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The 100: A Ranking Of The Most Influential Persons In History (1978)

by Michael H. Hart

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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385648,416 (3.69)None
In 1978, when Michael Hart?s controversial book The 100was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that in the intervening years the influence of some of his original selections had grown or lessened and that new names loomed large on the world stage. Thus, the publications of this revised and updated edition of The 100.As before, Hart?s yardstick is influence- not the greatest people, but the most influential, the people who swayed the destinies of millions of human beings, determined the rise and fall of civilizations, changed the course of history. With incisive biographies, Hart describes their careers and contributions. Explaining his ratings, he presents a new perspective on history, gathering together the vital facts about the world?s greatest religious and political leaders, inventors, writers, philosophers, explorers, artists, and innovators-from Asoka to Zoroaster. Most of the biographies are accompanied by photographs or sketches. Hart?s selections may be surprising to some. Neither Jesus nor Marx, but Muhammad, is designated as the most influential person in human history. The writer?s arguments may challenge and perhaps convince readers, but whether or not they agree with him, his manner of ranking is both informative and entertaining. The 100, revised and updated, is truly a monumental work. It promises to be just as controversial, just as thought-provoking, and just as successful as its predecessor-a perfect addition to any history or philosophy reference section.… (more)

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Interesting book. This author did his best and it is very thought provoking. He does voice his own speculations and misgivings and why he decided on the selections, whether we agree or not with it all it is fascinating. ( )
1 vote Bruce_Deming | Nov 2, 2013 |
I had a few problems with this fellow's picks for Most Influential Persons in History. For one thing, three of the hundred were American presidents! That seems a little slanted! Also, the author openly states that he has only chosen one writer and one artist because writers and artists---get this---don't influence anyone except other writers and artists! It was fun just to see who he picked, to think who I'd pick, and to ask my family who they would pick. I didn't count this book in my total for the year as I only browsed through much of it. ( )
2 vote debnance | Jan 29, 2010 |
Very interesting, you will be suprised to learn how many important persons have influenced the humanity ( )
1 vote MarioSantamaria | Apr 7, 2009 |
While one may not agree with Hart's rankings, this is a fascinating book. I learn something every time I pick it up
1 vote prepper | Jan 6, 2008 |
My favorite history reference, this is Michael Hart's take on the 100 most influential persons in history. Not the best, not the most admirable, although those would also be interesting lists. This is a list graded by influence, with specific rules by the author. Each person is presented with a mini-biography and the author's reasons for placing said person. Includes a list of honorable mentions and statistics on the 100. Entirely subjective and open to argument (which is a lot of fun), but as it happens, I find no fault with the author's selection of the first ten. Would love to see a more up-to-date list. I'm sure Bill Gates would find a high spot, and other positions might shift based on the recent collapse of Soviet Communism. ( )
1 vote burnit99 | Jan 29, 2007 |
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In 1978, when Michael Hart?s controversial book The 100was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that in the intervening years the influence of some of his original selections had grown or lessened and that new names loomed large on the world stage. Thus, the publications of this revised and updated edition of The 100.As before, Hart?s yardstick is influence- not the greatest people, but the most influential, the people who swayed the destinies of millions of human beings, determined the rise and fall of civilizations, changed the course of history. With incisive biographies, Hart describes their careers and contributions. Explaining his ratings, he presents a new perspective on history, gathering together the vital facts about the world?s greatest religious and political leaders, inventors, writers, philosophers, explorers, artists, and innovators-from Asoka to Zoroaster. Most of the biographies are accompanied by photographs or sketches. Hart?s selections may be surprising to some. Neither Jesus nor Marx, but Muhammad, is designated as the most influential person in human history. The writer?s arguments may challenge and perhaps convince readers, but whether or not they agree with him, his manner of ranking is both informative and entertaining. The 100, revised and updated, is truly a monumental work. It promises to be just as controversial, just as thought-provoking, and just as successful as its predecessor-a perfect addition to any history or philosophy reference section.

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