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The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware
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The Turn of the Key (edition 2019)

by Ruth Ware (Author)

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1,0398913,998 (3.86)47
"From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of In a Dark, Dark Wood, The Woman in Cabin 10, The Lying Game, and The Death of Mrs. Westaway comes Ruth Ware's highly anticipated fifth novel. When she stumbles across the ad, she's looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss--a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten--by the luxurious "smart" home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family. What she doesn't know is that she's stepping into a nightmare--one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder. Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unravelling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn't just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music, or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn't just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn't even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant. It was everything. She knows she's made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn't always ideal. She's not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she's not guilty--at least not of murder. Which means someone else is. Full of spellbinding menace and told in Ruth Ware's signature suspenseful style, The Turn of the Key is an unputdownable thriller from the Agatha Christie of our time"--… (more)
Member:danisaur
Title:The Turn of the Key
Authors:Ruth Ware (Author)
Info:Gallery/Scout Press (2019), 352 pages
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The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

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Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
4.5/5 stars

I really enjoyed this book. I listen to it on auto and it only added to the creepyness of the story *sorry for the spelling*. There were many twist and turns that kept me on the edge of my seat. So many OMG moments...lol. The only thing that is keeping me from giving it 5 stars is the ending. It seemed to end with many questions. I mean what happen to Rowan??? Did she end up staying in prison or did she get out???? And what about the letter from Ellie, where she confessed in the killing, did they end up using it??? To me, there were many questions unanswered at the end. Maybe the author did that on purpose to leave the ending to the reader. But over all it was a good book that I would recommend. ( )
  Jennifer7089 | Sep 29, 2020 |
The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware disappoints me. Too many items left hanging. I like my stories with everything completed by the last page. Too many questions of what happened with Rachel Gerhardt, and the Elincourt family. The “smart house” freaked me with all the cameras and locks and controls. I am not amused by a futuristic house. The story starts like an epistolary novel in the style of Pamela with Rowan writing to a barrister, but quickly changes to Rowan’s account of her nanny job. The Elincourt children span from 18 months to 14 years old all girls, and what a headache for anyone. The parents leave this nanny alone with this riotous group after one day. Do the parents care so little for their children? What happens? One of the girls dies and the reader does not learn which girl or the cause of the death. A unique story, but not to my taste. ( )
  delphimo | Sep 20, 2020 |
4.5 stars ( )
  bridget1213 | Sep 3, 2020 |
Ruth Ware's newest novel, The Turn Of The Key, blends the creepily invasive smarthome of The Girl Before with the highland isolation of The Hunting Party. Rowan, a nursery worker in London, finds a too-good-to-be-true job posting as a live-in nanny in a beautiful home in the highlands... but she also needs to be too-good-to-be-true to get it.

Rowan finds endless troubles at the house. The kids are either little jerks testing the limits of a new babysitter (who may not be quite as experienced as she claims), or bringing freakish messages from beyond the grave. The smarthome allows the distant parents to watch her at any time, and sometimes the app that controls everything from locks to lights has a mind of it's own. There's also a history of little girls dying or disappearing on this property...

I’ve really enjoyed the twists and reversals in Ruth Ware's other books, like The Death of Mrs. Westaway and The Lying Game. Yes, I know The Woman In Cabin 10 is the one everyone else likes, but it just didn’t pull me in the way her other novels did. Rich people using endless wealth, power and connections to be Extremely Evil isn’t nearly as compelling as regular people pushed to do awful things to keep their secrets hidden. In The Turn Of The Key, I was pulled in by Rowan wanting the job and then wanting to stay in the luxurious house, and even when I worked out her first secret, I was stunned by the following ones.

I really enjoyed this page-turner, but I didn't love the flash-forward opening. There's a payoff in the end, sure, but I thought the letter to a solicitor from jail took the suspense down a bit. (Also, I tend to find epistolary novels forced and artificial.)

This is another not-gory pageturner, and a great successor to The Lying Game and The Death of Mrs. Westaway. ( )
  TheFictionAddiction | Aug 12, 2020 |
This is the story of a live-in nanny accused of killing one of the children she is caring for. The story is told through letters but the majority of the time you forget you are reading letters as you are told what happened. Initially, I found it quite intriguing but then it seemed to draw on a little too much. In the end, I liked the twists to bring it to a close, but feel it could have been done better. It felt like in the end of a movie or TV show when the guilty party blurts out all their reasoning for doing what they did right before being arrested. I’m not saying the nanny did or didn’t do it – not all the letters are written by her so I’m not giving anything away, but that’s how the writing felt when trying to finish the book and tie up any loose ends. The last few letters just felt too forced. ( )
  lynnski723 | Aug 6, 2020 |
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For Ian, with more love than I know how to put into words
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3rd September 2017
Dear Mr. Wrexham,
I know you don't know me but please, please, please you have to help me
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"From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of In a Dark, Dark Wood, The Woman in Cabin 10, The Lying Game, and The Death of Mrs. Westaway comes Ruth Ware's highly anticipated fifth novel. When she stumbles across the ad, she's looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss--a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten--by the luxurious "smart" home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family. What she doesn't know is that she's stepping into a nightmare--one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder. Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unravelling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn't just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music, or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn't just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn't even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant. It was everything. She knows she's made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn't always ideal. She's not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she's not guilty--at least not of murder. Which means someone else is. Full of spellbinding menace and told in Ruth Ware's signature suspenseful style, The Turn of the Key is an unputdownable thriller from the Agatha Christie of our time"--

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