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Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 5th…
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Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 5th Edition (original 2000; edition 2011)

by Mark M. Lowenthal (Author)

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232191,951 (3.57)1
Intelligence veteran Mark M. Lowenthal details how the intelligence community′s history, structure, procedures, and functions affect policy decisions. With straightforward and friendly prose, the book demystifies a complex process. The fifth edition highlights crucial developments and new challenges in the intelligence community, including: - changes in the management of U.S. intelligence and the fourth DNI in five years; - obama administration policies; - developments in collection and analysis; - the killing of bin Laden, Wikileaks, and updates on Russia, North Korea, China, and the Middle East; - the ability to handle the shift from large-scale attacks to smaller, individual attempts; - expanded coverage of foreign intelligence services and new coverage of intelligence in authoritarian regimes.… (more)
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Title:Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 5th Edition
Authors:Mark M. Lowenthal (Author)
Info:CQ Press (2011), Edition: 5th, 386 pages
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Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy by Mark M. Lowenthal (2000)

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Mark M. Lowenthal wrote this book to fill a gap he had identified in instruction on the intelligence community. He found that many texts dealt in specifics, without first addressing the general background information Lowenthal's college students seemed to need most. He wrote this text as a starting point for his course material, to provide students the necessary foundation for further inquiry.

This book is full of facts -- fact after fact after fact to get the student of intelligence up to snuff. Eventually, all the declarative sentences start to wear on one's patience. Also, redundancy abounds: I'm surprised to find myself reading and re-reading the same material. Perhaps this repetition is intended as an instructive tool for students who may not read the book cover to cover... or maybe it's just a sign of a lazy editor. Either way, it adds an unfortunate degree of tedium to an otherwise interesting read.

The material itself is fascinating, and the prose is accessible for any reader, even those with no prior acquaintance with the subject. But the book is an instruction text more than it is a narrative, and as such, it's probably better suited for scholastic readers, rather than those with a casual interest in the subject. It may be an easy read, but it's not exactly light reading.
  Eneles | Jan 10, 2010 |
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Intelligence veteran Mark M. Lowenthal details how the intelligence community′s history, structure, procedures, and functions affect policy decisions. With straightforward and friendly prose, the book demystifies a complex process. The fifth edition highlights crucial developments and new challenges in the intelligence community, including: - changes in the management of U.S. intelligence and the fourth DNI in five years; - obama administration policies; - developments in collection and analysis; - the killing of bin Laden, Wikileaks, and updates on Russia, North Korea, China, and the Middle East; - the ability to handle the shift from large-scale attacks to smaller, individual attempts; - expanded coverage of foreign intelligence services and new coverage of intelligence in authoritarian regimes.

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Spies, bugs, moles, double-agents, drop-offs, covert action. The world of intelligence is filled with intrigue, but at its core, the information-secret or otherwise-is valuable to governments for the power it affords policy makers. With the constant need for background, context, and warning as well as an assessment of risks, benefits, and likely outcomes, the intelligence community plays a crucial role in policy formation. Lowenthal adeptly describes the development of this community while showing students how the various stages of the intelligence process serve an intelligence agenda that has changed dramatically in this post-Cold War, post-9/11 world. In this thoroughly revised second edition, Lowenthal updates each and every chapter, including new material on the infamous Robert Hanssen and Wen Ho Lee cases. Two new chapters significantly round out coverage: one on intelligence reform and another that takes a comparative look at intelligence in Britain, France, Russia, Israel, and China. This new edition also takes into account the impact and effects the war on terrorism now has on collection, analysis, and counter intelligence, as well as the ethical and moral issues surrounding these tasks.
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