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How to Hack a Heartbreak

by Kristin Rockaway

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1036212,733 (3.52)1
Swipe right for love. Swipe left for disaster. By day, Mel Strickland is an underemployed helpdesk tech at a startup incubator, Hatch, where she helps entitled brogrammers--"Hatchlings"--who can't even fix their own laptops, but are apparently the next wave of startup geniuses. And by night, she goes on bad dates with misbehaving dudes she's matched with on the ubiquitous dating app, Fluttr. But after one dick pic too many, Mel has had it. Using her brilliant coding skills, she designs an app of her own, one that allows users to log harrassers and abusers in online dating space. It's called JerkAlert, and it goes viral overnight. Mel is suddenly in way over her head. Worse still, her almost-boyfriend, the dreamy Alex Hernandez--the only non-douchey guy at Hatch--has no idea she's the brains behind the app. Soon, Mel is faced with a terrible choice: one that could destroy her career, love life, and friendships, or change her life forever. Kristin Rockaway is a native New Yorker and recovering corporate software engineer. After working in the IT industry for far too many years, she finally traded the city for the surf and chased her dreams out to Southern California, where she spends her days happily writing stories instead of code. When she's not working, she enjoys spending time with her husband and son, and planning her next big vacation.… (more)
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Swipe left or swipe right?? Fluttr is the latest and greatest dating app. In seconds you decide if you want to match with someone or not. Mel Strickland has had a batch of bad dates and too many bad messages from the app to count. She may work a helpdesk fixing tech “geniuses” computers at Hatch, but she in fact can code herself. In a weekend she comes up with Jerkalert (.biz not .com) after one too many dick pics. This is a forum for women to post reviews on the men they met on Fluttr. It sounds like a great idea, but it quickly turns her life upside down.
Thankfully Mel had her girlfriends with her every step of the way. I loved how much they supported her throughout the entire story. And Mel…..she had depth. I hated her subway ride. I wanted to punch people at her work. I also wanted to sit her down and tell her to figure things out. She was just so human and so sweet.
I loved this book. From the beginning I really wanted to know how it ended but forced myself to not peek at the ending. It reminds me of Christina Lauren (Josh & Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating) or Sally Thorne (The Hating Game). Not only was it fully of heart, but also great characters.
( )
  i.should.b.reading | Oct 29, 2020 |
are making me like the New Adult genre more and more. Probably because it’s relatable.

One aspect about this book that I liked was the accuracy in which the workplace was portrayed. Mel works with tech start-ups, aka: the new app developers looking to come up with the latest trending app for users, and she’s essentially their backbone – working at the help desk to fix their computer problems and such. However, because she’s a woman, they don’t believe in her ability to code or fix things properly, which is very infuriating for Mel (and readers). Half of the time I was wishing I could jump into the book and clock some of these guys that mistreated Mel.

The story focuses more on Mel being fed up with online dating and how men treat women through the app (sending inappropriate messages, ghosting them, etc.). So she creates her own app/website called JerkAlert where women can warn others of some of these guys by posting their profile information and how they were, well, jerks. JerkAlert goes viral, however, it begins to cause some complications with Mel’s new sort-of relationship with one of the start-up guys, Alex.

I’m not going to give anything away, but I was somewhat disappointed in how things went the story. Don’t get me wrong, it still ended well, I just was hoping for a different approach to how it got there. I did also enjoy Mel’s group of friends, especially Whit because she’s just that firecracker friend that we all need in our lives.

So, all in all… How to Hack a Heartbreak was a good read and I recommend it! ( )
  genieinanovel | Sep 15, 2020 |
I loved this book! After reading (and loving!) Kristin Rockaway's newest book, She's Faking It, I was thrilled to grab this book of the shelf at the library. I'm so happy I did because I loved this one too. It was a quick, easy, sweet and fun read - exactly what I needed!

How to Hack a Heartbreak revolves around Mel, an IT Help Desk Professional, and her friends. They're a group of young professionals in NYC navigating the dating scene as well as tackling getting their footing in their respective careers. In many ways this book was similar to Sex and the City, if Carrie wrote code rather than columns.

I definitely recommend this one! ( )
  julesbailey9 | Sep 2, 2020 |
Please note that I received this via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.

Well this was downright delightful. I really got a kick out of Rockway's book and the characters she introduced in this one. Besides the main character of Mel, she has some really awesome best friends (Whitney, Lia, and Dani) and a great roommate (Vanessa). I loved the book taking a look at women who are very good at coding (like Mel) and how hard it was to break into the tech world due to the douchebros that seem to inhabit it. The writing was very crisp and the flow was great. I loved the romance and the ending!

"How to Hack a Heartbreak" has 20 something year old Mel ready to hang up dating. She has used all of the dating apps, and the latest craze, Fluttr, is still not providing her with a guy that actually wants to date her. After being stood up and receiving one more "[redacted] pic" she has enough. After being egged on by her friends, she sets up a site called JerkAlert which women can anonymously post to about guys they have met or messaged on Fluttr. After JerkAlert goes viral, Mel also finds herself trying to start a relationship with her coworker Alex and wonders if she can trust him, or is he a jerk in sheep's clothing.

God, I felt Mel. I still am on some dating apps, but don't even check in anymore. Once you have someone send you a picture of them in full black leather (with a mask on) with a message asking can they call you a slave, I pretty much decided that books and my cat were sufficient. I regret nothing.

Mel keeps getting her hopes up, but she either meets guys that are just looking for a one night stand, ghosted her after a while, and or she gets the before mentioned "[redacted] pics." She wishes she was more like her friend Whitney who is not looking for anything serious and relishes her one night stands. But after her friend Lia has seemingly met the one on Fluttr, Mel is wondering as all women do, what's wrong with her. Mel is also a pretty great coder. She is stuck working at the help desk at a company called Hatch and sits around and watches a lot of men trying to get their start-ups off the ground. She's verbally abused and if she tries to stand up for herself, her jerk of a boss acts like she's being a bit too "female".

Besides Mel, I loved her friends. Whitney was fearless and also scared me a bit. She's protective of her friends and tells it like she sees it. Lia is a romantic at heart and no spoilers, but I was shrieking while reading about her and Mr. Right. Dani was good, but we really don't get in depth with her that much in this book. Not a criticism, but definitely she didn't feel as present in the book as Whitney and Lia did. I will also say that the girls remind me of my friends and I at that age. Getting together at night, wondering why all the guys we went out with were such a PITA and holding out hope for a nice guy.

The other characters we get, Vanessa (Mel's roommate) and Alex (her love interest) were written very well too. I get why Mel was apprehensive about Alex.

The writing was very good. I loved Mel's voice throughout. When her site goes viral you get her emotions about it (yeah she's great at coding and yikes what if someone finds out) and her realizing that parts of JerkAlert aren't that great. The flow was really good from beginning to end. I honestly couldn't put this book down once I started.

The setting of New York was pretty great. I loved how realistic it felt with Mel being stuck at her job at the help desk and she had to room with someone to afford to live in New York. I am always baffled at the romance reads I get into when some 20 year old is living in some sun lit two bedroom apartment somewhere. And there's no mention of the tininess of their apartment, commuting on the subway, and the insane rent.

Really loved the ending and the message it was pushing! ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Mel has had some bad experiences with men lately, particularly with men met through online dating. In a fit of vengeful pique, she codes JerkAlert -- a site where women can "review" men they've met through online dating sites and warn other girls to steer clear of the cheaters, the misogynists, and the compulsive senders of dick pics. She means to delete it after sharing it with her closest friends, but JerkAlert proves surprisingly popular. Meanwhile, a cute co-worker asks Mel out, and she really likes him -- but her recent experiences, plus seeing all of those JerkAlert reviews, make her insecure and paranoid. Plus, she's not about to tell him that she's the creator of JerkAlert. As their relationship deepens, the secrets and lies threaten to bring everything crashing down around Mel's shoulders.

Ugh, online dating. Everything I read about it (news articles, how-to guides, this book) makes me feel depressed. In this case, it was just painful to watch Mel self-destruct. It's a romance, so hardly a spoiler that things turn out well, but the middle part was hard for me to read (well, listen to, as I checked out the audiobook), and the eventual resolution felt like too little, too late to me. However, anyone with a happier view of online dating than I have might enjoy this book more. ( )
  foggidawn | Oct 29, 2019 |
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Swipe right for love. Swipe left for disaster. By day, Mel Strickland is an underemployed helpdesk tech at a startup incubator, Hatch, where she helps entitled brogrammers--"Hatchlings"--who can't even fix their own laptops, but are apparently the next wave of startup geniuses. And by night, she goes on bad dates with misbehaving dudes she's matched with on the ubiquitous dating app, Fluttr. But after one dick pic too many, Mel has had it. Using her brilliant coding skills, she designs an app of her own, one that allows users to log harrassers and abusers in online dating space. It's called JerkAlert, and it goes viral overnight. Mel is suddenly in way over her head. Worse still, her almost-boyfriend, the dreamy Alex Hernandez--the only non-douchey guy at Hatch--has no idea she's the brains behind the app. Soon, Mel is faced with a terrible choice: one that could destroy her career, love life, and friendships, or change her life forever. Kristin Rockaway is a native New Yorker and recovering corporate software engineer. After working in the IT industry for far too many years, she finally traded the city for the surf and chased her dreams out to Southern California, where she spends her days happily writing stories instead of code. When she's not working, she enjoys spending time with her husband and son, and planning her next big vacation.

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