HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Connections in Death by J. D. Robb
Loading...

Connections in Death

by J. D. Robb

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1609109,970 (3.86)32

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 32 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Read it last week, out of my mind by today. Fast read, always entertaining when Eve Dallas and her mega-zillionaire husband Roarke team up to beat the bad guy. But what the actual plot was, I haven't a clue at this point. If you like Dallas and company, you'll be engaged in the story line. ( )
  phoenixcomet | Feb 19, 2019 |
An excellent installment in the In Death series. This was more of a procedural than a mystery and that was fine. Lots of suspense and a fair amount of action, fleeting meetings with some of the other recurring characters and more time with others. Once I started this one I didn't want to put it down. I'm glad that this series stays fresh. ( )
  phyllis2779 | Feb 18, 2019 |
I never tire of this series. The characters...even the side characters...are like family and the reader always looks forward to visiting with them. I believe this is the most "consistent" series in print. Are all the storylines 5 star material? No...but very close and the characters always are. I have only found one book out of the current 48 that I just wasn't as interested in. This one... like all the others...I call "comfort reads". A good story...likable, steady characters...a satisfying outcome...and another one to look forward to. If you are a RIO person start with the first one...and know you have 47 more of this wonderful series. ( )
1 vote Carol420 | Feb 13, 2019 |
As winter is starting to fade into spring, Dallas and Roarke attend a party celebrating Nadine Furst's winning an Oscar for The Icove Agenda. There they meet Rochelle Pickering, a child psychologist Roarke is hoping to hire for his new school and therapy facility for at-risk kids. Unexpectedly, she's there with Crack, the dive owner Dallas has become friendly with over the years and many past cases. Rochelle's family past--both father and a brother into drugs and gang activity--sets off her protective instincts for both Crack and the new school. Crack of course needs no one's protection, and Roarke has already screened her thoroughly, but Dallas, still fairly new at this "having friends" thing, can't help herself. Yet, with the father dead and the brother clean, out of the gang, and building a new life as a future chef, she has little to gripe about.

Barely twenty-four hours later, Rochelle finds her brother Lyle dead, and at first glance it looks like an accidental overdose.

As Dallas and Peobody piece together what happened to Lyle and why, there are two more deaths before they find the answers. It's a difficult, frustrating case, made more frustrating by the fact that the criminals in this case are stupid and keep making unnecessary errors. Dallas is asking herself , why didn't we shut them down sooner? Is the system she's devoted her life to failing?

Not just Dallas, but her family, friends, and colleagues continue to grow and develop as characters, and 2060s New York City becomes a steadily fuller, more realized city.

Recommended.

I bought this audiobook. ( )
  LisCarey | Feb 12, 2019 |
An entertaining mystery in a long-running series. Considering the number of cases Eve has investigated, it's almost astonishing that she hasn't had a run-in with a gang until now. The apparent overdose of former addict and gang-member Lyle is (obviously) murder. The case ties into Eve's personal life since Lyle is the brother of Roarke's new hire to run their new youth center, An Didean.

I love how these books have call backs to prior installments, such as Roarke and Eve's bet that he can't turn a profit from a useless plot of land in Nebraska and the youth centers, since it builds the personal relationships beyond just the mystery. This is especially important since the mysteries aren't quite what they used to be. This story was a bit too predictable, and felt much shorter than previous books. That said, I still enjoyed the book immensely because I've come to love so many of the characters. The humor was still on point, such as this exchange that made me laugh out loud:

"Make sure you're wearing your intimidating rich bastard suit."
"I have no other kind."

Overall, though I wish the mystery had been meatier, I still love spending time with these characters. ( )
  jshillingford | Feb 11, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 2
3 9
3.5 2
4 16
4.5 3
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 133,378,495 books! | Top bar: Always visible