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The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past,…
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The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the… (edition 2018)

by Ryder Carroll (Author)

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6162428,805 (3.97)6
For years, Ryder Carroll tried countless organizing systems, online and off, but none of them fit the way his mind worked. Out of sheer necessity, he developed a method called the Bullet Journal that helped him become consistently focused and effective. When he started sharing his system with friends who faced similar challenges, it went viral. Just a few years later, to his astonishment, Bullet Journaling is a global movement. The Bullet Journal Method is about much more than organizing your notes and to-do lists. It's about what Carroll calls "intentional living": weeding out distractions and focusing your time and energy in pursuit of what's truly meaningful, in both your work and your personal life. It's about spending more time with what you care about, by working on fewer things. Carroll wrote this book for frustrated list-makers, overwhelmed multitaskers, and creatives who need some structure. Whether you've used a Bullet Journal for years or have never seen one before, The Bullet Journal Method will help you go from passenger to pilot of your own life.… (more)
Member:robynclark
Title:The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future
Authors:Ryder Carroll (Author)
Info:Portfolio (2018), 320 pages
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The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future by Ryder Carroll

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Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
At first I wasn't going to buy this book.

I used a bullet journal (or "bujo") for about six months last year and enjoyed it, but didn't keep up with it. During that time I read articles on Carroll's site, watched his videos and those of dozens of other bujo enthusiasts, and browsed Pinterest for inspiration. The essential idea appealed to me, but for reasons I couldn't quite put my finger on it ultimately fell flat. Why would I want to buy a book about a system which didn't work for me? I still liked the system. And I thought that maybe having all the crucial information in one analog location would be helpful.

I read the whole book in less than 24 hours. Yes, I skimmed some of it, but only because I was solidly grounded in a few of the concepts. What sets this book apart from all the useful tools available on the web is that here Carroll digs deeply into the method *and* the deeper work of how we discern meaning in or lives, set meaningful goals, and go beyond simply list making or project planning to dig into our motivations and our internal challenges.

A lot of the "soft" material resonates with the value-driven processes of Stephen Covey's "7 Habits" books (of which I am a big fan). This doesn't replace Covey's work, but I think it does provide a much more flexible way of doing personal organization in support of living a purposeful, meaningful life.

Carroll's writing is friendly, encouraging, and clear. There's no jargon here, only a few specialized (and not complicated) terms which he explains up front. It's an over-used phrase, but he really does come across like a good friend who has come up with a really cool method he wants to share with you. Even better: he wants to help you make it what *you* need, not dictate anything beyond the few simple structural principles and methodology on which everything else is based.

Bullet journals are celebrated and shared by a lot of very talented artists who lovingly spend hours on hand lettering and decorating their pages (and sharing them online), but the bujo itself is a streamlined tool which can be as simple and stark as you want it to be. Or as elaborate, if that's what makes you happy. It's hard to imagine anyone who could not benefit from this tool, and while someone could get started using just the online material, reading this book will provide a much deeper and more valuable handle on how to get the maximum benefit. ( )
  jsabrina | Jul 13, 2021 |
I had been scraping by with a bujo for the last few months, using blogs, YouTube, Social Media groups to piece it all together. Sitting down and reading the book today has really helped me work out how to turn what I was doing into an even more effective tool. I am very keen to implement the ideas I have read, and I will be referring back and forth to the book for a while, to get the most out of it. ( )
  Vividrogers | Dec 20, 2020 |
I wanted to like this book. My daily journal/calendar/task list has morphed quite a bit over the years, and I was interested in the specific mechanics of how Carroll does his bullet journal. That content could have been explained in about 10 pages. The other 300 pages of this is mostly woo-woo self help stuff that isn’t anything new. I did get a few good ideas of how to fine tune my system, but it wasn’t anything that needed a whole book to get done. ( )
  loretteirene | Dec 17, 2020 |
I've been a fan of the Bullet Journal for awhile (see my blog post on it), though my use of the method is admittedly somewhat inconsistent. I wanted to get back into it for the new year, and the publication of this book was as good a chance as any do so.

I read the book from cover to cover, which was probably a mistake given my familiarity with the subject matter, as it went over each component of the method in detail. That said, those who are not familiar would do well to read it through fully to understand all the pieces. Once you become familiar, the book has a pretty easy layout that can be used as a quick reference.

I found Part III, "The Practice," to be the least compelling, though I imagine some people may find they like it the most. While the section had some good ideas, it was too long by half, and it simply reiterated the same concepts over a bunch of different specific implementations. There's nothing wrong with that, per se, but abstract thinkers could get by with reading one or two of the sections within Part III and simply do a wash/rinse/repeat for the rest.

I recommend the Bullet Journal method for anyone who is looking for a better way to organize their tasks/projects/goals and whatnot (including their book-related goals!). The book itself is good as a handy reference, though most of what it says can be found online for free, and often more succinctly.

Finally, for those who didn't bother to click through to my blog post above, keep in mind that pretty, artistic templates and headings have nothing to do with Bullet Journaling. If you're scared away because you're not an artist, then I present below the first question and answer from the FAQ on p. 291:

Q: I'm not artistic. Can I still Bullet Journal?

A: Yes. The only thing that matters in BuJo is the content, not the presentation.

(See also the section on Design starting on p. 244). ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
This book has inspired me to be both more mindful and more intentional about the way I plan, brainstorm, and organize. I look forward to giving this method a try. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
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To my parents for just about everything.
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For years, Ryder Carroll tried countless organizing systems, online and off, but none of them fit the way his mind worked. Out of sheer necessity, he developed a method called the Bullet Journal that helped him become consistently focused and effective. When he started sharing his system with friends who faced similar challenges, it went viral. Just a few years later, to his astonishment, Bullet Journaling is a global movement. The Bullet Journal Method is about much more than organizing your notes and to-do lists. It's about what Carroll calls "intentional living": weeding out distractions and focusing your time and energy in pursuit of what's truly meaningful, in both your work and your personal life. It's about spending more time with what you care about, by working on fewer things. Carroll wrote this book for frustrated list-makers, overwhelmed multitaskers, and creatives who need some structure. Whether you've used a Bullet Journal for years or have never seen one before, The Bullet Journal Method will help you go from passenger to pilot of your own life.

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