HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

All There Is to Know

by Alexander Coleman (Editor), Charles Simmons (Editor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
94None216,600 (3.25)1
"In the world of encyclopedias, only the Britannica has attained the status of literature. From the century and a half of the Encyclopaedia Britannica's existence, it was the eleventh edition - published in 1910 - that is universally regarded as an exemplar of encyclopedias and the supreme reference tool of the cultivated English-speaking reader. This unique book, All There Is to Know, is a celebration of and an homage to the great eleventh edition. Gathered here in a single volume are the most fascinating and essential, the most idiosyncratic and gloriously thoughtful entries from the eleventh - an eclectic selection of readings for the robustly curious person." "Unlike the alphabetically arranged encyclopedia itself, All There Is to Know takes the Britannica's finest pieces and organizes them under the categorical rubrics of "Brief Lives," "Crimes and Punishments," "Fun and Games," "The Invisible World," "Natural Selections," "The Literary Life," "Peoples," "O Tempora, O Mores!," and "Things of This World." Readers will find essays of rare brilliance, ebullience, and authority about subjects as varied as Base-Ball; Pugilism; the Cockroach; the Evil Eye; Fire-Walking; Boiling to Death; and the lives of Jane Austen, P. T. Barnum, Cinderella, and Henry James. Also included are the celebrated essays by Lucien Wolf on Anti-Semitism and by Lord Macaulay on Samuel Johnson; a sociologically backward essay on the Negro; and explanations of such phenomena as Running Amuck, Tarring and Feathering, and Toast." "The eleventh edition of the Britannica is uniquely representative of that era before the Great War and several proletarian revolutions, before the Theory of Relativity and the messy intrusions of the modern age. With its distinct "Oxbridge" point of view, the eleventh sought to catalog all available knowledge of flora and fauna, significant people, historical events, "foreign" cultures, and ideas of import. But the Britannica also revealed its quirkiness by meticulously describing such common activities as horseback riding and swimming, while at the same time displaying a morbid fascination with corporal punishment." "Editors Alexander Coleman and Charles Simmons have combed all twenty-eight volumes, all 44 million words, to mine the riches of this informational motherlode for the modern reader. Anyone who wants to penetrate the passions, delights, fears, and prejudices of the period will find this volume a treasure trove. All There Is to Know is a readable anthology of knowledge and a unique collection of curiosities that no reference buff or connoisseur of prose will want to be without."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (more)
Recently added byprivate library, Al_Ennis, dubeyak, IceCurler, Brodiepaul, Squires29

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Coleman, AlexanderEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Simmons, CharlesEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Prologue: For the culture that produces it, an encyclopedia contains all the world, summed up in words.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"In the world of encyclopedias, only the Britannica has attained the status of literature. From the century and a half of the Encyclopaedia Britannica's existence, it was the eleventh edition - published in 1910 - that is universally regarded as an exemplar of encyclopedias and the supreme reference tool of the cultivated English-speaking reader. This unique book, All There Is to Know, is a celebration of and an homage to the great eleventh edition. Gathered here in a single volume are the most fascinating and essential, the most idiosyncratic and gloriously thoughtful entries from the eleventh - an eclectic selection of readings for the robustly curious person." "Unlike the alphabetically arranged encyclopedia itself, All There Is to Know takes the Britannica's finest pieces and organizes them under the categorical rubrics of "Brief Lives," "Crimes and Punishments," "Fun and Games," "The Invisible World," "Natural Selections," "The Literary Life," "Peoples," "O Tempora, O Mores!," and "Things of This World." Readers will find essays of rare brilliance, ebullience, and authority about subjects as varied as Base-Ball; Pugilism; the Cockroach; the Evil Eye; Fire-Walking; Boiling to Death; and the lives of Jane Austen, P. T. Barnum, Cinderella, and Henry James. Also included are the celebrated essays by Lucien Wolf on Anti-Semitism and by Lord Macaulay on Samuel Johnson; a sociologically backward essay on the Negro; and explanations of such phenomena as Running Amuck, Tarring and Feathering, and Toast." "The eleventh edition of the Britannica is uniquely representative of that era before the Great War and several proletarian revolutions, before the Theory of Relativity and the messy intrusions of the modern age. With its distinct "Oxbridge" point of view, the eleventh sought to catalog all available knowledge of flora and fauna, significant people, historical events, "foreign" cultures, and ideas of import. But the Britannica also revealed its quirkiness by meticulously describing such common activities as horseback riding and swimming, while at the same time displaying a morbid fascination with corporal punishment." "Editors Alexander Coleman and Charles Simmons have combed all twenty-eight volumes, all 44 million words, to mine the riches of this informational motherlode for the modern reader. Anyone who wants to penetrate the passions, delights, fears, and prejudices of the period will find this volume a treasure trove. All There Is to Know is a readable anthology of knowledge and a unique collection of curiosities that no reference buff or connoisseur of prose will want to be without."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.25)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,572,908 books! | Top bar: Always visible