to me) chapter delves into her skepticism that fully autonomous cars will ever be a reality.
  fpagan | Jul 30, 2019 |
Fun, interesting and thought provoking. What more could you want? The book delivers what the blurbs promise. ( )
  TheoSmit | Jul 5, 2019 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

A guide to understanding the inner workings and outer limits of technology and why we should never assume that computers always get it right. In Artificial Unintelligence, Meredith Broussard argues that our collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a tremendous amount of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally--hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners--that we have stopped demanding that our technology actually work. Broussard, a software developer and journalist, reminds us that there are fundamental limits to what we can (and should) do with technology. With this book, she offers a guide to understanding the inner workings and outer limits of technology--and issues a warning that we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism--the belief that technology is always the solution--Broussard argues that it's just not true that social problems would inevitably retreat before a digitally enabled Utopia. To prove her point, she undertakes a series of adventures in computer programming. She goes for an alarming ride in a driverless car, concluding "the cyborg future is not coming any time soon"; uses artificial intelligence to investigate why students can't pass standardized tests; deploys machine learning to predict which passengers survived the Titanic disaster; and attempts to repair the U.S. campaign finance system by building AI software. If we understand the limits of what we can do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we should do with it to make the world better for everyone.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.57)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 9
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,425,848 books! | Top bar: Always visible