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Lady in the Lake: A Novel by Laura Lippman
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Lady in the Lake: A Novel (original 2019; edition 2019)

by Laura Lippman (Author)

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436400,269 (3.2)2
Member:RidgewayGirl
Title:Lady in the Lake: A Novel
Authors:Laura Lippman (Author)
Info:William Morrow (2019), 352 pages
Collections:Read but unowned, NetGalley
Rating:****
Tags:Fiction, American Author, Historical Novel, Crime Novel, USA, Maryland, Baltimore, Netgalley, 2019CC

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Lady in the Lake: A Novel by Laura Lippman (2019)

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
I have read a couple other books by Laura Lippman that I enjoyed, so I was looking forward to reading this book too. I have to say that this was my least favorite of hers that I've read. This was a crime novel, but it seemed more like historical fiction, so expectations may have had something to do with it. I did enjoy hearing the perspective of all the different characters. Thank you to Netgalley and Faber & Faber for allowing me to read this early in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  amysan | Jul 16, 2019 |
When her husband invites home for dinner a man she knew in high school, 37 year old Maddie is jolted out of her comfortable world of being a Jewish housewife and mother to a teenage son. It's 1966, Baltimore is changing and Maddie wants to be out in the world, living. She moves out, gets an apartment and a secret lover and decides that she wants to become a journalist. But she's too old and the wrong gender to get a job at a newspaper the traditional way, so when the disappearance of a little girl gives her an opportunity, she grabs it. But when her dream job turns into her being a glorified secretary, she finds another missing persons case to dig into, a woman whose body is found dumped in a public fountain. But Maddie is an outsider just learning her job there are people who have a vested interest in keeping her quiet.

Maddie is a fantastic character. She's by turns yearning and manipulative, honest and willing to do what it takes to get what she wants, independent and insecure. I'm not sure I'd like her if I met her, but she is a fascinating person to follow around.

Laura Lippman is that rare kind of bestseller writer, the kind that is constantly improving their work. She's always been good at putting together a suspenseful plot and paired that with solid writing, but she's been expanding her reach. Yes, this is set in Baltimore, as most of Lippman's books are, but this one deals with both Civil Rights issues and political corruption. There's a lot more depth here than usual and Lippman is up for it, writing a crime novel that works well in its genre, while also providing a novel rich in historical detail and nuanced characters. ( )
  RidgewayGirl | Jul 11, 2019 |
An excellent novel of 1960s Baltimore and the newsworld, centered on a Jewish wife who wants her life to be more, and the black woman who became known as the lady in the lake. Lippman keeps the suspense up. But it is her characters, their wishes and regrets, and the depiction of their worlds that makes this a fantastic story. ( )
  Perednia | Jul 7, 2019 |
a netgalley that I picked up because I had read some books by the author and the summary was intriguing. A married woman leaves her husband and starts investigating the disappearances of a child and a young woman in Baltimore in the 1960s. She's struck by the attention the missing white child receives compared to the black woman, and enthusiastically tries to get involved, partly for her sense of justice, but mostly because she sees a way to change her life. This was a fascinating picture of a city on the verge of substantial change, from the new opportunities for black policemen to young Jewish women trying to break away from the rules on marrying within the community. It felt real, perhaps most when the women characters talked about their problems getting into careers, and how they coped. I loved the picture of the hard bitten reporter who had taken over one of the women's bathrooms and converted it into her own office to find a way to adapt in an unwelcoming newsroom. It just didn't seem to have much of a sense of direction, and I got distracted from it several times by more pacey reads.
  charl08 | Jun 16, 2019 |
I had stopped reading Laura Lippman, so I enjoyed the foray into Lady in the Lake. This novel reminded me of the writing style of James Patterson with the short chapters that propel the reader to start the next chapter and before you stop reading, you have completed half of the novel. The story also hints at William Faulkner and his stream of consciousness writing in The Sound and the Fury. The setting displays Baltimore in the 1960’s---1966 to be exact. Two young women are murdered: one a Jewish girl and the other a black woman, and Lippman shows the difference in the handling of each death by the Baltimore police department and the local newspapers. I totally enjoyed how Lippman exposes the feelings of different characters, such as the young sons of Cleo. I felt that the handling of Maddie to be a little unbelieving such as her divorce, dating adventures, and job experiences. ( )
  delphimo | Apr 6, 2019 |
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Book description
In 1966, Baltimore is a city of secrets that everyone seems to know—everyone, that is, except Madeline “Maddie” Schwartz. Last year, she was a happy, even pampered housewife. This year, she’s bolted from her marriage of almost twenty years, determined to make good on her youthful ambitions to live a passionate, meaningful life.

Maddie wants to matter, to leave her mark on a swiftly changing world. Drawing on her own secrets, she helps Baltimore police find a murdered girl—assistance that leads to a job at the city’s afternoon newspaper, the Star. Working at the newspaper offers Maddie the opportunity to make her name, and she has found just the story to do it: a missing woman whose body was discovered in the fountain of a city park lake.

Cleo Sherwood was a young African-American woman who liked to have a good time. No one seems to know or care why she was killed except Maddie—and the dead woman herself. Maddie’s going to find the truth about Cleo’s life and death. Cleo’s ghost, privy to Maddie’s poking and prying, wants to be left alone.

Maddie’s investigation brings her into contact with people that used to be on the periphery of her life—a jewelry store clerk, a waitress, a rising star on the Baltimore Orioles, a patrol cop, a hardened female reporter, a lonely man in a movie theater. But for all her ambition and drive, Maddie often fails to see the people right in front of her. Her inability to look beyond her own needs will lead to tragedy and turmoil for all sorts of people—including the man who shares her bed, a black police officer who cares for Maddie more than she knows.
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The revered New York Times bestselling author returns with a novel set in 1960s Baltimore that combines modern psychological insights with elements of classic noir, about a middle-aged housewife turned aspiring reporter who pursues the murder of a forgotten young woman. In 1966, Baltimore is a city of secrets that everyone seems to know--everyone, that is, except Madeline "Maddie" Schwartz. Last year, she was a happy, even pampered housewife. This year, she's bolted from her marriage of almost twenty years, determined to make good on her youthful ambitions to live a passionate, meaningful life. Maddie wants to matter, to leave her mark on a swiftly changing world. Drawing on her own secrets, she helps Baltimore police find a murdered girl--assistance that leads to a job at the city's afternoon newspaper, the Star. Working at the newspaper offers Maddie the opportunity to make her name, and she has found just the story to do it: a missing woman whose body was discovered in the fountain of a city park lake. Cleo Sherwood was a young black woman who liked to have a good time. No one seems to know or care why she was killed except Maddie--and the dead woman herself. Maddie's going to find the truth about Cleo's life and death. Cleo's ghost, privy to Maddie's poking and prying, wants to be left alone. Maddie's investigation brings her into contact with people that used to be on the periphery of her life--a jewelry store clerk, a waitress, a rising star on the Baltimore Orioles, a patrol cop, a hardened female reporter, a lonely man in a movie theater. But for all her ambition and drive, Maddie often fails to see the people right in front of her. Her inability to look beyond her own needs will lead to tragedy and turmoil for all sorts of people--including the man who shares her bed, a black police officer who cares for Maddie more than she knows.… (more)

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