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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life…
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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World (edition 2019)

by Cal Newport (Author)

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1,2063413,901 (3.89)8
A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.… (more)
Member:pqfuller
Title:Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World
Authors:Cal Newport (Author)
Info:Portfolio (2019), 304 pages
Collections:To read
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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport

  1. 00
    The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power by Shoshana Zuboff (timoroso)
    timoroso: If you find Zuboff too heavy and academic, Newport discusses similar ideas from a more practical standpoint. Still, Newport’s book is no replacement for Zuboff’s.
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» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
Go a month without apps and phones, then bring things back gradually to see what you really need. Use apps only for certain purposes and at certain times. He says he's not into hacks because they don't work; you need to really go without, and then go minimalist; but I don't see how his advice differs from hacks. I don't think I came away with any new insight. I already use apps only for targeted purposes and particular times. Oh! I did like the metaphor of Facebook and its ilk being like a slot machine - pull the lever, what will I get? How many likes, loves, comments? Cherry, cherry... mule. But that wasn't even his metaphor; someone said it on 60 Minutes. ( )
  Tytania | Dec 4, 2022 |
This is a great book about approaching technology from a perspective of serving our values. ( )
  MichaelK12345 | Oct 9, 2022 |
3.5 stars - overall a good book about how draining social media and mindless scrolling can be on health and happiness. Some good ideas on how to cut down on your dependence on your phone. ( )
  thewestwing | Aug 12, 2022 |
Digital Minimalism has a few tips about how to rein in social media use that I found helpful (e.g., bookmark the Events page on Facebook so you can go straight to it without risking being distracted by your newsfeed--simple genius!) and a lot of philosophizing from a wealthy cis white male perspective that was less so.

Dude. And I do mean "Dude." Women generally need to keep our phones with us when we're out and about for safety reasons (and many of us can't afford a second "dumb" phone to tether to our smart phone). Nor can we just take a walk whenever we want without considerations for what time it gets dark or what the neighborhood is like, especially not without our phones. When you saw all those folks on the New York City street corner who were all wearing earbuds, how many of them were women? Probably not many, because we are expected to maintain situational awareness at all times, which you can't do if you can't hear what's going on around you. And if we violate any of these tenets and something goes wrong, we are to blame.

A book that had the potential to be interesting and helpful just became another "lemme tell you what you should think" tome by a mediocre white dude who doesn't actually have much new to say.

I mean I already know that too much social media is bad for me and I already deleted Facebook off my phone. What else ya got? ( )
  IVLeafClover | Jun 21, 2022 |
Wish it was based in research and brain science rather than research-like anecdotes and individual storytelling experiences. Wanted to like it but could have used a research partner to do a lot review prior to writing. ( )
  Automaticleigh | Mar 3, 2022 |
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A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.

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