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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life…
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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World (edition 2019)

by Cal Newport (Author)

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6241226,867 (3.91)6
A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.… (more)
Member:pqfuller
Title:Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World
Authors:Cal Newport (Author)
Info:Portfolio (2019), 304 pages
Collections:To read
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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport

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» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Have you been more tired, irritable, and distracted then years past? It could be that you are a slave to your digital devices and their applications. Social media companies like Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Twitter are aggressively trying to capture your attention. In fact, they are using brain science against you. Cal Newport has been making his way around the podcasting circuits talking about this attention-grabbing and his new book, Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
A generous 3. Not really anything here that hasn't been written before, with far too much focus on anecdotal evidence. Newport also doesn't seem to understand videogames particularly well and frequently writes from an annoyingly un-selfaware position of privilege (why not try leaving work early to go on a long walk?). ( )
  arewenotben | Jul 31, 2020 |
Some decent stuff in there, but not sure it warranted an entire book. ( )
  Aaron.Cohen | May 28, 2020 |
Listened to this on audio book. Some great ideas and tips on getting out of technology to actually live a life. I never have been a big phone user which was the main thrust of the book but I am more aware of my online use of technonolgy now adn try to keep it a minimum. ( )
  Neale | Apr 18, 2020 |
I have to give this five stars.

First off, I am trying to reduce my screentime. So I have a desire to do so. That is why this book was so beneficial to me. If you don't have that desire, then you certainly should pass on this book.

I'm addicted to my phone. Without a doubt. And I need help. This book provided it for me in a practical way. And also in a way that gives me hope that I actually can cut down on my phone use.

The book confirmed a lot of suspicions I had about my phone addiction. It also let me know that I'm not crazy and plenty of other people go through the same experiences as me. It's also worth noting that the goal of this book is not to eliminate your technology all together, but it's to use it in a different way.

For example, the 30 day detox section was brilliant. It speaks about setting up specific barriers and then slowly introducing these apps back into your life. The goal is then realizing that you don't need these apps as much as you thought.

Another practical tip from the book is learning how to handle social media like a "professional." That section alone made me realize, I really don't need social media on my phone at all. I could accomplish everything I need from a "professional" level from my laptop once a day. If that.

If you've arrived at the conclusion, or realization, that you have a problem with technology consuming all of your minutes, get this book. I'm excited to go back through this book again. ( )
  bradweber1982 | Jan 18, 2020 |
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A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.

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