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Sociolinguistics An Introduction by Peter…
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Sociolinguistics An Introduction (original 2001; edition 1975)

by Peter Trudgill

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454347,560 (3.7)3
The way we talk is deeply influenced by our class, sex and ethnic background. It can also have a profound effect on how we are perceived by others. In this fully updated new edition of a classic text, Peter Trudgill explores the evidence - and the huge implications for social and educational policy . Why do men swear more than women? How do speech styles of most Black Americans, and whites growing up in 'Black areas' differ from those of other whites? Does it make sense to defend a language against 'contamination' from foreign words and phrases? Such questions illuminate many fascinatin g aspects of human communication, but they also lie at the heart of fierce political debates about how states should deal with their linguistic minorities, when teachers should correct their pupils' grammar and pronunciation, and whether language promotes racial and sexual stereotypes. Only sociolinguists can provide objective answers- their key conclusions are set out in this celebrated book.… (more)
Member:lesleydemuynck
Title:Sociolinguistics An Introduction
Authors:Peter Trudgill
Info:Penguin Books (1975), Paperback, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
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Sociolinguistics: an introduction by Peter Trudgill (2001)

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Interesting discussion of language use. The back cover blurb makes it seem like a “pop psychology” book – with questions like “Why do men swear more than women?” and “…is standard French ‘better’ than Québécois or High German ‘better; than Schweizerdeutsch?” However, inside it’s pretty technical, with terms like “nonprevocalic /r/” and “affinitive affix”. Individual chapters discuss language and social class (author Peter Trudgill is English; he notes two English people who have never met before will discuss the weather – not because they are interested in meteorology but so each can determine the other’s social class); language and ethnic group (in the former Yugoslavia, people from Croatia call their language Croatian, people from Serbia call it Serbian, and now that Bosnia is independent people there speak Bosnian – but it’s all the same language; language and sex (in English and Hungarian, it’s possible to write a novel in the first person without a linguistic way of determining if the narrator is male or female, but other languages have gender differences in adjectives, verbs and pronouns and in some women’s language is very different from men’s). (And to answer the question on the back cover, women from many cultures use “better” language than men, the exception being cultures where women are denied education). Further chapters discuss language and context, language and nation, language and geography, language and contact, and language and humanity.

I found this a relatively easy read, despite the technical details. There are graphs and tables that show things like language difference between social classes and ethnic groups. No footnotes, but a “Suggestions for further reading” at the end. ( )
2 vote setnahkt | May 24, 2020 |
Read it for class. I know Trudgill is supposed to be top of the field, but but unless this is your thing, the writing is very dense and like listening to stuffed shirts pick apart the minutia of language. ( )
  AnnaHernandez | Oct 17, 2019 |
Linguistics Society
  Budzul | Jun 1, 2008 |
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The way we talk is deeply influenced by our class, sex and ethnic background. It can also have a profound effect on how we are perceived by others. In this fully updated new edition of a classic text, Peter Trudgill explores the evidence - and the huge implications for social and educational policy . Why do men swear more than women? How do speech styles of most Black Americans, and whites growing up in 'Black areas' differ from those of other whites? Does it make sense to defend a language against 'contamination' from foreign words and phrases? Such questions illuminate many fascinatin g aspects of human communication, but they also lie at the heart of fierce political debates about how states should deal with their linguistic minorities, when teachers should correct their pupils' grammar and pronunciation, and whether language promotes racial and sexual stereotypes. Only sociolinguists can provide objective answers- their key conclusions are set out in this celebrated book.

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