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Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice:…
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Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice: Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto

by David Rosand

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351488,653 (4)1
Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice, here published in a revised and updated edition, explores the visual tradition of one of the most important centres of the Italian Renaissance through a study of three masters - Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto. These painters dominated and shaped the traditions of Venetian painting in the High and Late Renaissance. Establishing the conditions of painting in Renaissance Venice, including the social, economic and political situation of arts and artists and the aesthetic values that distinguish Venetian painting from that of Central Italy, David Rosand also explores the formal principles and technical procedures that determined the uniqueness of painting in Venice, above all the development of oil painting on canvas. He also analyses individual images, altarpieces and mural paintings within the several contexts of conventions and institutions - artistic, social, historical - of Renaissance Venice.… (more)

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This excellent book is a fundamental contribution to the study of Venetian painting in the cinquecento. Rosand pays close attention to the sensual, aesthetic qualities of these painters' works while seeing them as growing out of specific historical and artistic concerns. His interpretations are convincing and often masterful. The chapter on Titian's 'Presentation of the Virgin at the Temple' is alone worth admission.

An example of his acute observation and precise wording, here is how Rosand briefly characterizes Tintoretto's theatricality: "The deep perspectives of the 'Carrying of the Body of St. Mark', for example, do indeed distinguish his spatial conception from Veronese's grand 'logge', and the insistence of such a spatial invitation is quite different in its urgency from the calculated planar control of Veronese's theater of aristocratic humanism. It is precisely in this directness of assault that the full seriousness of Tintoretto's representations is felt--less as a sophisticated game of aesthetically distancing mediating planes than as an immediate confrontation with an event of the most palpable presence. For all the evident links with Serlian stage perspective, for all his own presumed awareness of the comedies of Ruzante and personal frienship with Andrea Calmo, Tintoretto's theater is essentially religious."
  pranogajec | Nov 19, 2011 |
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Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice explores the visual tradition of one of the most important centres of the Italian Renaissance through a study of three masters - Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto. These painters dominated and shaped the traditions of Venetian painting in the High and Late Renaissance. Establishing the conditions of painting in Renaissance Venice, including the social, economic and political situation of arts and artists and the aesthetic values that distinguish Venetian painting from that of Central Italy, David Rosand also explores the formal principles and technical procedures that determined the uniqueness of painting in Venice, above all the development of oil painting on canvas. He also analyses individual images, altarpieces and mural paintings within the several contexts of conventions and institutions - artistic, social, historical - of Renaissance Venice.
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