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The past and other things that should stay…
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The past and other things that should stay buried (edition 2019)

by Shaun David Hutchinson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1425150,247 (3.9)1
A Hypable Most Anticipated Queer YA Book of 2019 A Book Riot YA Book to Add to Your Winter TBR and Most Anticipated 2019 LGBTQ Read A BookBub Best Teen Book Coming Out in 2019 A YALSA 2020 Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers "A fearless and brutal look at friendships...you will laugh, rage, and mourn its loss when it's over." --Justina Ireland, New York Times bestselling author of Dread Nation "Simultaneously hilarious and moving, weird and wonderful." --Jeff Zentner, Morris Award-winning author of The Serpent King Six Feet Under meets Pushing Daisies in this quirky, heartfelt story about two teens who are granted extra time to resolve what was left unfinished after one of them suddenly dies. A good friend will bury your body, a best friend will dig you back up. Dino doesn't mind spending time with the dead. His parents own a funeral home, and death is literally the family business. He's just not used to them talking back. Until Dino's ex-best friend July dies suddenly--and then comes back to life. Except not exactly. Somehow July is not quite alive, and not quite dead. As Dino and July attempt to figure out what's happening, they must also confront why and how their friendship ended so badly, and what they have left to understand about themselves, each other, and all those grand mysteries of life. Critically acclaimed author Shaun Hutchinson delivers another wholly unique novel blending the real and surreal while reminding all of us what it is to love someone through and around our faults.… (more)
Member:Mrs.Nicaj
Title:The past and other things that should stay buried
Authors:Shaun David Hutchinson
Info:New York : Simon Pulse, 2019.
Collections:Your library
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The Past and Other Things That Should Stay Buried by Shaun David Hutchinson

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Showing 5 of 5
teen fiction w/undead ex-best friend and LGBTQA interest (main character is gay; his boyfriend is trans), touches on mental health/depression/suicide.
The conversation about having control over one's own feelings (as opposed to being able to control other peoples' feelings) could've been handled a little more sensitively, considering that one of the minor characters had an eating disorder and another, unnamed minor character was clinically depressed and suicidal--there can be chemical imbalances and other reasons why a person cannot just "get over" their mental health issues. I don't think the author meant it that way, I've just become more aware of how we talk about these things lately. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Actual Rating: 4.5 stars

This was a quick read - I knocked it out in an afternoon. It was funny and sweet and a little sad and honestly I sort of wished it didn’t end, for a lot of reasons, the largest of which I can’t say because it’s a spoiler.

I think everyone who’s no longer in high school remembers their best best friend - the other half of you who could read your mind/finish your sentences/drive you insane like no one else could. And probably for a lot of people, that person isn’t in your life anymore. Sometimes it’s because you drifted apart between college and relationships and what have you. Sometimes it’s because you both became someone the other didn’t recognize as you grew up. But even though you don’t talk anymore, you still think of the memories you had and love them for it.

This book in part deals with the dissolution of that friendship - why it happens, and how to let go of the grief and anger, and how to fix that friendship if it’s fixable. Or maybe it doesn’t deal with that, and that’s just what my heart and head needed to get out of it.

But regardless, I definitely recommend the book if you feel like laughing and crying and being a little grossed out. ( )
  zombiibean | Nov 20, 2020 |
Dino works in the family business, that is, a funeral home so he doesn't mind being around dead bodies.But this body prep is special: it's his best friend, July, who died suddenly of a brain aneurysm. Imagine his shock then when July suddenly wakes up! She's not alive but she's not dead and she's not a zombie, either (no brain-eating in this book). In this limbo state July and Dino argue, cry, drive around, hide out, go to a (weird) party and generally try to figure out their relationship and what is going on. July's decomposing body makes for some colorful scenes (not for the squeamish) and unintended humor. There are some important 'lessons' about loving yourself and allowing yourself to be loved but this reader could never get beyond July's narcissistic actions and words. Others may quibble about the suspension of belief needed to continue reading this story; July's casual lying and cruelty were far more disturbing than any weird nondead stuff. ( )
  mjspear | Jan 29, 2020 |
Two great young characters in Dino and July, and told in their two separate points of view. This is a story about friendship, but also about bereavement. It's a humorous told book, yet touching in all the right ways. ( )
  PaperDollLady | Sep 2, 2019 |
“Death is as normal and digestion. People move through life the way food moves through our bodies. Their natural usefulness is extracted along the way to help enrich the world, and when they have nothing left to give, they’re eliminated. Much like our bodies would clog up with excrement if we didn’t defecate, the world would do the same if we didn’t die.”

I wish this book encompassed everything this quote is, but unfortunately, it fell short. Shaun David Hutchinson's male protagonists are all the same. I wanted Dino to be different. It's the same character with a different storyline. Dino loses his ex-best friend, July, to a sudden brain aneurysm, where he then finds her at his parent's mortuary.
The morbidity of having to dress someone you know for their funeral was enough to grab my attention, but then things went downhill. This book is the epitome of "the world revolves around me" teenage mentality that so many older readers despise, myself included. As readers, we're supposed to enjoy the ride of the entire world's population immune to death as one teenager tries to leave things on good terms with her friend. Are you kidding me? Not to sound insensitive, but the reason for the rift wasn't that big of a deal. It's something that best friends should have gotten through. But then again, how can a book explore the complexity of teenage emotion without having something silly to fight about and rectify? The writing is excellent, but the characters and plot weren't there for me. ( )
  Dasha_A | Jun 8, 2019 |
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A Hypable Most Anticipated Queer YA Book of 2019 A Book Riot YA Book to Add to Your Winter TBR and Most Anticipated 2019 LGBTQ Read A BookBub Best Teen Book Coming Out in 2019 A YALSA 2020 Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers "A fearless and brutal look at friendships...you will laugh, rage, and mourn its loss when it's over." --Justina Ireland, New York Times bestselling author of Dread Nation "Simultaneously hilarious and moving, weird and wonderful." --Jeff Zentner, Morris Award-winning author of The Serpent King Six Feet Under meets Pushing Daisies in this quirky, heartfelt story about two teens who are granted extra time to resolve what was left unfinished after one of them suddenly dies. A good friend will bury your body, a best friend will dig you back up. Dino doesn't mind spending time with the dead. His parents own a funeral home, and death is literally the family business. He's just not used to them talking back. Until Dino's ex-best friend July dies suddenly--and then comes back to life. Except not exactly. Somehow July is not quite alive, and not quite dead. As Dino and July attempt to figure out what's happening, they must also confront why and how their friendship ended so badly, and what they have left to understand about themselves, each other, and all those grand mysteries of life. Critically acclaimed author Shaun Hutchinson delivers another wholly unique novel blending the real and surreal while reminding all of us what it is to love someone through and around our faults.

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