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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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Jane Eyre (original 1847; edition 2000)

by Charlotte Bronte (Author)

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49,80080018 (4.22)6 / 2821
In early nineteenth-century England, an orphaned young woman accepts employment as a governess and soon finds herself in love with her employer who has a terrible secret.
Member:SmithLibrarian
Title:Jane Eyre
Authors:Charlotte Bronte (Author)
Info:Penguin Books Ltd (2000), Edition: New edition, 576 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (1847)

  1. 482
    Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (Bonzer, chrisharpe, fannyprice)
    chrisharpe: There are some similarities between these two books: a young woman marries an older widower and moves to his mansion, where the marriage is challenged by the unearthly presence of the first wife.
    fannyprice: These two books reminded me a lot of each other but Rebecca was more modern and somewhat less preachy.
  2. 406
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (TineOliver)
    TineOliver: Debates about which is the greater love story have raged between book lovers for years. Why not read both and form your own opinion?
  3. 377
    The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde (Kerian, westher, deepikasd)
    Kerian: If for some reason you read The Eyre Affair without having read Jane Eyre, I definitely recommend it. It will certainly be interesting to read and is a very good book.
    westher: Voor als je wilt weten hoe de verhaallijn ontstaan is ;-)
    deepikasd: This story also gives you a different spin and shows how the story is "changed" to what it is today. Though the story is a parody, the reader who loves Jane Eyre will definitely love meeting the characters again and relish the story all over.
  4. 3813
    Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (roby72, gabynation6)
    gabynation6: these authors were sisters
  5. 309
    Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (stephmo, aces, JenniferLivingstone)
    stephmo: Written as the story of the first Mrs. Rochester. While this may not be the light we want to remember Mr. Rochester in, it leads to a richer picture of the man he becomes for Jane.
  6. 162
    Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë (Medellia)
  7. 141
    The Brontës: Wild Genius on the Moors by Juliet Barker (Wraith_Ravenscroft)
  8. 218
    The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield (norabelle414)
    norabelle414: Both gothic novels, with a big ol' creepy house, and theme of hidden family secrets
  9. 141
    Villette by Charlotte Brontë (Wraith_Ravenscroft, allenmichie)
  10. 92
    Jenna Starborn by Sharon Shinn (infiniteletters)
    infiniteletters: An interesting retelling.
  11. 82
    The Turn of the Screw by Henry James (hazzabamboo)
  12. 93
    The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (ncgraham)
    ncgraham: Two Victorian heroines approach the question of how to reconcile passion and morality in very different ways.
  13. 61
    The Mysterious Howling by Maryrose Wood (_Zoe_)
    _Zoe_: The Mysterious Howling offers a fresh perspective on the young governess arriving at a mysterious new place of employment. It's tongue-in-cheek and very funny--definitely an enjoyable read for those who don't take Jane Eyre too seriously.
  14. 149
    Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (Maiasaura)
  15. 61
    Aurora Leigh by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (ElizabethPotter)
    ElizabethPotter: This is like Jane Eyre in verse.
  16. 51
    The Victorian Governess by Kathryn Hughes (susanbooks)
  17. 40
    Jane, the Fox, and Me by Fanny Britt (JenniferLivingstone)
    JenniferLivingstone: If you're a fan of Jane Eyre, you might enjoy the children's book Jane, the Fox, and Me. It's a sweet story about a young girl who has trouble with bullying and self-esteem - and who is able to find comfort from the book Jane Eyre. Highly, highly recommended.… (more)
  18. 1410
    Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (lanaing)
  19. 30
    Charlotte Brontë: A Passionate Life by Lyndall Gordon (MissBrangwen)
  20. 41
    Linden Hills by Gloria Naylor (susanbooks)
    susanbooks: Naylor so brilliantly plays w/Dante & Jane Eyre

(see all 35 recommendations)

1840s (4)
Europe (267)
Romans (11)
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Showing 1-5 of 754 (next | show all)
Jane has her own mind to move b/w houses she is comfortable. The ghosts of Uncle reed & the moors! ( )
  rachel_parkington1 | Jul 22, 2021 |
I love it when there is a happy ending. ( )
  Conni_W | Jul 7, 2021 |
Well, I enjoyed the first 100 or so pages, then it dragged for about 100, then I enjoyed the next 200 or so... Then it dragged for 100, and then the ending came. Most of the time, I quite liked Jane as a character. She's quietly but fiercely independent, has some humor in her, and really seems to want everyone else to just shut up and leave her alone. Sadly, most of the other characters are rather boring (besides, of course, you-know-who upstairs).

I'm still not entirely sure where I stand with this book, but I am glad to have read it. ( )
  mw724 | Jul 7, 2021 |
Fantastic read and now a fantastic listen.

I first read Jane Eyre in high school, the story never leaves you. I have sense purchased multiple copies for my libraries, recommended it to countless readers, can to this day read it with appreciation (not true of all books that I love), but now I have another way of enjoying this wonderful book - audiobook.

Just as compelling as the print, narrator Thandiwe Newton did a wonderful job of bringing the book to life.

Highly recommended.
  Gmomaj | Jun 21, 2021 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Jane Eyre
Series: ----------
Author: Charlotte Bronte
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Classic
Pages: 503
Words: 190.5K

Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

Gateshead Hall

Jane Eyre, aged 10, lives at Gateshead Hall with her maternal uncle's family, the Reeds, as a result of her uncle's dying wish. Jane was orphaned several years earlier when her parents died of typhus. Mr. Reed, Jane's uncle, was the only member of the Reed family who was ever kind to Jane. Jane's aunt, Sarah Reed, dislikes her, abuses her, and treats her as a burden, and Mrs. Reed discourages her three children from associating with Jane. Jane, as a result, becomes defensive against her cruel judgement. The nursemaid, Bessie, proves to be Jane's only ally in the household, even though Bessie occasionally scolds Jane harshly. Excluded from the family activities, Jane leads an unhappy childhood, with only a doll and books with which to entertain herself.

One day, as punishment for defending herself against her cousin John Reed, Jane is relegated to the red room in which her late uncle had died; there, she faints from panic after she thinks she has seen his ghost. The red room is significant because it lays the grounds for the "ambiguous relationship between parents and children" which plays out in all of Jane's future relationships with male figures throughout the novel.[7] She is subsequently attended to by the kindly apothecary Mr. Lloyd to whom Jane reveals how unhappy she is living at Gateshead Hall. He recommends to Mrs. Reed that Jane should be sent to school, an idea Mrs. Reed happily supports. Mrs. Reed then enlists the aid of the harsh Mr. Brocklehurst, who is the director of Lowood Institution, a charity school for girls, to enroll Jane. Mrs. Reed cautions Mr. Brocklehurst that Jane has a "tendency for deceit", which he interprets as Jane being a liar. Before Jane leaves, however, she confronts Mrs. Reed and declares that she'll never call her "aunt" again. Jane also tells Mrs. Reed and her daughters, Georgiana and Eliza, that they are the ones who are deceitful, and that she will tell everyone at Lowood how cruelly the Reeds treated her. Mrs. Reed is hurt badly by these words, but does not have the courage or tenacity to show this.[8]

Lowood Institution

At Lowood Institution, a school for poor and orphaned girls, Jane soon finds that life is harsh. She attempts to fit in and befriends an older girl, Helen Burns. During a class session, her new friend is criticised for her poor stance and dirty nails, and receives a lashing as a result. Later, Jane tells Helen that she could not have borne such public humiliation, but Helen philosophically tells her that it would be her duty to do so. Jane then tells Helen how badly she has been treated by Mrs. Reed, but Helen tells her that she would be far happier if she did not bear grudges. In due course, Mr. Brocklehurst visits the school. While Jane is trying to make herself look inconspicuous, she accidentally drops her slate, thereby drawing attention to herself. She is then forced to stand on a stool, and is branded a sinner and a liar. Later, Miss Temple, the caring superintendent, facilitates Jane's self-defence and publicly clears her of any wrongdoing. Helen and Miss Temple are Jane's two main role models who positively guide her development, despite the harsh treatment she has received from many others.

The 80 pupils at Lowood are subjected to cold rooms, poor meals, and thin clothing. Many students fall ill when a typhus epidemic strikes; Helen dies of consumption in Jane's arms. When Mr. Brocklehurst's maltreatment of the students is discovered, several benefactors erect a new building and install a sympathetic management committee to moderate Mr. Brocklehurst's harsh rule. Conditions at the school then improve dramatically.

Thornfield Hall

After six years as a student and two as a teacher at Lowood, Jane decides to leave in pursuit of a new life, growing bored of her life at Lowood. Her friend and confidante, Miss Temple, also leaves after getting married. Jane advertises her services as a governess in a newspaper. A housekeeper at Thornfield Hall, Alice Fairfax, replies to Jane's advertisement. Jane takes the position, teaching Adèle Varens, a young French girl.

One night, while Jane is carrying a letter to the post from Thornfield, a horseman and dog pass her. The horse slips on ice and throws the rider. Despite the rider's surliness, Jane helps him get back onto his horse. Later, back at Thornfield, she learns that this man is Edward Rochester, master of the house. Adèle was left in his care when her mother abandoned her. It is not immediately apparent whether Adèle is Rochester's daughter or not.

At Jane's first meeting with Mr. Rochester, he teases her, accusing her of bewitching his horse to make him fall. Jane stands up to his initially arrogant manner, despite his strange behaviour. Mr. Rochester and Jane soon come to enjoy each other's company, and they spend many evenings together.

Odd things start to happen at the house, such as a strange laugh being heard, a mysterious fire in Mr. Rochester's room (from which Jane saves Rochester by rousing him and throwing water on him and the fire), and an attack on a house-guest named Mr. Mason.

After Jane saves Mr. Rochester from the fire, he thanks her tenderly and emotionally, and that night Jane feels strange emotions of her own towards him. The next day however he leaves unexpectedly for a distant party gathering, and several days later returns with the whole party, including the beautiful and talented Blanche Ingram. Jane sees that Blanche and Mr. Rochester favour each other and starts to feel jealous, particularly because she also sees that Blanche is snobbish and heartless.

Jane then receives word that Mrs. Reed has suffered a stroke and is calling for her. Jane returns to Gateshead and remains there for a month to tend to her dying aunt. Mrs. Reed confesses to Jane that she wronged her, bringing forth a letter from Jane's paternal uncle, Mr. John Eyre, in which he asks for her to live with him and be his heir. Mrs. Reed admits to telling Mr. Eyre that Jane had died of fever at Lowood. Soon afterward, Mrs. Reed dies, and Jane helps her cousins after the funeral before returning to Thornfield.

Back at Thornfield, Jane broods over Mr. Rochester's rumoured impending marriage to Blanche Ingram. However, one midsummer evening, Rochester baits Jane by saying how much he will miss her after getting married and how she will soon forget him. The normally self-controlled Jane reveals her feelings for him. Rochester then is sure that Jane is sincerely in love with him, and he proposes marriage. Jane is at first skeptical of his sincerity, before accepting his proposal. She then writes to her Uncle John, telling him of her happy news.

As she prepares for her wedding, Jane's forebodings arise when a strange woman sneaks into her room one night and rips Jane's wedding veil in two. As with the previous mysterious events, Mr. Rochester attributes the incident to Grace Poole, one of his servants. During the wedding ceremony, however, Mr. Mason and a lawyer declare that Mr. Rochester cannot marry because he is already married to Mr. Mason's sister, Bertha. Mr. Rochester admits this is true but explains that his father tricked him into the marriage for her money. Once they were united, he discovered that she was rapidly descending into congenital madness, and so he eventually locked her away in Thornfield, hiring Grace Poole as a nurse to look after her. When Grace gets drunk, Rochester's wife escapes and causes the strange happenings at Thornfield.

It turns out that Jane's uncle, Mr. John Eyre, is a friend of Mr. Mason's and was visited by him soon after Mr. Eyre received Jane's letter about her impending marriage. After the marriage ceremony is broken off, Mr. Rochester asks Jane to go with him to the south of France and live with him as husband and wife, even though they cannot be married. Jane is tempted but must stay true to her Christian values and beliefs. Refusing to go against her principles, and despite her love for Rochester, Jane leaves Thornfield at dawn before anyone else is up.[9]

Moor House

Jane travels as far from Thornfield as she can using the little money she had previously saved. She accidentally leaves her bundle of possessions on the coach and is forced to sleep on the moor. She unsuccessfully attempts to trade her handkerchief and gloves for food. Exhausted and starving, she eventually makes her way to the home of Diana and Mary Rivers but is turned away by the housekeeper. She collapses on the doorstep, preparing for her death. Clergyman St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary's brother, rescues her. After Jane regains her health, St. John finds her a teaching position at a nearby village school. Jane becomes good friends with the sisters, but St. John remains aloof.

The sisters leave for governess jobs, and St. John becomes slightly closer to Jane. St. John learns Jane's true identity and astounds her by telling her that her uncle, John Eyre, has died and left her his entire fortune of 20,000 pounds (equivalent to just over $2 million in 2021[10]). When Jane questions him further, St. John reveals that John Eyre is also his and his sisters' uncle. They had once hoped for a share of the inheritance but were left virtually nothing. Jane, overjoyed by finding that she has living and friendly family members, insists on sharing the money equally with her cousins, and Diana and Mary come back to live at Moor House.

Proposals

Thinking that the pious and conscientious Jane will make a suitable missionary's wife, St. John asks her to marry him and to go with him to India, not out of love, but out of duty. Jane initially accepts going to India but rejects the marriage proposal, suggesting they travel as brother and sister. As soon as Jane's resolve against marriage to St. John begins to weaken, she mystically hears Mr. Rochester's voice calling her name. Jane then returns to Thornfield to find only blackened ruins. She learns that Mr. Rochester's wife set the house on fire and died after jumping from the roof. In his rescue attempts, Mr. Rochester lost a hand and his eyesight. Jane reunites with him, but he fears that she will be repulsed by his condition. "Am I hideous, Jane?", he asks. "Very, sir; you always were, you know", she replies. When Jane assures him of her love and tells him that she will never leave him, Mr. Rochester proposes again, and they are married. They live together in an old house in the woods called Ferndean Manor. Rochester regains sight in one eye two years after his and Jane's marriage, and he sees their newborn son.

My Thoughts:

I did not enjoy this nearly as much as I did back in 2009. The majority of that is because the writing style just didn't work for me this time around. It just felt overwrought and over emotional. Much like Dickens, Charlotte wrote floridly and rather umm, descriptively. Unlike Dickens, it simply didn't work for me. At all.

As much as I loved Wuthering Heights last year, I suspect this read through of the Bronte sisters is going to be my first, and last, time spent with them. Wuthering caught me in the perfect spot and I doubt circumstances will so align again. At the same time, I can see why these are foundational to Classic literature.

This was a very odd read as I hated the style but still appreciated what Charlotte was doing. Jane Eyre is no saint or milksop. She's a devil of a child, then an extremely proud young woman who almost starves to death because of her pride. What she isn't is abrasive, rude or stupid.

While not getting the highest marks, I was overall satisfied with this final read. It is good to go out on a good note.

★★★✬☆ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Jun 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 754 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (92 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charlotte Brontëprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bell, CurrerAuthormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
BrontëAuthormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Becker, May LambertonIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bickford-Smith, CoralieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Booker, NellIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brett, SimonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cabot, MegIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Darcy, DameIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davies, StevieEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davis, Joe LeeIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dèttore, UgoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eggink, ClaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eichenberg, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ericksen, SusanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freedman, BarnettIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibson, FloNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gilpin, SamAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haapanen, TyyniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ibbett, MaryIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jong, EricaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Klett, ElizabethNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leavis, Q. D.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marcireau, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mason, MichaelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mathias, RobertCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCaddon, WandaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mills, JulietNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Minogue, SallyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, KathyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Newton, ThandieNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oates, Joyce CarolIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roos, Elisabeth deIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roos, Elisabeth deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Root, AmandaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scott, LucyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shorter, Clement K.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, MargaretEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevenson, JulietNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
W., C.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weisser, Susan OstrovIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Westendorp, FiepIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Edward A.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zeiger, ArthurAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
To
W.M. THACKERAY, ESQ.
This work is
respectfully inscribed

by
THE AUTHOR
First words
There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.
Preface
A preface to the first edition of 'Jane Eyre' being unnecessary, I gave none: this second edition demands a few words both of acknowledgment and miscellaneous remark.
Quotations
I could not answer the ceaseless inward question—why I thus suffered; now, at the distance of—I will not say how many years, I see it clearly.
Do you think because I am poor, obscure, plain and little that I am souless and heartless? You think wrong. I have as much soul as you and full as much heart, and if God had granted me some beauty and much wealth I should have made it as hard for you to leave me as it is now for me to leave you.
Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
To have yielded would have been an error of principle; to have yielded now would have been an error in judgement.
I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the complete, unabridged Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Do not combine with any abridged versions, Norton Critical Editions, or vampire books.
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Wikipedia in English (6)

In early nineteenth-century England, an orphaned young woman accepts employment as a governess and soon finds herself in love with her employer who has a terrible secret.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Jane Eyre is the story of a love-deprived girl who becomes the governess of a young french girl at a the Rochester estate. Jane's boss, Mr Rochester is mysterious and reclusive. As romance develops between Jane and Rochester not all is as it seems. There are strange noises in the night and Jane believes a servant is trying to kill Rochester. Nothing at the Rochester estate is as she expects.
historia de amor
Haiku summary
She's poor and orphaned
But educated and proud
Boss gets all fired up.
(pickupsticks)

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