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Prize-Winning Science Fair Projects for…
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Prize-Winning Science Fair Projects for Curious Kids (edition 2004)

by Joe Rhatigan, Rain Newcomb

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391517,199 (3)None
Contains ideas for cool science projects using items found around the house or at a nearby store. From thinking of a unique science fair experiment to putting fabulous finishing touches on the display, this cool collection of 50 smart and illustrated projects gives budding scientists everything they need to put together a winner-and have fun doing it, too. Kids have seen all the tricks, and they're tired of science fair books that show them (yawn) how to make the "been there, done that" volcano or a boring model of the solar system. Here are experiments they really want to do, on subjects such as slime, magic sand, video games, mummies, dog germs, horoscopes, bicycles, and more. The whole science fair experience is broken down into small, manageable steps, so youngsters won't feel overwhelmed. All safety precautions are taken, with notes on parental supervision, when necessary. The author lives in Asheville, NC.… (more)
Member:inkster9
Title:Prize-Winning Science Fair Projects for Curious Kids
Authors:Joe Rhatigan
Other authors:Rain Newcomb
Info:Lark Books (2004), Hardcover, 112 pages
Collections:Your library
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Prize-Winning Science Fair Projects for Curious Kids by Joe Rhatigan

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This science fair book has some neat activities that teachers could do with their classes. A few cool projects that I found included measuring your heart rate after hyperventilating and hypo-ventilating to observe the effect of breathing on heart rate and testing sunscreens on photo-reactive paper to determine which SPF value blocks the most sun rays. The most interesting project that I found predicted how the types of pigments in a green leaf determine its fall color. Early in the school year, students will collect one green leaf from three different trees. Using a rubbing alcohol, a coffee filter and a few other household products, the student can see the alcohol spread up the filter through the pigment. In the fall, once the trees have changed colors, the student will do the entire experiment again and compare the new results to the green leaves. I think this is an awesome project for students, because it is spread out over time. A lot of science projects only take one day, but this project allows students to see a change over a greater span of time, rather than a few minutes or even a few seconds, like other science projects. ( )
  roryblythe | Oct 14, 2010 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Joe Rhatiganprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rhatigan, Joemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Newcomb, Rainmain authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Contains ideas for cool science projects using items found around the house or at a nearby store. From thinking of a unique science fair experiment to putting fabulous finishing touches on the display, this cool collection of 50 smart and illustrated projects gives budding scientists everything they need to put together a winner-and have fun doing it, too. Kids have seen all the tricks, and they're tired of science fair books that show them (yawn) how to make the "been there, done that" volcano or a boring model of the solar system. Here are experiments they really want to do, on subjects such as slime, magic sand, video games, mummies, dog germs, horoscopes, bicycles, and more. The whole science fair experience is broken down into small, manageable steps, so youngsters won't feel overwhelmed. All safety precautions are taken, with notes on parental supervision, when necessary. The author lives in Asheville, NC.

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