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Is Voting for Young People?

by Martin P. Wattenberg

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For years, political scientists have told their students that it doesn't make a difference whether they vote because one vote won't make a difference. This book is antidote to that argument. -- Richard Niemi, University of Rochester Marty Wattenberg's new book is a brilliant analysis of a big and growing problem in modern democracies; it is also an urgently needed wake-up call. How can we call ourselves a democracy if fewer and fewer people participate in elections and, in addition, if these voters are far from representative of the whole population? The author's recommendations for remedial action, including the adoption of mandatory voting, deserve the most serious consideration. - Arend Lijphart, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of California -- San Diego This text is likely to become one of the seminal works on voting -- readers of all levels cannot help but be impressed by the clarity and strength of Wattenberg's answer to why young people do not vote, and his solution will spur debate about the meanings of democracy, rights, and responsibilities. - Sean Matheson, KnoxCollege This is first-rate scholarship. and integrates competing theories in an accessible manner. Wattenberg's book] makes an important contribution to our understanding of voter participation, while at the same time speaking directly to young people. - Miki Kittilson, ArizonaState University This is a fine example of putting first rate social science research in the service of larger normative concerns. Not everyone will agree with Wattenberg's prescription, but his description of the disengagement of younger citizens here and in other advanced democracies, his explanation for their disengagement, and his identification of the consequences of their disengagement are compelling. - Morris Fiorina, StanfordUniversity Everyone who seeks to understand today's politics, and tomorrow's, ought to read Martin P. Wattenberg's marvelous new book. Today's young adults are not like yesterday's. Even if you had thought they are less interested in politics and in news, you're going to be surprised by how much less involved they are. Democracy here and in Europe faces the disturbing challenge of how to get young people to take part in their governing. HarvardUniversity… (more)
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For years, political scientists have told their students that it doesn't make a difference whether they vote because one vote won't make a difference. This book is antidote to that argument. -- Richard Niemi, University of Rochester Marty Wattenberg's new book is a brilliant analysis of a big and growing problem in modern democracies; it is also an urgently needed wake-up call. How can we call ourselves a democracy if fewer and fewer people participate in elections and, in addition, if these voters are far from representative of the whole population? The author's recommendations for remedial action, including the adoption of mandatory voting, deserve the most serious consideration. - Arend Lijphart, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of California -- San Diego This text is likely to become one of the seminal works on voting -- readers of all levels cannot help but be impressed by the clarity and strength of Wattenberg's answer to why young people do not vote, and his solution will spur debate about the meanings of democracy, rights, and responsibilities. - Sean Matheson, KnoxCollege This is first-rate scholarship. and integrates competing theories in an accessible manner. Wattenberg's book] makes an important contribution to our understanding of voter participation, while at the same time speaking directly to young people. - Miki Kittilson, ArizonaState University This is a fine example of putting first rate social science research in the service of larger normative concerns. Not everyone will agree with Wattenberg's prescription, but his description of the disengagement of younger citizens here and in other advanced democracies, his explanation for their disengagement, and his identification of the consequences of their disengagement are compelling. - Morris Fiorina, StanfordUniversity Everyone who seeks to understand today's politics, and tomorrow's, ought to read Martin P. Wattenberg's marvelous new book. Today's young adults are not like yesterday's. Even if you had thought they are less interested in politics and in news, you're going to be surprised by how much less involved they are. Democracy here and in Europe faces the disturbing challenge of how to get young people to take part in their governing. HarvardUniversity

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